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aayush kalse

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Not at all.New figures released by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) show that there are over 460 million people living with diabetes worldwide today.That’s a significant proportion of the world’s population, and globally, diabetes is one of the top ten causes of death.1 This shows it’s now more important than ever that people know how to prevent and manage this chronic and life-changing disease.The good news is that type 2 diabetes can, in many cases, be delayed, prevented, or even reversed.1 Making simple lifestyle changes, such as exercising regularly, maintaining a ‘healthy’ weight, reducing the amount of refined sugar in your diet, reducing alcohol consumption and smoking, or taking a suitable medication, can help reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.Yet so few people are aware of this, it’s alarming.An international survey of over 9,000 people we conducted at Merck across 9 countries for World Diabetes Day showed a worrying lack of awareness: Over half (56%) of respondents were not aware the condition can be prevented and 41% were unaware of the steps that can be taken to prevent or delay its development.Professor Nam H. Cho, Immediate Past President at the IDF, comments: “We are proud of our ongoing collaboration with Merck.We are delighted with the high engagement at our IDF Congress this year, where the global diabetes community is united again to share best practice and debate issues related to this life-changing condition.”When we caught up with Professor Ian Campbell, Emeritus Professor of Medicine, University of St Andrews, UK, at the IDF Congress in Busan, South Korea, he added “We know that type 2 diabetes, and the complications associated with it, are on the rise in most countries.
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