Albert Hummel

Albert Hummel

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The TicWatch Pro 3 could be the most powerful Wear OS watch, at least for a while.
(European Molecular Biology Laboratory) German researchers, including scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg (EMBL), developed a machine learning-based algorithm to study the morphogenesis of plants at a cellular level. So far it was impossible to solve this evolving and changing puzzle.
Everyone who isn't Facebook, Twitter, YouTube or Snap seems to want a piece of TikTok.
The Nubia Red Magic 5S was revealed in China during the last month. Now, the latest gaming smartphone from Nubia is coming for International markets ... The post Red Magic 5S is now up for pre-orders globally appeared first on Gizchina.com.
Around the world, business schools are scrambling to improve their online courses as the COVID-19 pandemic wreaks havoc on an already struggling sector.  Last year, the top 10 business schools in the US reported a 7% decline in applications, and 30% of this year's Harvard Business School candidates have opted to defer their studies until 2021.  One senior academic told Business Insider many schools were struggling to convince students to commit to online learning, adding: "If you're not Harvard Business School, you're f---ed."  Executive education startup Jolt said it had held talks with a number of leading business schools about helping to improve their online offerings.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Business schools around the world are scrambling to improve their online offerings amid fears the COVID-19 pandemic will leave them struggling to attract students.   The executive education sphere was facing an crisis before the pandemic, with the US's top 10 business schools reporting a 7% decline in applications year-on-year in 2019. And while applications have historically risen in times of uncertainty, with students using education to ride out difficult economic circumstances, COVID-19 travel restrictions and social distancing requirements could make 2020 a tough year.  Education providers of all stripes have switched to online learning, and it remains unclear whether institutions will be able to convince students their courses will prove just as enriching when taken from home.  Most business schools have yet to publish stats for the coming fall semester intake, but earlier this year Harvard Business School revealed around 30% of students accepted onto its MBA programme had chosen to defer their studies until the following year.  Applications to the world's oldest business school ESCP, which has campuses in six major cities across Europe, have risen, according to director of executive education Prof Peter Stephenson-Wright — but prospective students remain hesitant to follow through on their commitment. "If anything, the number of applicants is up – and the quality of those applications is incredibly high," he told Business Insider. "But people are quite uncertain about making the final commitment, and some are asking what options they have in terms of deferring enrolment."  Many students are worried they won't get full value from a remote degree. A November analysis by Poets&Quants, a forum and community group targeting business school students, showed the total price tag of an MBA, including room and board and other fees, had ballooned to more than $200,000 at a dozen institutions. "Many [business] schools have relied on their reputation to keep a steady flow of students coming in," the group added. "But a huge part of exec education is the networking opportunities – I don't think people are willing to pay $200,000 for a degree over Zoom."  One senior lecturer at a well-known US business school, who spoke to Business Insider on the condition of anonymity in order to avoid enflaming tensions with colleagues, said the "unreasonable costs" of traditional MBA programmes could put many students off applying to all but the most prestigious institutions. "If you're not Harvard Business School, you're f---ed," they said. Competition was already on the rise before the pandemic broke out, with e-learning companies such as Jolt and Hyper Island offering relatively affordable forms of executive education.  Roei Deutsch, Jolt cofounder and CEO, told Business Insider his firm had held talks with a number of leading business schools across the globe about helping them revamp their online offering.  "There are different models that fit different institutions and challenges," Deutsch said, adding that discussions had included operating an entire "business school as a service" for one university, and white-labelling its tech for another.  Deutsch said the best-known institutions still offered students access to an "elitist club." "That hasn't changed much so they are the most resilient to this crisis. But other schools have recognized that they'll have to completely disrupt themselves to survive. "We'll see some of them flourish and jump up the ranks through inovation, or shut down and lose their spot." SEE ALSO: Before COVID-19, online learning was dying out — but now profits at companies like Udacity are soaring. We spoke to experts about how the pandemic has changed the sector's future. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
A group of citizen scientists has discovered 95 "cool worlds" near the sun, celestial objects much larger than planets but lighter than stars, known as brown dwarfs, according to a new study.
Discover the best ways of inciting mayhem in Grand Theft Auto 5 through these cheat codes and secret missions.
(NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center) NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a nighttime view of Tropical Depression 13 early on Aug. 21. By 11 a.m. EDT, it had strengthened into Tropical Storm Laura.
At some point during the 2020 model year, Ford even added the active safety tech to the base F-150 XL.
Without any batteries or electronics at all, this 88-milligram autonomous robotic insect can walk for hours
Commercial 5G services have been live for more than a year. By the end of Q2 this year over 70 mobile operators across more than 40 countries had launched 5G. It is therefore a good time for the industry to take stock of 5G’s performance in its first year and start looking towards what should […]
There’s a saying that goes “what’s old is new again” and it definitely applies to fashion and design trends. Smartphones aren’t immune to that adage either, and the upcoming iPhone 12 might be a prime example of that. Despite sporting somewhat modern design cues like the notch from the 2017 iPhone X, Apple’s 2020 line will be traveling back to … Continue reading
On August 17, 2021, a year from the publishing of this article, Microsoft will sound the death knell for Internet Explorer. As of that date, Internet Explorer 11 will no longer be supported by many of Microsoft’s own services, including Outlook, OneDrive, Office 365, and more, according to a post on the Microsoft 365 Blog. Microsoft is also ending support for Internet Explorer in Teams even earlier: November 30 of this year. That said, the browser isn’t totally going away; there’s no word on when Internet Explorer will be removed from Windows 10 itself, and businesses will still be able to access… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Microsoft
Microsoft is testing a price comparison tool and coupon autofill feature which will make online shopping even easier for Edge users.
Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick hosted a party at his Los Angeles home amid a surge in coronavirus cases in the region, according to Vanity Fair.  The party was "smaller" that past parties Kalanick has hosted and took place outside, Vanity Fair reports.  California has seen a spike in coronavirus cases, particularly in the southern part of the state. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom rolled back reopening in the state, and in Los Angeles County, large gatherings are currently only permitted with members of your household. Vanity Fair reports that many millionaires and billionaires have continued to host and attend parties and travel the world amid the coronavirus outbreak.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As coronavirus cases have continued to climb in California, ex-Uber CEO Travis Kalanick threw a party at his Los Angeles home.  That's according to Vanity Fair's Nick Bilton, who reported being asked if he was going to a party at Kalanick's house "a couple of weeks ago." Vanity Fair reports that the party was held outdoors and was "smaller" that past parties Kalanick has hosted.  But the party reportedly took place amid a surge in coronavirus cases in Southern California. Though California was one of the first states to lockdown, it has recently seen an increase in new cases, including a spike in July. According to The New York Times, the state has seen 628,500 confirmed cases to date, including 221,950 in Los Angeles County.  California initially began to reopen earlier this year as the number of cases statewide held steady. But in mid-July, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced he was rolling back reopening plans, shutting down indoor dining, movie theaters, zoos, and museums, and shutting down bars completely.  In Los Angeles County, large gatherings are currently only permitted with members of your household, according to the Los Angeles Times.  Kalanick did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment.  Kalanick served as Uber's CEO until 2017, when he left company following a wave of allegations about the company's culture, including hard partying and sexual harassment. In 2018, Kalanick launched his own venture fund, 10100, which is focused on "large-scale job creation." He's currently building Cloud Kitchens, a secretive startup that rents shared kitchens for restaurants to serve the delivery market.  But Kalanick isn't the only billionaire who's been partying amid the coronavirus outbreak, according to Vanity Fair. One billionaire who also lives in Los Angeles was reportedly administering quick COVID-19 tests to dinner party guests before they could come inside, while a group of venture capitalists reportedly rented a $500,000-a-month Palm Springs party house.  Other high-profile execs have traveled amid the virus outbreak, including billionaire David Geffen, who was slammed for posting about self-isolating onboard his $590 million superyacht, Rising Sun, in March. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
The Ying to Steve Jobs' Yang celebrates another orbit around the Sun Steve Wozniak, Apple co-founder and star engineer of the computer revolution, turns 70 today. How do you sum up such a storied career, which continues to touch facets of our daily lives? We should start at the beginning.…
While the shift to cloud continues to be a major trend within our industry, it remains the case that different organizations are performing that migration in vastly different ways.  The firms that typically attract the headlines are those that have undergone a root-and-branch transformation. After all, the story of a complete overhaul and radical restructuring along cloud-native lines is a compelling one.However, this is far from the only narrative in the marketplace. Not every business is on the same trajectory toward cloud adoption, and an extensive hinterland of applications and companies still have not moved to the cloud. In addition, there exists a major subset of companies that have migrated only partially, or in a way that closely resembles their historic technology practices — the “lift and shift” approach.To read this article in full, please click here
Photo by Sam Byford / The Verge Nvidia is teasing a mysterious announcement for August 31st. The graphics card maker is hinting a potential event on Twitter today, with a post that simply says “#UltimateCountdown,” accompanied by a video of a star going supernova. Nvidia has also updated its GeForce Twitter account header image with another teaser that mentions “21 days. 21 years.” The supernova tease makes it clear that whatever Nvidia is planning to announce, it’s going to be big news, and it may come in 21 days’ time. Nvidia’s teaser comes just days after rumors suggested the company might be planning to launch its new Ampere graphics cards on September 9th. Nvidia is rumored to be launching RTX 3000 Series cards and presumably a GeForce RTX 3080 successor to the... Continue reading…
Thousands of NHS workers are gathering on the streets in towns and cities across the UK to demand a pay rise following the peak of the coronavirus crisis. Health service staff were excluded from the wage increase for around 900,000 public sector workers announced a couple of weeks ago because they are in the final year of a three-year pay deal.Instead they are due a pay rise next April, but unions want the government to show its appreciation for NHS staff by bringing it forward to this year.More than 500 health workers have died so far following exposure to coronavirus.Now they will be staging socially-distanced protests to demand the government recognises their role in the Covid-19 fight through higher wages.Protesters have been gathering in St James’ Park in London since 11am, and plan to march along Whitehall to Downing Street and end with a rally in Parliament Square.Another 30 demonstrations have been organised in towns and cities across the country – including, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Liverpool, Newcastle and Sheffield.Unite national officer for health, Jackie Williams, said: “In a decade of Tory austerity, NHS staff has seen their pay cut by 20% in real terms – and no amount of Thursday evening clapping and warm ministerial words can compensate for this dramatic loss in income.”A recent survey by Unison suggested more than two-thirds (69%) of people think all NHS employees should be awarded a rise this year.Claudia Webbe, Labour MP for Leicester East, said: “This crisis has shown that the people who really matter and keep our society ticking are not billionaires and the super-rich, but nurses, carers, cleaners, checkout attendants and many more essential frontline workers.”She added: “We can no longer live in a society where health workers are underpaid, frontline workers are undervalued or our NHS is starved of funding.”The Met Police said it had a policing strategy in place to cover the protests, adding: “We are aware that a number of people may wish to demonstrate this weekend – we would always ask them to engage with us.” Related... Nurse Challenges 'Coward' Boris Johnson To Join Her On Shift During NHS Pay Rise March Families Of These Covid Victims Want You To Know Who They Were
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