NASA's Aqua satellite found Tropical Storm Danas moving over Japan's Ryuku island chain in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.The Ruyku islands include Osumi, Tokara, Amami, Okinawa, Yonaguni and the Sakishima Islands.The island chain extends southwest from Kyushu to Taiwan.On July 18 at 1:20 a.m. EDT (0520 UTC), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Danas that showed a large storm over Japan's Ryuku Island chain.The image shows that Danas is being affected by vertical wind shear, where winds at different levels of the atmosphere around the tropical cyclone are pushing against it and affecting the storm's shape.The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted, "A large area of deep convection sheared 60 nautical miles southward of a consolidating low-level center.
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NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Storm Danas as it continued to move north and away from the Philippines.On July 17 at 12:40 a.m. EDT (0440 UTC), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible look at Danas.The strongest thunderstorms appeared southeast of the center of circulation in the MODIS image.Danas was located northeast of Luzon, Philippines, in the Philippine Sea.At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on July 17, the center of Tropical Storm Danas was located near latitude 21.1 degrees north and longitude 124.0 degrees east.The center of Danas was about 421 nautical miles south-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa Island, Japan.
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NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of the clouds associated with Post-Tropical Cyclone Barry moving through the mid-Mississippi Valley on July 16, and headed toward the Ohio Valley.On July 16, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible look at Barry.Strongest thunderstorms appeared over northwestern Arkansas, western Tennessee and southwestern Kentucky at the time of the image.Barry's remnant clouds were also spreading into southern Indiana.By 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on July 17, NOAA's National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center in College Park, Maryland noted that Barry's center of circulation had moved to about 90 miles (150 km) northeast of Indianapolis, Indiana.The center of Post-Tropical Cyclone Barry was located near latitude 40.8 degrees north and longitude 85.3 degrees west.
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NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Northwester Pacific Ocean after the sixth tropical depression formed.Tropical Depression Danas formed northeast of the Northern Philippines and was already affecting the country.On July 16, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Danas that showed a large depression the stretched the entire length of the Philippines.Strongest thunderstorms remained off the coast in the image, but the northwestern and western quadrants were already over the Luzon and Visayas regions.At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Danas was located near latitude 17.2 degrees north and longitude 124.9 degrees west.Danas was about 587 nautical miles southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan.
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Even before Tropical Storm Barry made landfall in Louisiana on Saturday, July 13, it had already dropped a lot of rain on the state.Using satellite data, NASA created a map that shows areas that are likely flooded.The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., created an ARIA Flood Proxy Map (FPM) on July 13, depicting areas of Louisiana that are likely flooded as a result of heavy rain and Tropical storm Barry," said Judy Lai, project manager for ARIA at NASA's JPL.The maps were created from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data acquired on July 13, 2019 by the ALOS-2 satellite operated by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).Each pixel measures about 27 yards (25 meters) across.This flood proxy map can be used as guidance to identify areas that are likely flooded, and may be less reliable over urban and vegetated areas.
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The Eastern Pacific Ocean generated the fourth tropical cyclone of the hurricane season on July 13 and by the next day, it had already weakened into a remnant low pressure area.Tropical Depression 4E formed around 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Saturday, July 13.At that time the center of Tropical Depression Four-E was located near latitude 17.3 degrees and longitude 111.0 degrees west.That's about 395 miles (635 km) south of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.Maximum sustained winds were near 35 mph (55 kph).On Sunday, July 14 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), the center of Tropical Depression Four-E was located near latitude 18.2 degrees north and longitude 114.8 degrees west.
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Tropical Storm Barry continued to linger in the Gulf of Mexico, generating a lot of heavy rainfall on Saturday, July 13, 2019.Barry was just under the threshold of being classified a Category 1 hurricane and is expected to become one before landfall.At 3:15 a.m. EDT (0715 UTC) on July 13, the MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite looked at Tropical Strom Barry infrared light.MODIS found coldest cloud tops had temperatures near minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 degrees Celsius) south and east around a slightly more rounded center of the tropical storm.Storms with temperatures that cold are indicative of strong storms and have been shown to have the capability to generate heavy rainfall.The satellite image revealed a large area of strong thunderstorms that cold, surrounded by an even larger area of thunderstorms with cloud tops just slightly less cold.
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Tropical Storm Barry made landfall mid-day on July 13, but infrared satellite imagery from NASA early on July 14 continued to show the heaviest rainmaking storms were still off-shore.Barry made landfall around 2 p.m. EDT as a strong tropical storm about 5 miles (10 km) northeast of Intracoastal City, La.At 3:55 a.m. EDT (0755 UTC) on July 14, the MODIS or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite looked at Tropical Strom Barry infrared light.MODIS found coldest cloud tops had temperatures near minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 degrees Celsius) still off-shore from south central Louisiana.The heavy rainfall exacerbated by the slow movement is creating flooding dangers.Life-threatening flash flooding and significant river flooding are still expected along Barry's path inland from Louisiana up through the lower Mississippi Valley, through at least Monday.
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Barry, now a tropical depression, continues moving slowly north through Arkansas and rainfall and flooding remains a concern.NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the south central United States yesterday, July 14 and captured a visible image of then Tropical Storm Barry.Tropical Storm Barry tracked through northwestern Louisiana on July 14, and weakened to a tropical depression.Barry's rainfall created flooding along the Mississippi River.The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP provided a visible image of the storm on July 14 after it moved inland over Louisiana.The VIIRS image showed an elongated storm over Louisiana stretching over the Mississippi River Valley and into Arkansas, Mississippi, western Alabama and southwestern Tennessee.
As Tropical Storm Barry continues to barrel toward the Louisiana coast, flooding and rainfall are increasingly becoming a concern — especially for the city of New Orleans, which is more vulnerable during severe weather events.Barry is forecast to dump 10 to 20 inches of rain on New Orleans through Sunday.Some isolated areas could see as much as 25 inches.New Orleans is particularly vulnerable to flooding because of its low elevation, according to the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.Only about half of the city is above sea level — a drop from what once was 100 percent, per The Atlantic, which cited human interference as a primary reason for why the city has sunk.A 2016 NASA study also said “natural geologic” factors played a part.
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Hurricanes are known for strong winds and the potential to bring heavy rainfall — but do you understand the workings of the meteorological phenomena?Here's what you need to know as Tropical Storm Barry continues to make its way toward the Lousiana coast.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has detailed online how hurricanes take shape.“These violent storms form over the ocean, often beginning as a tropical wave — a low-pressure area that moves through the moisture-rich tropics, possibly enhancing shower and thunderstorm activity,” the agency explains.Warm air is another important factor.“As this weather system moves westward across the tropics, warm ocean air rises into the storm, forming an area of low pressure underneath,” the NOAA adds.
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When it comes to hurricanes, it’s all in a name.Katrina will forever bring to mind the unbridled devastation in Louisiana in 2005 as one of the costliest hurricanes in the U.S. on record.Maria recalls the destruction and massive loss of lives – particularly in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands – in 2017.With Maria, nearly 3,000 people in Puerto Rico were killed.And Harvey, also one of the costliest storms, is reminiscent of the catastrophe it brought to Texas and Louisiana in 2017.For Atlantic hurricanes, the National Hurricane Center (NHC) recycles a list of names every six years – a process that is maintained by the World Meteorological Organization, the NHC explained.
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The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a couple of views of Tropical Storm Barry that showed its cloud heights and rainfall rates.Tropical Storm Barry formed during the morning of July 11 and the National Hurricane Center has issued several warnings and watches.A Storm Surge Watch is in effect for Shell Beach to the Mississippi/Alabama border and for the mouth of the Atchafalaya River to Intracoastal City.A Hurricane Watch is in effect from the mouth of the Mississippi River to Cameron and a Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from east of the Mouth of the Pearl River to the Mississippi/Alabama border and for Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas including metropolitan New Orleans.NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) GPM Core Observatory passed over developing Tropical Depression 2 (which was upgraded to Tropical Storm Barry later in the morning) in the Gulf of Mexico the morning of July 11, 2019 at 8:26 a.m. CDT, capturing estimates of rainfall rates within the storm using GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument.GPM's Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) measured storm top heights as high as 18 kilometers (11.1 miles), which is extremely high and indicative of intense thunderstorm activity south of central Louisiana.
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New Orleans residents are preparing for Tropical Storm Barry, which could develop into a hurricane, to make landfall on Saturday.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Scientists can't definitely say whether Barry was directly caused by climate change, but they agree that warming overall makes storms and hurricanes more devastating than they would otherwise be.That's because higher water temperatures lead to sea-level rise, which causes flooding during high tides and in the event of storms surges.Climate scientist Michael Mann previously wrote on Facebook that Hurricane Harvey — which flooded Houston, killed more than 100 people, and caused $125 billion in damages — "was almost certainly more intense than it would have been in the absence of human-caused warming, which means stronger winds, more wind damage, and a larger storm surge."Hurricanes are vast, low-pressure tropical cyclones with wind speeds over 74 mph.
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NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Gulf of Mexico and took the temperature of Potential Tropical Cyclone 2 as it moved westward through the Gulf of Mexico.NASA found the very cold cloud tops indicating the storm had potential for dropping heavy rain.Infrared light enables NASA to take the temperatures of clouds and thunderstorms that make up tropical cyclones.The stronger the storms are indicate that they extend high into the troposphere and have cold cloud top temperatures.An infrared look by NASA's Aqua satellite on July 10, 2019 at 3:23 p.m. EDT (1923 UTC) revealed where the strongest storms were located within Potential Tropical Cyclone 2.The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed cloud top temperatures and found cloud top temperatures of strongest thunderstorms as cold as or colder than minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 53 degrees Celsius) circling the center (which is still not well-defined) and in thunderstorms northwest of the center, extending over southern Louisiana.
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Bourbon Street is halfway under water today.A weather system over the Gulf of Mexico dumped nearly 7 inches of rain on New Orleans in a matter of hours, forcing the National Weather Service (NWS) to declare a "flash flood emergency" as waters rose.This could be only the third time in the last 168 years (since researchers started keeping track) that a hurricane hits Louisiana in July, meteorologist Eric Holthaus wrote in the New Republic.Typically, August and September are peak hurricane season in the Gulf.Currently, the water sits at a height of 16 feet.ET today, the NWS had issued a storm surge watch for the area of the Louisiana coast between the mouth of the Pearl River and Intracoastal City.
A massive complex of thunderstorms over the southeastern United States slid into the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and now has the potential to develop into a tropical cyclone.NOAA's National Hurricane Center or NHC in Miami, Florida issued the first advisory of Potential Tropical Cyclone Two and NOAA's GOES-East satellite and NASA's GPM satellite provided views of the storm.On July 10 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), NOAA's GOES-East satellite provided a visible image of the developing storm.The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite passed over the developing area of low pressure early on July 10 and found rain was falling at a rate of more than 50 mm (about 2 inches) per hour.GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.NHC noted, "A tropical cyclone is expected to form by Thursday [July 11] over the north-central Gulf of Mexico.
Tropical Storm Cosme formed in the Eastern Pacific Ocean over the weekend of July 6 and 7 and after two days, the storm already weakened to a remnant low pressure area.NASA's Aqua satellite found the storm devoid of strong thunderstorms and appeared as a wispy ring of clouds.At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) on Saturday, July 6, Tropical Storm Cosme formed near latitude 15.6 degrees north and longitude 115.7 degrees west.That is about 630 miles (1,015 km) southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, Mexico.On July 8 at 6:15 a.m. EDT (1015 UTC), NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Cosme from space.The storm appeared to have a circulation of wispy high clouds.
If you’re looking to build a new home on coastal waters where hurricanes are known to roam, you might want to skip the two-by-fours and cement and instead start drinking bottled soda.A Canadian company has recently completed construction of a home with exterior walls made from recycled plastic, and it’s claimed to be able to withstand winds gusting at over 300 miles per hour.Built by JD Composites, the three bedroom home is situated near the Meteghan River in Nova Scotia.Aside from a distinct lack of trees, gardens, and neighbours, the house looks like any other dwelling with a clean modern design and a minimalist facade.Inside it’s fully furnished and finished with drywall covered lumber walls, but the exterior is what makes the house appealing as a new, and seemingly much improved, approach to construction.Wrapping the house, and providing its reinforced structure and extreme durability, are 5.9-inch thick panels made from somewhere around 612,000 plastic soda bottles that were shredded, melted, and then in injected with gas to create a sort of plastic based foam that has several key advantages over more traditional construction materials.
A satellite captured Tuesday's total solar eclipse as it passed near a Category 4 hurricane in the Pacific Ocean.The full eclipse was visible from parts of Chile and Argentina for more than two minutes.It was the first total solar eclipse since August 2017 and the only one this year.It grew into a Category 4 hurricane on Monday but has since begun to weaken.It is not expected to hit land.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
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