Persil ProClean is returning to pro football’s biggest night for the fourth consecutive year.The detergent brand will bring back The Professional, a pitchman who wants to help you clean your clothing, to the Super Bowl on Feb. 3 on CBS.A brand spokesperson confirmed to Adweek that it is returning to the Big Game with an ad featuring the recurring character, who has been played by Younger actor Peter Hermann.DDB New York will handle creative for the spot.The brand and the agency did not share creative details, when the spot will air or the spot length.DDB New York teamed up with directors Tim Heidecker and Eric Wareheim (of Tim & Eric Awesome Show, Great Job!
4
Throughout the first day of CES, the DT crew roamed the halls of the convention center, seeking out strange inventions and fascinating people, while Digital Trends Live broadcast all day long from our very own booth, with appearances from a variety of guests.Resolve wants to catch poachers before they strikeThe first guest of the day was Eric Dinerstein, director of Biodiversity and Wildlife Solutions at a nonprofit organization called Resolve that for over 30 years has been focused on environmental and public health issues.To achieve its goals, Resolve partners with powerful corporations such as Intel, whose artificial intelligence tech is present in Resolve’s new TrailGuard system.Developed in collaboration with the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and National Geographic, TrailGuard is a motion-activated camera designed to keep watch over wildlife refuges.Using the power of Intel’s Movidius vision processing unit, the camera takes photos when it detects movement, analyzes those photos, and if it catches something important (such as poachers), alerts park rangers.
4
At CES 2019 we've seen super-thin laptops, laptops with impossibly slim bezels and big-but-thin laptops.We've even seen desktop hardware crammed into a laptop.So why not a desktop gaming PC that's smaller than a laptop?Enter the Mek Mini -- a $1,500 gaming powerhouse that measures roughly 10 x 10 x 5 inches.It's smaller than a 12-pack of beer and, having cradled it in my arms, I'd estimate that it weighs around six or seven pounds.While it's not as compact as the Mac Mini, the Mek Mini is tiny compared to most other gaming desktop PCs.
3
The Honor View 20 may be Huawei's only phone at CES 2019 (and, in fact, the only satisfying phone of the entire show), but the company threw in a bonus device.Or rather, a bonus color for the Honor 8X: Phantom Blue.Take a look at the photos below: it's pretty.What makes the color "phantom" is the shifting quality of its finish, which shifts from blue to purple and pink when it catches the light.It's a technique that Huawei and other Chinese rivals have used on phones in 2018 to eye-catching effect.The Huawei P20 Pro was one particularly successful example and uses a similar color gradient as the new Honor 8X shade.
4
Sharp, a company known for TVs, displays, and electronics, is currently displaying a prototype of an 8K prosumer camera at CES 2019 — a camera that could be one of the first 8K cameras, with a prosumer price under $5,000.The prototype camera doesn’t yet have a full name or specifications, though those details are expected during the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) conference in April.The camera that’s on display at CES uses an Olympus lens, suggesting a Micro Four Thirds sensor inside.The camera is also said to include image stabilization.Sharp says the camera can shoot 8K at 30 fps, but that the company is aiming to reach 60 fps.The camera also uses the H.265 codec and has an SD card slot, and HDMI and USB connections, along with headphone, microphone, and mini XLR ports.
8
Lifx is adding color-changing candelabra bulbs to its lineup of smart LED lights, the company tells me at CES 2019 in Las Vegas.Pricing isn't set yet, but Lifx expects them to launch in the third quarter of 2019.What makes these lights especially interesting is that they can put out multiple colors at once -- a fairly uncommon feature, even among larger-sized smart bulbs.That lets them simulate a flickering flame, or put out some of the same animated, tie-dye-type effects that you get with the multi-color Lifx Tile wall panels.The controls for the bulbs are similar to the Tiles, too.Along with controlling and automating them, you'll be able to paint designs onto each bulb by dragging your finger over a bulb-shaped canvas in the Lifx app.
3
Ubisoft, the developer of the highly anticipated game "The Division 2," will release the game in the Epic Games store instead of the most popular online platform for PC games, Steam.The creators of "Fortnite" scored a big win over the world's biggest PC gaming platform when they convinced a major publisher to make one of the biggest PC releases of the year exclusive to their online store.Ubisoft will launch "Tom Clancy's The Division 2" on March 15 in the Epic Games Store and on Ubisoft's own Uplay service."As long-time fans and partners of Ubisoft, we're thrilled to bring a range of awesome Ubisoft games to the Epic Games store," Epic founder and CEO Tim Sweeney said in a statement."Tom Clancy's The Division 2"/UbisoftEpic launched their digital storefront a month ago, offering developers a larger percentage of sales revenue than the competition.
3
German supplier Bosch has entered the race to connect the world.The company aims to become a leading provider of mobility services, and it created a division named Smart Mobility Solutions in 2018 to fast-track its projects.Digital Trends sat down with Bernd Heinrichs, the executive vice president and chief digital officer of Smart Mobility Solutions, during CES 2019 to learn more about the company’s vision for a connected future.Digital Trends: 5G is the talk of the show at CES.Bernd Heinrichs: In my view, I0T consists of four pieces.You have the things that are connected, the data they generate, the processes that analyze it, and the humans who digest it.
7
Google's Chrome browser this summer will start blocking those annoying ads around the globe.Chrome will protect users from intrusive ads in any country starting on July 9, according to Google's Chromium blog.It's an expansion to an ad-blocking feature launched in February last year that initially focused on sites in North America and Europe.The ad-blocker is designed to dissuade publishers from obnoxious ad practices defined by a consortium called Coalition for Better Ads through its Better Ads Standards.Google analyzes sites and warns those with overly intrusive ads that they'll be added to a blacklist if they don't change their ways.Starting Wednesday, publishers worldwide can use the Ad Experience Report tool to check if they've displayed intrusive ads on their sites.
6
I'm not saying you need a big TV to be happy.I'm saying you need a big TV to be happi.If you're about ready for an upgrade, you've come to the right month: January is a great time to shop for a new TV, because stores typically hold sales in advance of the playoffs and Super Bowl.I'd consider a 55-inch screen the bare minimum for party-friendly football viewing.It's not a particularly well-reviewed TV.TCL 55-inch Series 4 Roku TV: $320 (save $60)
7
Wireless customers are still flocking to T-Mobile.That's the takeaway from preliminary fourth quarter results the company announced Wednesday.The Bellevue, Washington company said it added a total of 2.4 million customers in the fourth quarter of which 1.4 million were so-called postpaid monthly wireless customers.These are customers, who pay their bills at the end of each month and are considered highly valuable.Analysts had expected the company to add 985,000 new postpaid subscribers, according to Bloomberg.Just yesterday, Verizon also announced strong customer growth for the fourth quarter.
1
Astronomers look to be getting closer to solving one of the more recent and bizarre mysteries in the universe.For just the second time, scientists have picked up a strange radio signal from the other side of the cosmos called a "fast radio burst," or FRB, that repeats itself, making it possible to trace the very brief but powerful signal back to a source.A new Canadian radio telescope picked up a fresh batch of FRBs as it was beginning operations in the middle of 2018, including a new repeater that is clearly distinct from FRB 112102."We don't know the precise distance to the second one yet."Tendulkar is a post-doctoral fellow at McGill university and member of the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) radio telescope team that made the new discovery, which will be presented Wednesday at the semi-annual American Astronomical Society meeting in Seattle and published in a pair of papers in the journal Nature.And with more repeaters and more sources available for study, we may be able to understand these cosmic puzzles -- where they're from and what causes them," said Ingrid Stairs, another member of the CHIME collaboration and an astrophysicist at the University of British Columbia, in a statement.
2
Amazon and Wayfair boast different strengths, but Wayfair ultimately offers a more straightforward furniture-shopping experience.These days, people who need furniture and hate shopping have a ton of options.Amazon got its start shipping books, but it now offers all sorts of goods across different categories.Wayfair specializes in home goods and furnishings.Business Insider recently decided to compare the two companies when it comes to shopping for furniture.To narrow things down and locate some futon options without using Amazon's search function, you've got to head to the sidebar on the page's left-hand side.
2
At least 115 people die every day in the U.S. after overdosing on opioids, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse.And in 2016, illegal injectable opioids became the most common drug involved in overdose-related deaths.The team will publish its results Jan. 9 in Science Translational Medicine."The idea is that people can use the app during opioid use so that if they overdose, the phone can potentially connect them to a friend or emergency services to provide naloxone," said co-corresponding author Shyam Gollakota, an associate professor in the UW's Paul G. Allen School of Computer Science & Engineering."Here we show that we have created an algorithm for a smartphone that is capable of detecting overdoses by monitoring how someone's breathing changes before and after opioid use."The Second Chance app sends inaudible sound waves from the phone to people's chests and then monitors the way the sound waves return to the phone to look for specific breathing patterns.
6
IL-2 is a potent anticancer drug and an effective treatment for autoimmune disease, but its toxic side effects have limited its clinical usefulness.In a paper in the Jan. 10 issue of the journal Nature, the researchers report using computer programs to design a protein that they have shown in animal models to have the same ability to stimulate cancer-fighting T-cells as the naturally occurring IL-2, but without triggering harmful side effects.The achievement opens new approaches to the design of protein-based therapeutics for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases and other disorders, the researchers said.The new protein has been dubbed Neo-2/15 because, in addition to mimicking the effect of IL-2, the protein can also mimic the effect of another interleukin, IL-15, which is being studied as another possible anticancer immunotherapy."People have tried for 30 years to alter IL-2 to make it safer and more effective, but because naturally occurring proteins tend not to be very stable, this has proved to be very hard to do," said a lead author of the paper, Daniel-Adriano Silva, an IPD biochemist.Because we designed it from scratch, we understand all its parts, and we can continue to improve it making it even more stable and active."
2
A small percentage of Americans, less than 9 percent, shared links to so-called "fake news" sites on Facebook during the 2016 presidential election campaign, but this behavior was disproportionately common among people over the age of 65, finds a new analysis by researchers at New York University's Social Media and Political Participation (SMaPP) Lab and Princeton University."Despite widespread interest in the fake news phenomenon, we know very little about who actually shares fake news," says Joshua Tucker, a professor of politics at NYU and co-director of the SMaPP Lab."Perhaps most significantly, we find that sharing this type of content on Facebook was a relatively rare activity during the 2016 presidential campaign."In explaining their findings, the researchers outline how the correlation with age could reflect differences in more fundamental traits or skills -- such as digital media literacy -- that are theoretically related to social media sharing behavior.Exploring these possibilities, they note, should be a focus of future research.By contrast, education, income, and gender were not systematically related to being more likely to share fake news, the study found.
4
Although most Facebook users did not share any fake news articles during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, a new study reveals that the small number who did were mostly Americans over the age of 65.The findings suggest the need for renewed attention to educate particular vulnerable subgroups, such as those over the age of 65, about fake news.So-called fake news - false, misleading information that appears to resemble a news article - gained prominence during and after the 2016 U.S. presidential election, and scientists have raised concerns about fake news' spread and its influence over public discourse.However, much remains unknown about the mechanics behind the spread of fake news during the election.To shed light on the individual-level characteristics associated with sharing false articles, Andrew Guess and colleagues disseminated an online survey to 3,500 people in three different waves throughout the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign.Of the respondents, 1,331 of the initial wave agreed to share their Facebook profile data, which allowed the authors to link their survey responses to the respondents' Facebook sharing history during 2016.
4
A Canadian-led team of scientists has found the second repeating fast radio burst (FRB) ever recorded.FRBs are short bursts of radio waves coming from far outside our Milky Way galaxy.Scientists believe FRBs emanate from powerful astrophysical phenomena billions of light years away.The discovery of the extragalactic signal is among the first, eagerly awaited results from the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), a revolutionary radio telescope inaugurated in late 2017 by a collaboration of scientists from the University of British Columbia, McGill University, University of Toronto, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, and the National Research Council of Canada.In a resounding endorsement of the novel telescope's capabilities, the repeating FRB was one of a total of 13 bursts detected over a period of just three weeks during the summer of 2018, while CHIME was in its pre-commissioning phase and running at only a fraction of its full capacity.And with more repeaters and more sources available for study, we may be able to understand these cosmic puzzles--where they're from and what causes them," said Ingrid Stairs, a member of the CHIME team and an astrophysicist at UBC.
4
Jan. 9, 2019, San Francisco, CA - On the final day of the largest biotechnology and pharmaceutical partnering week at the Juvenescence Longevity Showcase two leading longevity biotechnology companies, Elevian and Insilico Medicine announced a research and development partnership to develop oral medications targeting the GDF11 pathway and associated targets.Insilico Medicine is an Artificial Intelligence (AI) company developing an end-to-end pipeline for automated target identification, small molecule generation, prediction of clinical trials outcomes and aging research.The collaboration will take advantage of Insilico's generative adversarial networks (GANs) and reinforcement learning (RL) AI technologies to discover novel small molecules that target the GDF11 pathway, which has been demonstrated to play an important role in aging and age-related disease.GDF11 is an exciting pathway and Elevian's scientists are world leaders in this field coming from Harvard and other prestigious institutions.Their management has a solid vision and is committed to doing great research and turn it into the life-saving products in record time," said Alex Zhavoronkov, PhD, founder and CEO of Insilico MedicineIn order to succeed in this endeavor, the companies will utilize state of the art techniques in AI-enabled drug discovery.
5
Scientists from Skoltech and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) studied the protein and lipid composition of a mammoth bone found near the Yana River in northeastern Siberia.Their study is one of the few pioneering endeavors in paleolipidomics -- a frontier research area that comes to complement paleogenomics and paleoproteomics.The results of their study were published in the European Journal of Mass Spectrometry.Advanced methods of genetic analysis have made it possible to study DNA extracted from fossilized bones, giving rise to a whole new trend in science, paleogenetics, that has helped crack a lot of evolutionary mysteries.Nevertheless, genetics alone is hardly enough to get a full picture of the animals that inhabited the Earth long before humans.This is why at some point paleogenomics was joined by paleoproteomics that studies ancient proteins.
4
More

Top