Albert Hummel

Albert Hummel

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The electric car race has been on since 2010, but it's now essentially over, and Tesla has won: CEO Elon Musk's automaker dominates the EV market But that market remains tiny, at just about 2% of global sales. Musk knows that for Tesla's grand vision to succeed, that share has to grow exponentially. Winning the EV race means that for Tesla, the real work of eliminating the internal-combustion engine has just begun. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The idea that automakers are racing to commercialize electric cars — and that one or some of them will come out on top — has always been flawed.  For starters, the auto industry is huge: More than a billion passenger vehicles are roaming the planet, with another 80 million or so joining them every year. No single victor could satisfy that level of demand. This was obvious even in the early days of the auto industry, when scores of carmakers, engine-makers, and coachbuilders were competing to put Americans and Europeans behind the wheel. Yes, there were obvious winners and losers: Henry Ford captured a huge amount of market share early on with his Model T, then General Motors grew itself into a competitor and took the lead. But more than a century on, both are carrying on, more or less fine. That's not how races work.  In the 20th century, plenty of other famous names got in on the action. Vanished marques, such as Studebaker and Nash. Mid-century upstarts like Chrysler. The Europeans were always a factor: Mercedes, BMW, Fiat, Ferrari, Rolls-Royce, Aston Martin, Rover, Vauxhall, Renault, Citroën. Mighty Volkswagen. After World War II, a surge of Japanese nameplates rolled in: Toyota, Honda, Mitsubishi, Nissan, Mazda, Subaru. The point is that on a planet populated by billions of people, a significant percentage of whom aspire to personal mobility, you need a lot of automakers to satisfy demand and to share the risks of trying to meet it.  That was the internal-combustion era, however. Which still makes up roughly 98% of the global market. Meanwhile, on the electrified front — 2% of worldwide sales — there's already a clear winner: Tesla. A single statistic tells the story. Nissan's Leaf, an EV that arrived in 2010 before Tesla's Model S followed in 2012, had sold just over 400,000 units, all time. Tesla is now closing in on a million, for the five vehicles it has marketed since its founding (the original Roadster, Model S, Model X, Model 3, and Model Y). Tesla has a near-monopoly of a tiny market, then. The race, such as it is, has ended, and Tesla can declare victory. But here's the thing: CEO Elon Musk knows the race is the wrong narrative, the one that doesn't matter. Here's why:FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! After Elon Musk sold his stake in PayPal to eBay in 2002, he took his personal payday — hundred of millions — and sunk it into several companies, including Tesla, which at the time was barely making any cars. Electric vehicles weren't unprecedented. They had been around since the dawn of the auto age, and in the 1990s, General Motors took the bold step of launching the EV1, an EV with slightly more than 100 miles of range. The EV1 used a nickel-metal hydride battery design, the best option available at the time. GM only leased the EV1 to customers, and eventually ended the program. Tesla's battery design was rather different. It wired together thousands of lithium-ion cells to create a battery pack that required an intricate cooling system. But it yielded a range that was competitive with gas vehicles. The original Roadster was Tesla's first product, and it was impressive. Based on a Lotus chassis, the two-seater could do 0 to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds, with double the range of the EV1. Tesla never sold a lot of Roadsters, but the price was high enough to generate revenue to build the company's first "clean sheet" design, the Model S, unveiled in 2012. (Tesla also had a Department of Energy loan, plus equity investments from Daimler and Toyota adding to a 2010 IPO that raised about $260 million). The Model X SUV followed in 2015. For Musk, it was imperative to sell high-priced, luxury EVs to fund his Master Plan: an affordable EV for the masses. That car arrived in all-important Model 3, which hit the streets in 2017. By 2020, it made up the bulk of Tesla's sales, which had hit more than 250,000 annually. The Model Y was next, revealed in 2019. With this car, Tesla was taking on the booming market for crossover SUVs in the US. Musk expected it to outsell the Model 3 in the long-run. Tesla also announced a new Roadster, this time with a 0 to 60 mph time of under two seconds. Tesla hasn't yet built it, but for loyalists who took a chance on the original Roadster, it's going to be the must-have "halo" Tesla. And in late 2019, Tesla showcased the wild Cybertruck, a massive departure from its design language. The goal was clear: GM, Ford, and FCA sell around three million full-size pickups every year. Replace them with electric pickups and you've made a major dent in the internal-combustion engine's hegemony. While all this was going on, the rest of the auto industry was gradually figuring out its own EV agenda. The Nissan Leaf had launched in 2010, before the Model S. It was basically the only long-range EV available for several years. Designer Henrik Fisker was seen as a direct Tesla rival in the early 2010s, with his Karma sedan. But the company went bankrupt in 2013. General Motors launched the Chevy Bolt EV in 2016, beating Tesla's mass-market Model 3 to market. That didn't concern him — with GM back in the game, his vision had a far better chance of becoming a reality. The Jaguar I-PACE was in the first wave of luxury EVs that took on the Model S and Model X. It arrived in 2018 and offered about 250 miles of range. Audi rolled out its E-tron SUV in 2018, as well; it now delivers just over 200 miles of range. Porsche unveiled its Taycan in 2019, and announced that it would have close to 300 miles of range, and — more importantly — be a proper high-performance EV. It would also be priced accordingly: $185,000 for the top-dog Turbo S version. New startups also entered the fray. Rivian took the auto show circuit by storm in 2019, showcasing an ell-electric SUV and pickup truck, angling to capture the same buyers Tesla was targeting with the Cybertruck. Post-Chevy Bolt EV, General Motors committed to an ambitious electric strategy. The automaker revived the Hummer nameplate, making it an electric pickup to be sold under the GMC brand. In fact, GM has declared that its future is electric. In early 2020, CEO Mary Barra announced a new "Ultium" battery technology and said the company would introduce 22 new electrified vehicles by 2023. Crosstown Detroit rival Ford wasn't sitting entirely still. Last year, it announced that it would extend its Mustang brand for the first time since 1965. The all-electric Mustang Mach-E was the result. It goes on sale later this year. But of course, the big news from Ford was that an all-electric F-150 pickup was on the way, hitting the road in 2022. A game-changer? Possibly. The gas-powered F-150 has been the bestselling vehicle in the US since 1982. In 2019, Ford sold nearly a million F-Series trucks. Despite all these new entries, Tesla's lead remains huge. It's currently opening, building, or preparing to build three new factories on three continents. Its market capitalization, at about $260 billion, is more than those of Ford, GM, and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles — combined. Musk has taken the company from essentially nothing to be the most valuable automaker in the world, in less than 20 years. But he wasn't allowing himself to think that winning the EV race meant that his work was done. He was, at best, only at the beginning of fulfilling his master plans. With the US and European markets mature, the China market was the world's major growth opportunity. It could have 40 million in annual vehicle sales at some point in the future — more than twice the size of the US market. Electric vehicles are considered a key alternative to adding millions of polluting cars and trucks to the country's fleet. If they replace enough gas vehicles, EVs could slow climate change, an important goal for Musk. Transportation and energy generation are two of the biggest generators of greenhouse emissions. For Musk, the master plan isn't to be the biggest manufacturer of EVs — it's to accelerate humanity's exit from the fossil-fuels age, and to convince other automakers and innovators that the market for electric cars is viable. Tesla could be selling millions of vehicles every year by the end of the decade, staying far ahead of its sundry rivals. But what matters more is that those millions in annual sales grow the EV market from 2% today to more than 50% by 2030 — and possibly far more than that.
The job market was changing even before COVID-19 pushed the global economy into the abyss. If you find yourself out of work, underemployed, or simply ready for a new direction, now may be the perfect time to learn skills to help you enter the tech industry. A tech certification can be a faster, more affordable way to open the door to a new career, compared to say, a college degree. Below, we've got a running list of all the most valuable tech certifications and the typical salaries of those who hold them, according to various sites that track salary data. With the economy in tatters, many people are looking around for a new career in the high-paying tech industry. And a certification is a very good way to get there, as many of them are associated with jobs that pay over $100,000. Please note that a single certification itself won't instantly lead to a job with a six-digit salary. Salary depends on experience, job responsibilities, other education and certifications, location, and job title. And, obviously, the certifications associated with the highest-paying jobs tend to be held by people who have more years of experience and multiple certifications. In addition, certifications will expire — and need to be renewed — after one to three years.  Also, a potential salary alone can't predict the right career path for anyone. People should start with the kind of tech that most interests them. Is it the cloud, marketing software, networking, programming, or app development?  View this list more like a compass than a starting point. It can help you get an understand of how much you can make and what types of jobs and certifications you would need to get there. Annual salary estimates are calculated based on proprietary databases or surveys from ZipRecruiter and Global Knowledge Training.SEE ALSO: Enterprise tech salaries revealed: How much Oracle, IBM, SAP, Cisco, Dell, VMware, ServiceNow and Workday pay engineers, developers, data scientists and others CCNP: $107,293 Name of certification: Cisco Certified Network Professional Enterprise (CCNP) Description: The CCNP certification is the perquisite prior to the expert level. This credential certifies proficiency with computer networking on Cisco's products and is the new replacement, as of February 2020, to the popular CCNP Routing and Switching cert. How much it may cost to get it: $600 for two exams; prep courses can run between $2,000 and $4,295.  Potential salary: $107,293 Difficulty level in obtaining: This is a mid-level certification that requires several perquisites. Source: ZipRecruiter CCA-N: $109,430 Name of certification: Oracle Database PL/SQL Developer Certified Professional Description: This credential shows that the IT pro is proficient with Oracle's database. How much it may cost to get it: $490 for the two exams required. Prep courses can run over $7,700. Potential salary: $109,430 Difficulty level in obtaining: This is a more advanced certification that requires first passing a pre-requisite cert. Source: Global Knowledge Training Salesforce Marketing Cloud Consultant: $111,590 Name of certification: Salesforce Marketing Cloud Consultant Description: A middle-tier certification that demonstrates proficiency using Salesforce's Marketing Cloud. How much it may cost to get it: $200. Salesforce offers free online prep courses through its Trailhead education site.  Potential salary: $111,590 Difficulty level in obtaining: This is not a terribly hard certification to obtain, but it does require a pre-requisite.   Source: ZipRecruiter CCP-V: $112,973 Name of certification: Citrix Certified Professional Virtualization (CCP-V) Description: This is an advanced certification on networking tech from Citrix, maker of tech that allows any enterprise to deliver applications over a network (rather than install apps on devices). How much it may cost to get it: The exam costs $300. Prep courses can run between $3,000 and $6,000.  Potential salary: $112,973 Difficulty level in obtaining: This certification requires completing the associate level cert  as a prerequisite and passing two exams. Source: Global Knowledge Training Oracle Database Developer: $120,927 Name of certification: Oracle Database PL/SQL Developer Certified Professional Description: This credential shows that the IT pro is proficient with Oracle's database. How much it may cost to get it: $490 for the two required exams. Prep courses can run over $7,700. Potential salary: $120,927 Difficulty level in obtaining: This is a more advanced certification that requires first passing a pre-requisite cert. Source: Salary.com Azure Administrator Associate: $125,993 Name of certification: Microsoft Certified Azure Administrator Associate Description: This credential validates that an IT pro has the skills to be an administrator of apps and services running on Microsoft's cloud Azure. How much it may cost to get it: $165 for the exam. There are free self-study resources available. Third-party prep courses can run between $2,595 and $3,000. Potential salary: $125,993 Difficulty level in obtaining: Although this is a fairly entry-level certification, most trainers recommend that the IT pro have completed the first level cert, Azure Fundamentals. Source: Global Knowledge Training ITIL Foundation: $129,402 Name of certification: ITIL Foundation Description: This credential from the Information Technology Infrastructure Library is one of the world's most common systems for IT infrastructure management. How much it may cost to get it:  The exam fee varies by location from $150 to $500. Third-party prep courses for the exam range from $750 to $2,495. Potential salary: $129,402 Difficulty level in obtaining: This is an entry-level certification and a pre-requisite for other ITIL certifications. Source: Global Knowledge Training VMware Certified Professional: $130,226 Name of certification: VMware Certified Professional 6 Data Center Virtualization Description: The credential validates that an IT pro can build and run infrastructure using VMware's popular vSphere 6 product. How much it may cost to get it: $250 to VMware for the exam. Third-party prep courses can run $4,300. Potential salary: $130,226 Difficulty level in obtaining:  This a mid-level VMware certification and requires several other certifications en route, that could take up to a year to complete. Source: Global Knowledge Training CISA: $132,278 Name of certification: ISACA's Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA) Description: As one of the oldest certifications around (from 1978), the CISA credential proves a computer security pro has skills in auditing. How much it may cost to get it:  $575-$760 for the exam (depending on membership with ISACA). Prep courses run $800 for ISACA members to $2,595 for third-party classes. Potential salary: $132,278 Difficulty level in obtaining: IT pros must have at least five years of information system audit, control, or security experience. Source: Global Knowledge Training PMP: $143,493 Name of certification: PMI's Project Management Professional (PMP) Description: While not a technical certification, Project Management Institute PMP is popular among tech professionals who work in product development, computer security, or PM jobs.  How much it may cost to get it: Between $405 and $555, depending on PMI membership. Prep courses run between $2,000 and $3,000. Potential salary: $143,493 Difficulty level in obtaining: The PMP requires a college degree and 3-years PM experience or a high school degree (or equivalent) and five-years PM experience, and involves 35 hours of project management education and training.  Source: Global Knowledge Training Salesforce Certified Technical Architect: $144,974 Name of certification: Salesforce Certified Technical Architect Description: This is Salesforce's top expert credential that certifies that an IT pro has mastered designing, building, and maintaining a Salesforce infrastructure. How much it may cost to get it:  The exam costs $6,000. Salesforce's free online training platform, Trailhead, can help guide through many pre-requisites. Courses with instructors can cost up to $2,700 apiece. Potential salary: $144,974 Difficulty level in obtaining: This certification will take years to get and require obtaining at least seven (but many people do nine) previous Salesforce certifications. Source: ZipRecruiter CRISC: $146,480 Name of certification: ISACA's Certified in Risk and Information Systems Control (CRISC) Description: CRISC is a certification aimed at mid-career level IT professionals that demonstrate that they have the skills for enterprise risk management and control. How much it may cost to get it: Between $575 and $760 (depending on membership with ISACA). Prep courses run $800 for ISACA members to $2,400 for third-party classes. Potential salary: $146,480 Difficulty level in obtaining: This credential requires a minimum of three years of related work experience or successfully completing at least two previous ISACA examinations of the four required for certification. Source: Global Knowledge Training CISM: $148,622 Name of certification: ISACA's Certified Information Security Manager (CISM) Description: The CISM is a popular credential among IT pros that specialize in computer security from the Information Systems Audit and Control Association. It helps security pros demonstrate that they understand the relationship between business needs and security. How much it may cost to get it: Between $575 and $760 (depending on membership with ISACA) for the exam. Study courses and prep materials can cost between $1,000 and $2,000. Potential salary: $148,622 Difficulty level in obtaining: This cert requires five years experience in a qualifying technical job. Some candidates may qualify with a year or two of experience if they hold several other pre-requisite certifications. Source: Global Knowledge Training CCIE: $149,846 Name of certification: Cisco Certified Internetwork Expert (CCIE) Description: Cisco's CCIE remains the gold standard in computer networking certifications. It is no longer a single certification but is comprised of six specialties, including classic enterprise infrastructure and Cisco's collaboration tech. How much it may cost to get it:  Written exams cost $450 and hands-on lab exams are $1,600 per attempt and only available at specific authorized sites. Prep courses can run $6,000, and there will also be costs involved to buy networking hardware. Potential salary: $149,846 Difficulty level in obtaining:  These expert-level certifications are some of the most difficult certs for an IT pro to earn. It may involve up to a year of study and requires obtaining multiple pre-requisite certifications.  Source: ZipRecruiter AWS Certified Solutions Architect Associate: $149,446 Name of certification: AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate Description: This credential proves that a developer can design and deploy applications using a wide-array of technologies Amazon Web Services — Amazon's cloud platform — across AWS's compute, networking, storage, and database services. How much it may cost to get it: $150 exam fee to Amazon. Preparation for this course may entail taking up to three third-party training courses costing around $3,000. Potential salary: Between $130,000 and $149,446 Difficulty level in obtaining: A prerequisite of the beginner-level AWS Cloud Practitioner Essentials is recommended, as well as a basic understanding of using AWS. This cert is popular with experienced IT professionals looking to add cloud credentials to their resume. Source: Global Knowledge Training Microsoft Azure Solutions Architect Expert: $152,094 Name of certification: Microsoft Azure Solutions Architect Expert Description: This credential shows that an IT pro has the skills to design and maintain infrastructure on Microsoft's cloud. How much it may cost to get it:  Each exam costs $160. Free self-study, online training materials are available. Prep courses from third-party trainers can run $4,000. Potential salary: $152,094 Difficulty level in obtaining:  This cert requires multiple Azure pre-requisites certificates (Administrator Associate and Developer Associate) and also involves two exams (Architect Technologies and Architect Design), according to trainer Global Knowledge. Source: ZipRecruiter Google Certified Professional Cloud Architect: $175,761 Name of certification: Google Certified Professional Cloud Architect Description: This credential, launched in 2017, proves that a developer can build, manage and scale apps and services using a wide-range of Google Cloud technologies.  How much it may cost to get it: $200 exam fee for Google. Preparation for this cert may entail taking up to five third-party training courses which could cost up to $5,000 and take a couple of months to complete.  Potential salary: $175,761 Difficulty level in obtaining:  This is one of the most popular advanced Google Cloud certifications and is recommended for IT pros with three or more years of experience.  Google cloud certifications are valid for two years. Source: Global Knowledge Training
Budget phones have never been this high-quality while being this affordable. After lots of testing and research, we found that the iPhone SE (2020) is the best budget phone you can buy with its incredible performance running on the same processor as the iPhone 11 series. The iPhone SE gives Apple fans the full-fat Apple experience with iOS and the supporting Apple ecosystem. For those who prefer Android, Google's new Pixel 4a is the best option with its reasonable price, excellent camera, and solid performance. Although most people in the US tend to buy their smartphones directly from cell service providers (carriers) like AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile, bargain hunters and tech geeks seek out budget unlocked phones online because they are affordable yet offer incredible value for the money. And, because most of these devices are unlocked, you can use them with the carrier of your choice, provided that they support the phone you buy. You can get unlocked phones at retailers like Best Buy and directly from phone manufacturers. We've rounded up the very best budget unlocked phones you can buy. Today's affordable phones are much more powerful than they used to be, and any of our top picks would make an excellent first smartphone for anyone who needs a reliable but inexpensive phone. In fact, we think phones like the new iPhone SE and the Google Pixel 4a would be great for most people in general. Here's what you need to know about buying unlocked phones Buying a phone unlocked can be intimidating the first time — especially if you've always bought your phone from a carrier like AT&T, Verizon, T-Mobile, or Sprint.  When you buy an unlocked phone, you'll pay the full price. If you buy from your carrier, the company often offers to let you buy the device on a payment plan so you can pay a little bit each month. Some unlocked phones may not work on Verizon or Sprint. Sprint and Verizon use a network called CDMA, but most unlocked phones use the more standard GSM network that both T-Mobile and AT&T use.  Here are the best budget smartphones in 2020: Best budget phone overall: iPhone SE (2020) Best budget phone for photography: Google Pixel 4a Best budget phone for battery life: Motorola Moto G Power Best budget phone for design: Samsung Galaxy A51 Best budget-priced flagship phone: OnePlus 7T Updated on 8/7/2020 by Antonio Villas-Boas: Added Google's Pixel 4a to the "Best budget phone for photography" category.SEE ALSO: The best microSD cards you can buy The best budget phone overall The new $400 iPhone SE is basically a much cheaper (and smaller) iPhone 11, minus the ultra-wide camera, disguised as an iPhone 8. For $399.00, the new iPhone SE is among the more expensive budget smartphones, but it still offers incredible value. You get the performance from Apple's flagship iPhone 11 series processor and a sharp, 12-megapixel camera with Apple's Smart HDR, portrait mode, and depth control (i.e. adjusting background blur after taking a photo). With that said, if photography is important to you, Google's Pixel 4a may still reign supreme in the budget category.  Taking on a nearly identical look and feel as the classic iPhone 8, the iPhone SE has a 4.7-inch LCD Retina HD screen, an aluminum and glass build, an IP67 water resistance, a Touch ID home button, and the excellent iOS mobile operating system. With the new iPhone SE, you're basically getting the $700 iPhone 11 with a smaller screen, without the ultra-wide camera lens, and disguised as an iPhone 8 for nearly half the price. That does mean you get the big screen bezels instead of the iPhone 11's sleek all-screen design, but a trade-off on design is common on budget smartphones.  Apple isn't known for its budget smartphones, so I can't believe I'm saying this: It's going to be tough to out-do Apple's iPhone SE in the budget smartphone game. Pros: Powerful A13 Bionic processor, compact size, only iPhone with a home button and fingerprint sensor, effective camera for the price Cons: Design feels a bit old, lacking some camera features compared to similarly priced Android phones. Small for budget buyers looking for a bigger screen. Read our iPhone SE review here The best budget phone for photography Google's Pixel 4a has a flagship-quality camera, great battery life, good performance, and an edge-to-edge screen.  The Google Pixel 4a is a gem of a smartphone that delivers an excellent core smartphone experience. It doesn't have some of the iPhone SE's flourishes like water resistance, wireless charging, or a glass and metal build, but it's less expensive, and it's the absolute best option for Android users.  It's remarkable value for its $350 retail price tag and makes you wonder if premium flagships are really worth the extra money.  The Pixel 4a has a 5.81-inch edge-to-edge OLED screen with minimal bezels and a refresh rate of 60Hz, which is slower than most flagship phones, but solid for a phone in this price range. The Qualcomm Snapdragon 730G processor offers smooth performance in my experience. Best of all, it has a flagship-quality 12.2-megapixel dual-pixel camera that takes great photos and an 8-megapixel front-facing cam that takes great selfies. The Pixel 4a charges up quickly as well via the included 18W charger and USB-C cable. Pros: Sub-$400 price tag, flagship-quality camera, great battery life, good performance, modern edge-to-edge OLED screen Cons: No water resistance, no wireless charging — minor nitpicks when you're paying under $400 Read our Google Pixel 4a review here The best budget phone for battery life Motorola's Moto G Power offers quite a lot and a decent core smartphone experience for 25% of the price of $1,000 premium phones, and it has among the best battery life on any smartphone. Motorola's Moto G series has produced excellent budget phones year after year since it first launched. The Moto G Power is an impressive budget phone that ticks all the boxes and has an attractive price for high-end features. It can also work on any major carrier network. The Moto G Power isn't a showstopper in the looks department, but it is actually made out of glass and metal It looks and feels good in your hands, though some may find it a bit slippery and glass is fragile. We recommend you buy a case for it. The real deal-maker here is its 5,000mAh battery, which should last you a couple days minimum with normal usage, and it charges up quickly with Motorola's TurboPower charging, which promises to give you six hours of use after 15 minutes of charging. Its 6.4-inch screen is sharp and clear with a 2,300 x 1,080-pixel resolution, the Qualcomm Snapdragon 665 processor is fast when paired with 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage is decent as is the option to expand it via a Micro SD card up to 512GB. The phone also has a fingerprint sensor and face unlock for security. The G Power has a pretty good 16-megapixel regular camera, but the 8-megapixel ultra-wide and somewhat baffling 2-megapixel macro camera shouldn't be reasons to buy this phone. Selfie-takers will be pleased with the 16-megapixel front-facing camera. Pros: Amazing low price, decent camera, fingerprint sensor for security, incredible battery life, and quick Android updates Cons: Glass is fragile and slippery, ultra-wide and macro cameras are poor quality, doesn't perform very well on power-hungry games Read our Motorola Moto G Power review here The best budget phone for design Samsung's Galaxy A51 is a great smartphone in almost every respect, with the best screen on any mid-range phone, a premium design, an effective camera system, and impressive battery life.  The Galaxy A51 from Samsung is a mid-ranger that thinks it's a premium flagship. It has a beautiful slim and premium design that dismisses the divisive notch and employs Samsung's signature hole-punch-style selfie camera. It also has a triple-lens camera system, which isn't outrageously special on a mid-ranger in 2020, and it goes to show just how good smartphones can be under the $500 mark. It has a 48-megapixel standard camera, 12-megapixel ultrawide, and a 5-megapixel macro camera, and it takes pretty good photos with all of the lenses. Performance is tricky — it runs everything you'd want it to, but it doesn't look pretty doing it, which is a massive shame. Swiping around apps and general usage can render some stuttered and jittery results that don't match the quality of the phone or the excellent 6.5-inch AMOLED screen. Still, it'll run power-hungry games just fine, surprisingly.  Good thing, then, that the Galaxy A51 has all the above to make up for those stutters, as well as an impressive battery life that can last you a couple days on a single charge with normal usage from a 4,000mAh battery.  Pros: A 6.5-inch AMOLED screen that make everything look beautiful, a good camera system, a gorgeous premium design, impressive battery life.  Cons: Stuttered experience during normal usage Read our Samsung Galaxy A51 review here The best budget-priced flagship phone Think you can't get a high-powered smartphone for a reasonable price? The OnePlus 7T will change your mind. The OnePlus 7T was the top flagship of 2019, and it's the best Android phone you can buy if you're not looking to spend close to four figures. It's certainly on the expensive side for the mid-range and budget range, and it's only available on T-Mobile these days, which is why it's not our top choice.  The OnePlus 7T boasts a beautiful 6.55-inch, AMOLED screen with almost no bezels. It just has a small circle on the front for the 16.megapixel selfie camera. It looks a lot like the new Galaxy S20 from the front. It's powered by the Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 chip and 8GB of RAM, so it performs like flagship phones that cost hundreds more. The phone's battery is long-lasting, and OnePlus' Dash charge tech will give you a full charge in just 30 minutes. But alas, there's no wireless charging.  The camera on the back has three sensors — one 48-megapixel, one 16-megapixel, and one 12-megapixel lens — which take excellent pictures and produce the blurred background bokeh effect in photos. The camera is on par with other great flagships in most settings, though its low-light performance isn't as strong as the Pixel phones. The back of the phone is made from glass and a slick metal band runs around the phone's edges. It feels great in the hand, though it is fragile, so we recommend popping a case on it. Pros: A 6.55-inch AMOLED screen, Face Unlock, dual-cameras, affordable, quick charge Cons: More expensive than other budget phones, no wireless charging Read our OnePlus 7T review here We look forward to testing the 2020 budget phones as they launch We're halfway through 2020, and there are a lot of new phones in our future. Most of the phones we look forward to testing are still just rumors and not yet confirmed.
The campus Wi-Fi network can be a powerful contact tracing tool in the hands of universities aiming to protect students against the coronavirus
Invite is open to all walks of gamer life, even "if you were ever a dick to us."
On this DT Live we break down the top tech stories, including the safe return of SpaceX’s astronaut crew.
And why some players think disarmament will unlock long-hidden new content.
This week will see the next step in the currently floundering mission to bring Silicon Valley to heel as US lawmakers examine the strategies which made the technology industry the force it is today.
Drivers for ride hailing giant Uber are suing the firm in Europe to access their data, arguing that the app uses different markers to determine who gets the best jobs. In a second, related UK lawsuit, they are also suing to change their employment status in a way that would give them certain rights such as paid holiday and national minimum wage. They say the landmark lawsuits could help to address the power imbalance between tech giants and workers in the estimated $200 billion gig economy.  According to one former driver involved in the suits, James Farrar, obtaining information could be a key mechanism to enable gig economy workers to organize. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Uber is facing an uprising from drivers in Europe who want both increased stability and greater freedom, demanding stronger employment rights and access to their data respectively. On the employment rights front, two Uber drivers continue to fight for basic guarantees in the UK's Supreme Court. Uber drivers are currently classified as independent contractors, who are not entitled to sick pay or the minimum wage. But in 2016, British drivers James Farrar and Yaseen Aslam successfully argued that Uber should give grant drivers "worker status", granting them rights like paid holiday and the national minimum wage. Uber has continually appealed that decision and has now taken its fight to the Supreme Court, where a ruling is expected in October. It could be a landmark decision for gig economy workers and a potentially costly outcome for Uber. Uber's argument is that its platform only connects passengers with drivers, who are given the flexibility to log into the app when they please and turn down rides they don't want to take. James Farrar is a former Uber driver who is involved with both legal cases. He's now the founder of Worker Info Exchange, an organization that aims to help gig economy workers in Europe obtain their data. Worker Info Exchange is one of the founding members of the International Alliance of App-Based Transport Workers (IAATW), a union fighting for the rights of gig economy workers. It was formed in January this year and already has delegates across 23 countries and multiple platforms, including Lyft, Ola, and Bolt, as well as Uber.   Speaking to Business Insider, he painted a darker picture of long hours and poor pay, of how he was forced to take all the rides he was offered in order to chase a 4.4 star average or else risk his account being deactivated.  "Uber gives me work but also I'm obliged to do that work for Uber," says Farrar. "Uber will say you can cancel the job if you like, but you can't do that without incurring some kind of a penalty. If I was truly self-employed I could cancel all the work I wanted to, it wouldn't make any difference, it's my choice." "It strikes me as Uber trying to justify a fairly complicated shell game, which ultimately cheats workers," he adds. "If you're at the lowest rung and you're vulnerable to terrible exploitation like you can be in the gig economy, then you need the protection of a minimum wage." Uber says that it has changed its model since the 2016 tribunal, for example with the introduction of free insurance for its drivers.  Hidden tags lets the algorithm pick favorites Farrar is also part of the second high-profile lawsuit filed on July 20 against Uber in Amsterdam, where the company is headquartered for all of its non-US operations. This lawsuit is trying to force Uber to release the personal data of drivers, which it claims is hidden in profiles tagged with information about late arrivals, cancellations, and complaints about attitude and inappropriate behaviour from customers. Uber drivers believe that the algorithm uses the tags to manage their performance. "The app decides millions of times a day who's going to get which ride and who gets the nice rides, who gets the short rides," said Anton Ekker, the lawyer representing the Uber drivers in the lawsuit. "It's all about the distribution of power. So Uber is exerting control through data and automated decision making and it's blocking the access to that," he says, adding that this is a problem throughout the gig economy. "If Uber is forced by the courts to provide more data, this will contribute to workers' rights, to balancing this power relation." Uber says it has responded to all requests for data. "Drivers, and anyone else using our app, can request access to the data that we can legally provide," says an Uber spokesperson. "We will give explanations when we cannot provide certain data, such as when it doesn't exist or disclosing it would infringe on the rights of another person under GDPR." The data privacy lawsuit is directly connected to the Supreme Court case: Farrar said he first became aware of what he characterized as hidden driver profiles from the internal communications Uber submitted for its defense case.  The release of such data could be a blow to Uber's argument that its drivers are independent contractors, as it could prove that the app does more than just connect self-employed drivers with paying customers.  Digital rights are workers' rights The lawsuits against Uber are part of a perceived power imbalance in the gig economy, where workers feel they answer to black-box algorithms rather than human managers. Uber says that using location information to match passengers with drivers leads to more business for drivers, but Farrar believes that the increasing reliance on algorithms can work against drivers' interest and result in unfair outcomes.   "Uber has a rule that if you reach 4.4 in your ratings, you're deactivated. So basically Uber has outsourced management to the discriminatory view of their customer," says Farrar. "The question then becomes who reaches 4.4 faster? If I'm a white European man from Ireland, am I going to reach 4.4 faster than a migrant worker from West Africa?" Uber doesn't publicly disclose what rating results in drivers being booted off its platform, but prior reporting from Business Insider put the number at 4.6. Understanding the data and how it is used by the algorithms is the first step in addressing the asymmetric power between gig economy workers and tech giants like Uber, according to Farrar. "The long hard road that we are on now is how do we organize the dispersed digital workforce? And what is the currency for our organizing? The gateway in the future to worker rights is through digital rights," he said. A win against Uber could open the floodgates for data privacy challenges against other apps.  The need to assert the rights of gig economy workers is now more important than ever, Farrar continued, with delivery apps expected to be some of the biggest winners in the post-pandemic economy.  Global customer volume in the digital gig economy is projected to grow to $455 billion in 2023, from $204 billion in  2018, according to Mastercard.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: A cleaning expert reveals her 3-step method for cleaning your entire home quickly
Photo by Chris Welch / The Verge Staples is running an incredible sale on Apple’s AirPods Pro earbuds, bringing the retail price down to $200, or $50 off its usual $250 price tag. This the best deal we have seen yet for Apple’s flagship true wireless earbuds. Unlike its sibling, the AirPods, which has a hard plastic “one size fits most” design, the AirPods Pro design is an in-ear construction and with silicone tips, which included three different sizes to provide a customizable fit for your ears. The AirPods Pro also include active noise cancellation, better sound quality, and a wireless charging case. If you are an Apple user, my colleague Chris Welch thinks the AirPods Pro are the best wireless earbuds worth your money. The deal is available until August 1st, but we... Continue reading…
Twitter shares spiked about 6% in pre-market trading on Thursday after the social network reported record growth in daily active users in the second quarter. The company added 20 million users in the period, fueling a 34% year-on-year increase in its userbase to 186 million. However, its earnings fell short of Wall Street forecasts as revenue fell 19%, and it posted a net loss of $1.2 billion. CEO Jack Dorsey also described last week's hack — which saw celebrities like Elon Musk and Bill Gates have their accounts compromised — as "a very public and disappointing security issue." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Twitter stock jumped about 6% in pre-market trading after the social-media group revealed a record increase in users in the second quarter. However, its revenue and profits fell short of the consensus forecasts of analysts polled by Bloomberg. Here are the key numbers: Revenue: $683 million versus $705 million estimated. Operating income: $124 million loss versus $49.2 million loss estimated. EPS: -$1.56 versus -$0.16 estimated. Twitter's revenues fell 19% as advertising sales tumbled 23% due to the coronavirus pandemic. Combined with higher costs, that meant the company posted a net loss of $1.2 billion — a sharp swing from the $1.1 billion in net income it made in the second quarter of 2019. Read More: Warren Buffett isn't warning about sky-high stocks because he 'doesn't want to make people mad,' veteran investor Bill Smead says More positively, Twitter grew its average daily active user base by 34% year-on-year to 186 million, as it added 20 million users in the three months to June 30. The robust growth followed a 24% increase in its users to 166 million in the first quarter. Twitter's bosses attributed the latest increase to people signing up to join a global conversation about current events, as well as product improvements. "The elevated usage of our service presents a tremendous opportunity to serve the public conversation and to be where even more people go to see what's happening," CEO Jack Dorsey said in his quarterly shareholder letter. Read More: A Wall Street expert details the hurdles that must be cleared before a bitcoin ETF is approved — and explains why other investing substitutes for the crypto fall short Dorsey also addressed the hacking of several high-profile Twitter accounts including Joe Biden, Elon Musk, and Warren Buffett last week. "Twitter suffered a very public and disappointing security issue," he said in the letter. The company "moved quickly to address what happened" and has improved its resiliency to social-engineering attempts, rolled out additional safeguards to its systems, and continues to cooperate with law enforcement as they investigate the matter, he added.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
At the Huawei P40 conference in April this year, Huawei launched a super-fast vertical wireless charger. The Huawei SuperCharge stand supports a maximum of 40W ... The post Huawei 40W wired vs 40W wireless charging – Is there any difference? appeared first on Gizchina.com.
Microsoft may release Windows 10 updates in the fall and Windows 10X updates in the spring going forward.
Samsung is not one to take “no” for an answer and, despite rumors that its next foldable phone is far from ready, it seems that it will still be pushing through with at least a grand reveal next month. It still hasn’t confirmed the odd new name but the Galaxy Z Flip 2 might be bringing some much-needed improvements in … Continue reading
In many ways, at its simplest, Spider-Man 2 is its predecessor rendered again, albeit at a grander scale.
T-Mobile revealed Scam Shield today for the protection of all T-Mobile, Sprint, and Metro by T-Mobile users. Scam Shield is a program under which T-Mobile will launch several features. Scam Shield includes free scam identification and blocking, enhanced Called ID, and ID monitoring. T-Mobile also suggested that users can now get a “free second number to keep your personal number … Continue reading
In these troubled times one industry is experiencing a real windfall (sorry).
Ten former staff and board members of the world’s largest museum complex have urged executives to address an alleged long-standing “culture of racism” at its museum of African art in Washington, DC.A group of former staff members at the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art (NMAfA) have accused their leadership of turning a blind eye to concerns of bigotry in a two-page letter seen by HuffPost. The letter’s signatories are calling for the resignation of the NMAfA’s deputy director and chief curator Christine Mullen Kreamer to “enable real, systemic changes in the museum’s practices and policy implementation”.The letter was addressed to Smithsonian secretary Lonnie G Bunch III, who last year became the first Black person to serve as the institution’s head and now oversees 19 Smithsonian museums.The letter alleges that more than 10 former or current Black employees have “reported or experienced incidents of racial bias, hostile verbal attacks, retaliation, terminations, microaggressions and degrading comments,” all of which have been ignored by management when raised formally.On several occasions, managers at the museum have attempted to promote white employees into vacant roles while disregarding the institutional policy requiring a competitive application process, former staffers said.“Persistent racial disparities at NMAfA are apparent in the application of institutional policies,” the letter reads.“Recent events have brought deeper attention to systemic racism within museums across our country. In this spirit, we write to you to express our outrage about the current state of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art.“Our goal is to collectively express our concerns and to engage in building an equitable and inclusive museum for our community.”  One former staffer claims just five full-time Black employees worked at the museum at the time they left – out of more than 40 staff members – which is solely dedicated to the arts and culture of Africa.They also say there were no Black curators at the museum and, for more than 10 years, its entire curatorial team had been exclusively white despite what the letter’s authors describe as a “demonstrated interest amongst Black arts professionals and scholars in joining the institution”.The Smithsonian Institute did not comment on claims about the diversity of the museum’s staff.Kreamer, deputy director and chief curator at NMAfA, has allegedly had “multiple complaints” filed against her by employees concerning racism, aggression and mismanagement, according to the former staff members.These complaints include alleged abuse of her hiring and promotion authority in favour of white employees and “consistent bullying and hostility” directed toward Black colleagues who raised concerns about her behaviour, the letter claims.Kreamer, who joined the curatorial staff at the National Museum of African Art in 2000 before being promoted to her current role in 2009, did not respond to HuffPost’s request for comment.The letter’s signatories are calling for a replacement to be selected from a diverse pool of candidates – and the position of deputy director and chief curator “to be separated to ensure effective management of the museum”.From 2019 to 2020, two senior Black employees in key roles were suddenly dismissed without any evidence of underperformance or unethical behaviour, former employees have said. By contrast, the letter claims, white colleagues who exhibited “sub-par performance” were offered special counselling, expanded job responsibilities or redeployment to new positions.Black staffers claimed NMAfA managers created obstacles to their ability to do their jobs, but gave white employees chances to develop such as speaking engagements and conference work, the letter says.The former employees claim the “toxic” culture of racism at NMAfA did not improve under former director Gus Casely-Hayford’s tenure between 2018 and his departure in 2020.“This situation became particularly distressing under Gus Casely-Hayford, resulting in negative impacts on Black staff, as well as NMAfA’s reputation within the broader community,” they wrote about the Black British curator in the letter.Casely-Hayford did not respond to a request for comment. One letter signatory, who asked not to be named, told HuffPost: “Unfortunately these incidents and concerns about systemic racism only grew during Gus’ tenure. He did nothing to address them. [...]“It’s so important that there’s self examination within the Black community and there’s a discussion about internal racism.”The letter’s signatories say the police killing of George Floyd and the Black Lives Matter movement that followed have presented the opportunity to raise their concerns with fresh optimism about being heard.“I think about George Floyd’s life and this would not be happening right now if it wasn’t for what happened,” one told HuffPost.“Six months ago, if we had tried to speak out in this way, talking to journalists or galvanising in this way, I think there would be a reluctance to address this issue, and it’s even harder to do this when there’s a Black person in leadership.” Six months ago, if we had tried to speak out in this way, [...] there would be a reluctance to address this issue, and it’s even harder to do this when there’s a Black person in leadership.Another signatory, who also didn’t want to be named for fear of repercussions, echoed these sentiments.“It is a pivotal moment for people of colour to be able to speak their truth and, where people of colour have had bias affect them, be able to talk about it with the mindset that there is a platform now that supports the ability to do that,” the signatory said.“The Black Lives Matter movement focuses specifically on police brutality and the vulnerability of people of colour — but if you look at many different industries, organisations are now self-reflecting and, at the same time, people of colour are looking at this as a time to speak up,” they said.It is not the first time a letter has been sent to the Smithsonian outlining these concerns, according to the former employees.In early 2020, nine members of the NMAfA’s 13-person advisory board wrote of their concerns about the treatment of Black staff members following the dismissal of a Black employee on the museum’s senior leadership team by Casely-Hayford. The worker had just one week left of her one-year probationary period, and there were no grounded complaints about her performance or behaviour, it is alleged.Casely-Hayford, a successful Black man who was in a powerful position at the Smithsonian, stands accused of not doing enough to help Black people subjected to racism within an organisation that champions Black art.“As a person of colour in a titular position, I think there’s a responsibility to make sure that diversity and inclusion – particularly inclusion – are at the front and centre of the organisation,” the first signatory said. “It’s not just about hiring people of colour to make up the numbers. It’s about making sure there is fair and equitable opportunity in that particular organisation for people to be seen, heard and able to progress.”They added: “There’s often a tendency to open the door for yourself and do well in your career — but the mark of your legacy is that you open the door behind you and bring more people forward.”Seven recommendations for improvements have been suggested to the Smithsonian’s leadership in the letter, including a pay equity plan for Black employees; a review of all firings, alleged racially driven incidents and complaints during the past five years; and a public commitment from the museum to improve representation and career advancement of Black employees.Related... Students' Union's First Black President Reveals 'Devastating' Experiences Of Everyday Racism Anti-Racism Campaigners Told School Curriculum Is 'Already Incredibly Diverse' The Fall Of America's Monuments To Racism
(ETH Zurich Department of Physics) In combined theoretical and experimental work, physicists at ETH Zurich introduce and demonstrate a novel mechanism for electron optics in two-dimensional solid-state systems. The discovery opens up a route to engineering quantum-optical phenomena in a variety of materials and devices.
CCO Serge Hascoet is out. So are the global head of HR, head of Canadian studios.
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