Call goes out to teach sailors all about phishing (and malware, and network security)Companies have until May 6 to make their pitch to the Navy Postgraduate School on exercises it can use with its course on Cyber Operations Fundamentals.Specifically, the school wants a contractor to develop lab exercises to go along with the yber Operations course.Those exercises should help to give the students a taste of what sort of attack techniques and situations they would face when pitted against both private and government-backed hackers in the field.In short, the cyber-security version of war games.From the sound of things, the class is designed to be an entry-level crash course for officers on the basics of infosecurity, encryption, and communications.
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A boxy blue car, like the old Volvo my dad used to drive, sits parked in a desolate lot in one of Simon Stålenhag’s dystopian illustrations.A young woman in white sweatpants, a hooded leather jacket, and red backpack stands on a nearby hill.It’s a familiar scene from my 90’s childhood — except the girl is holding hands with a bobble-headed robot and staring up at four animatronic ducks riddled with bullet holes from some recent wargame.It’s been a big year for Stålenhag, a Swedish digital artist who’s gained something of a cult (and Kickstarter) following for his evocative depictions of rural and suburban landscapes mixed with eerie science fiction elements.The narrative artbook follows the journey of a young traveler, Michelle, and her robot, Skip, as they head west to the Pacific coast through an alternative America torn apart by civil war and the trappings of military-grade virtual reality.With Amazon purchasing rights to Tales from the Loop, knowledge of your work has gone more mainstream.
Below the pleasant chirping of woodland birds and the rush of the river lies rot; the game’s forest is in upheaval and blood is about to be shed.The Eyrie, a crumbling royal houseThe birds of old ruled with integrity and pride, but the birds of now are a forgotten caste, swapping authority for tumult.Cards consist of different suits that map to clearing spaces on the forest board.As the Eyrie, you will program these cards into your tableau, then execute those actions in a specific order.Perhaps you place a bird card in recruit, a bunny in move, and a fox in battle.
Back in June, Electronic Arts and Dice introduced us to Battlefield V, and the companies teased the first-ever battle royale mode in a Battlefield game.Today, we have our first details on the mode, called Firestorm, and it looks like it will be appropriately intense.In a Battlefield V overview video that you can watch above, Electronic Arts shared just what will separate Firestorm from other games’ battle royale modes.In keeping with the squad-based tradition of the series, it will be comprised of 16 four-person squads, meaning it will feature the same number of players as most games’ Conquest mode, but it will take place on the largest map ever created for Battlefield.As we saw in a recent teaser, the playable zone is surrounded by a literal firestorm, which is quite a bit more intimidating than the magical force field we’ve seen in PlayerUknown’s Battlegrounds or storm in Fortnite.Firestorm will also include the same destructibility and vehicle-focused gameplay as most other Battlefield modes.
The next deadly disease that will cause a global pandemic is coming, Bill Gates said at a discussion of epidemics on Friday.A flu like the 1918 influenza pandemic could kill 30 million within six months, Gates said, and the next disease might not even be a flu, it might be something we've never seen.That could happen easily within the next decade.And as Bill Gates reminded listeners while speaking at a discussion about epidemics hosted by the Massachusetts Medical Society and the New England Journal of Medicine on Friday, we're not ready.As Gates said, he's usually the optimist in the room, reminding people that we're lifting children out of poverty around the globe and getting better at eliminating diseases like polio and malaria.According to one simulation by the Institute for Disease Modeling presented by Gates, a new flu like the one that killed 50 million in the 1918 pandemic would most likely kill 30 million within just six months now.
If you’re a Star Wars fan, you may have felt a recent disturbance in the Force.In fact, FFG already offers a dizzying array of games set in a galaxy far, far away.In the market for a mission-based game that plays like a sci-fi dungeon-crawler?Then there’s the collectible dice game, the four-hour galaxy-spanning epic, and the three separate tabletop RPGs.Star Wars: Legion is a miniatures battle game that pits armies of Rebel and Imperial troops against one another in deadly tactical combat.Where X-Wing and Armada let players fight it out in the cold void of space, this new release takes the action planetside, with ground-based clashes between forces of infantry, vehicles, and giant mechanical war-walkers.
Now the creator of Axis & Allies (as well as 200 other games) is about to unveil his most ambitious project yet.War Room is a sprawling tabletop board game for two to six players that’s been more than four years in the making.The 69-year-old Larry Harris, an avid WWII buff, teamed up with game designer Thomas Gale of Zoo Tycoon fame to form Nightingale Games.Their Kickstarter campaign has already doubled their initial funding goal with several days left to go.In an interview with Venture Beat, Harris explained that he wanted to make the complex nature of strategy and tactical wargames available to a wide audience.“I found that the games that were available to me as a young man were much too complicated and not very pleasing,” he said.
Steve Jackson is a legendary figure in the world of tabletop gaming.His company, Steve Jackson Games, was a prolific publisher of sci-fi themed wargames in the ‘70s and ‘80s with titles like Car Wars and GURPS, the “Generic Universal Role-Playing System.” Now, thanks to a monstrously successful Kickstarter campaign, one of the company’s biggest hits is available for PC on Steam.Tabletop wargaming is undergoing a renaissance right now, with new Kickstarter projects cropping up every month and games based on Fallout and Civilization hitting the market.Board games have proven to be the most popular game-related category on funding sites like Kickstarter and Indiegogo.The concept behind Ogre is simple enough – it’s an asymmetrical futuristic combat game, where one player controls the titular “Ogre” (a giant, nearly indestructible tank), while the other player wields a variety of conventional units such as hovercraft, infantry, and armor in a never-ending world war across irradiated battlefields.First released in 1977, the game was played on a hex grid with various terrain modifications using a large rulebook, damage charts, and multiple dice rolls.
Defence ministers have taken part in a cyberwar game aimed at making Europe better prepared for a major cyber attack.The scenario for the table-top wargame was a fictitious orchestrated cyber-attack against an EU-led military operation, involving both an EU headquarters in Rome and attacks on EU naval forces."The scope of the exercise is crisis response to a major offensive cyber campaign against EU military structures in a hybrid warfare context," said the European Defence Agency (EDA), which was one of the organisers of the exercise, along with the Estonian ministry of defence.During the course of the exercise, which lasted for two hours, defence ministers were sent information about various attacks that shut down part of the EU's military structure, and had a limited amount of time to make decisions on how to react.The objective of the session was to practice how ministers would respond to a cyber-attack against the EU's military organisations, and to help develop guidelines to be used in such a real-life crisis -- and to make ministers more aware of the potential effects of offensive cyber-campaigns."The cyber world and cyber threats do not recognise national boundaries or the barriers between organisations.
“If you know someone who has the basic brain power to comprehend Avalon Hill games, then get him to send us this postcard.”At the bottom of the card, that friend literally has to sign a sort of affidavit: “I swear that I have the necessary grey matter to enjoy your games.”As a sales tactic, this may be puzzling to modern eyes, but back in the pre-Internet, pre-console days, gaming saw itself as an elite hobby—something only for the nerdiest nerds.One of these bright spots was Dune, the cardboard adaption of Frank Herbert’s epic sci-fi novel.While it contains many wargame-like tropes, being a battle-heavy game of area control in which generals throw heaps of colored counters to their deaths, Dune was decades ahead of its time.Sadly, the Herbert estate proved reluctant to re-issue a license, forcing Fantasy Flight Games to antagonise purists with its shiny but thematically alien re-brand, called Rex, in 2012.
A new tabletop miniatures game is coming, starring your favourite Game of Thrones badasses, just in time for winter.CMON Limited has announced its plans for A Song of Ice and Fire: Tabletop Miniatures Game, a new miniatures wargame that lets fans of the books and show fight to the death in their quest to control the Seven Kingdoms.“This project allows us to dig deep into George R.R.Martin’s mind and recreate the iconic battles from his award-winning novels on the tabletop,” CMON’s founder and president David Doust said.A Song of Ice and Fire: Tabletop Miniatures Game has players pick their favourite Westerosi House and engage in “off-book conflicts of their own design,” although you can totally recreate famous fights from the series, like the Battle of the Bastards.Hell, if you want, you can change the entire story—get rid of the Red Wedding and have Robb Stark invade King’s Landing, or save King Joffrey so he can rule as a little shit-faced terror forever, long may he reign.
A new tabletop miniatures game is coming, starring your favourite Game of Thrones badasses, just in time for winter.CMON Limited has announced its plans for A Song of Ice and Fire: Tabletop Miniatures Game, a new miniatures wargame that lets fans of the books and show fight to the death in their quest to control the Seven Kingdoms.“This project allows us to dig deep into George R.R.Martin’s mind and recreate the iconic battles from his award-winning novels on the tabletop,” CMON’s founder and president David Doust said.A Song of Ice and Fire: Tabletop Miniatures Game has players pick their favourite Westerosi House and engage in “off-book conflicts of their own design,” although you can totally recreate famous fights from the series, like the Battle of the Bastards.Hell, if you want, you can change the entire story—get rid of the Red Wedding and have Robb Stark invade King’s Landing, or save King Joffrey so he can rule as a little shit-faced terror forever, long may he reign.
And it’s found a new way to fight World War II, eschewing the grand strategy and general’s-eye view of warfare it’s known for in the Hearts of Iront series for a more intimate battle — the hedgerow skirmish.Today, the Swedish company announced it would publish Steel Division: Normandy 44 from Eugen Systems, the French studio behind the Wargame series and R.U.S.E.It’ll have single-player and online modes, and the maps and units are as historically accurate as possible — down to the hedges, copied from aerial footage taken during recon of Normandy in World War II.“We’ve been doing real-time strategy for the last 17 years.We’ve done the Wargame series in the last five years.We’ve also done R.U.S.E., in 2010, which was a more accessible game.Recently we did Act of Aggression.His studio has been working on wargames since its founding in 2000.“What we’re doing with Steel Division is using the World War II setting and a great amount of history to build up a new experience.
Dubbed the Multi-Azimuth Defense – Fast Intercept Round Engagement System MAD-FIRES program, the proposed projectile will combine the precision and maneuverability of a smart missile with the rapid-fire capability of an artillery shell."MAD-FIRES aims to advance the state-of-the-art in defensive gun systems by creating a new, low-cost technological foundation for guided, gun-launched projectiles," said the agency."Specifically, MAD-FIRES aims to incorporate enhanced ammunition rounds able to alter their flight path in real time to stay on target, and a capacity to continuously target, track and engage multiple fast-approaching targets simultaneously and re-engage any targets that survive initial engagement."DARPA says the smarter munitions are needed to cope with smaller threats against US naval ships, such as small motorboats and drones.The dangers of these were amply demonstrated in the Millennium Challenge 2002 wargame, where basic missiles and small boats loaded with explosives successfully sank 19 US warships, including an aircraft carrier.The MAD-FIRES munitions need to be stored in large, relatively cheap quantities and must be like standard artillery.
Blackouts are one element of the cyber defence excercise scenarioMore than 700 security experts are battling a fictional cyber crisis featuring power cuts, drones and ransomware as part of the European Union's biggest cyber defence exercise to date.Cyber Europe 2016 kicked off back in April, as since then has been simulating the build up to a major cyber security crisis with a series of fictional attacks on European digital networks, culminating in this week's finale, where security industry experts from more than 300 organisations work together "to ensure business continuity and, ultimately, to safeguard the European Digital Single Market.""Computer security attacks are increasingly used to perform industrial reconnaissance, lead disinformation campaigns, manipulate stock markets, leak sensitive information, tamper with customer data, sabotage critical infrastructures," warns the scenario.The cyber wargame involves more than 700 experts across 30 countries from organisations such as governmental Computer Security Incident Response Teams, cybersecurity agencies, plus cloud service providers, IT security companies, banks, energy companies and other critical infrastructure operators, and is organised by the EU Agency for Network and Information Security ENISA .It said the exercise "pictures a very dark scenario" inspired by events such as the hacker-generated blackout in Ukraine in 2015 and the dependence on technologies manufactured outside of the EU.
But recently its drone research labs have come under cyber attack from unknown assailants, forcing Berylia to deploy rapid-reaction teams of security experts to its labs, under orders to find out what's happening, and to stop the attacks as quickly as possible.Over two hectic days, the teams will have to battle against mounting attacks on their systems, hijacking of their drones, and questions from a sometimes hostile press.The exercise is run from Estonia by NATO's cyberwarfare think tank, the Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence CCD COE .Berylia might be a fictional state, but Estonia itself has first hand experience of these sort of digital attacks: back in 2007 its banks and government systems suffered weeks of disruption from hackers after Estonian authorities proposed moving a Soviet war memorial.The wargame pits 20 'blue team' sets of defenders from NATO's member states, against a 'red team' of attackers which attempt to disrupt their networks.The teams are playing simultaneously but separately, so it is in some respects 20 games at once, although the teams are allowed to share some information.
Gen Con bills itself as "the best four days in gaming"—and in many ways, it is.This year, that game was Rob Daviau's SeaFall.As rumor has it, publisher Plaid Hat sold out of its limited copies even before the general public gained entry to the expo hall damn you, VIGs!For the uninitiated, legacy games are generally played by the same group of players over a number of sessions 15 or so, in this case because the game world permanently evolves due to players' actions and decisions.The game sold out almost immediately, and demo plays didn't offer full games, but what we saw of the opening was certainly intriguing.Though it looks like a big ol dudes-on-a-map wargame, it s much more of an intricate, puzzly Euro.
Where other franchises have accelerated their release schedules look at Football Manager or Total War, with their near-yearly games , Civilization has operated on a slow cycle.The first Civ was in 1991 and we've had a new one every five years since then.Civilization V was missing so much stuff at launch that it required two large expansions which introduced espionage, religion, and ideologies, and repaired the shoddy diplomacy system twice to match up to the series' high standards.This time it's Ed Beach, a former tabletop wargame designer, who's bringing his own big ideas to the series.Previously, if you wanted to attack someone's civilization rather than just their units, you had to butt up against a very hard target or mildly harass their mines and farms - after all, everyone defended their city centre tightly and strongly, meaning that warfare was direct and not tactical.But Beach, seemingly following Endless Legend's award-winning example, has decided to unbundle the city - so that key areas and buildings are no longer confined to the city centre, but are spread over the surrounding landscape.
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