Alvaro Okajima

Alvaro Okajima

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A poll of experts suggests the Huawei ban will not put the UK “into the digital slow lane,” as the company has warned. The polling was conducted by The Chartered Institute for IT and gathered the opinions of 3,000 professionals. More than half of the experts surveyed said they do not believe Huawei’s claims that... Read more » The post Experts say the Huawei ban will not put the UK ‘into the digital slow lane’ appeared first on Telecoms Tech News.
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The Joy Ride update will hit Wednesday.
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However, 2020 models will receive it via firmware update
China
After a lot of rumours about an upgrade to the K30 Pro, a new Redmi device similar to the earlier one has hit the certification ... The post Redmi K30 Ultra shows up on TENAA appeared first on Gizchina.com.
UK
OnePlus and other smartphone companies made more powerful smartphones than the OnePlus Nord in the year 2020. But because of the OnePlus Nord’s unique combination of features, price, and design finesse, this is a smartphone that’s not to be missed. The potential for OnePlus in the near future is far more important than the release of this one phone – … Continue reading
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Microsoft Teams has unfair advantage, Slack claims.
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The Department of Homeland Security says US authorities have banned drones from flying near federal buildings in Portland because they believe drones are surveilling federal officers at protests there, Reuters reports. The order comes a few weeks after federal agencies were discovered using surveillance drones themselves, over peaceful protests in Minneapolis and other US cities. The agency said unidentified drones have flown over crowds of people protesting near federal buildings in Portland on several occasions. For the past eight weeks, protesters have marched in downtown Portland to push for police reforms, and in recent days have been joined by federal troops guarding the federal buildings. The troops have used tear gas and pepper... Continue reading…
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Looking for the best PlayStation VR bundles including the headset, Move motion controllers and PS4 camera? You've come to the right place.
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Here's a look at our most important stories for the week ending July 18.
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Goodness gracious, great balls of plant.
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Everyone is fair game when it comes to identity theft.
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Google Cloud on July 14 introduced two new security services to its cloud platform, including a VM service launched as part of Google’s Confidential Computing portfolio. The services cater to heavily regulated and security-sensitive industries including public sector, healthcare, and financial services. [ Also on InfoWorld: 13 ways Google Cloud beats AWS ] Confidential VMs, a data protection technology now in beta, is the first product in the company’s Confidential Computing data encryption initiative. Attempting to take isolation and sandboxing to the “next level,” Confidential VMs provide memory encryption on AMD EPYC CPUs, leveraging the hardware’s Secure Encrypted Virtualization feature. All Google Cloud Platform workloads running in VMs today can run on Confidential VMs.To read this article in full, please click here
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Director/production designer Hisko Hulsing pulls back the mystery on rotoscoping magic.
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CDC director is worried but says it's not too late to turn things around.
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We’re here to guide you through the coronavirus pandemic. Sign up to the Life newsletter for daily tips, advice, how-tos and escapism.“You’re only staying inside because of me. If I threw myself headfirst out of a window, this would all be over wouldn’t it?” As a mother, Jenny Hobbs felt her heart plummet when she heard her older son Stanley’s words. She desperately tried to reassure him and calm him down – knowing how hard he has found the coronavirus pandemic and all the ways it has changed his life.The 36-year-old mum from Bristol has two sons – Stanley, 15, who has a heart condition and asthma and Nathan, 12, who has ADHD and autism. Both have been struggling to cope mentally and emotionally over the past few months. Nathan has been too frightened to go outside, even to the garden, while Stanley has had the opposite worry that his family have been isolating only for him. Hobbs tells HuffPost UK she has tried to remain strong and upbeat in front of her boys – but secretly cries in the shower as “no one can hear you in there.”However, while she has felt desperately alone, Hobbs sadly isn’t. New research from Action for Children reveals one in three parents feel out of their depth as their children struggle to cope with the fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. The charity carried out a YouGov survey of more than 2,000 parents, laying bare the devastating impact the crisis has had on millions of families across the UK. Children have felt isolated and lonely, many struggling to sleep or suffering night terrors when they do, and some children are displaying unusually aggressive behaviour during lockdown, parents revealed. Families also shared their experiences of children bedwetting, becoming debilitatingly clingy, and not wanting to go outside. These behaviours have left parents reeling in turn – with four in 10 feeling more anxious than usual.Related... Kids May Be At Risk Of Post-Traumatic Stress. Here's How To Spot It These findings ring for Jenny Hobbs. Stanley, 15, was among the first children to be sent home from his school, before lockdown was introduced, as he has a condition which leads to an abnormal increase in his heart rate and requires a heart monitor in his chest. He also has asthma and his teacher told Hobbs that she did not feel it was safe for him to be at school with his respiratory issues. Shortly afterwards, Nathan’s school said the same of his situation – Hobbs’ younger son has Neuro Developmental Delay, Hobbs explains, so even though he is 12, he has significant emotional and behavioural immaturity. “Nathan heard one of his teachers say that each and every one of us would be affected by this pandemic and lose someone we love or know someone who is going to be affected,” says his mum. “He cried all the way home and when he got home, he grabbed hold of Stanley and said: ‘I don’t want you to die.’Hobbs says watching her boys struggle with their mental health has been the most painful thing she has ever witnessed and suspects thousands of parents will be feeling the same way as her, as they recognise the long-lasting impact of the pandemic on the “Covid children” whose lives have been upturned.“In the beginning of lockdown, Nathan was having terrible night terrors and in his head, he convinced himself we were all going to die,” says Hobbs. “Every time anyone coughed or spluttered or if there was the slightest thing, he would say: ‘You’ve got it.’“It is heartbreaking to see in their eyes they are so scared by all this. But you hold your own emotions in as you don’t want to break down in front of them.” The situation was complicated by the practical challenges of lockdown. Even though Hobbs had foodbank vouchers, she couldn’t leave the house – or her boys – to pick up supplies. “I was muddling through like a robot, too frightened to leave the house in case I brought something back and made the kids ill,” she says. “I’d never forgive myself if something happened to them.”Hobbs has received help from Action for Children’s emergency coronavirus appeal fund – and the charity also supplied a trampoline for Nathan, who gradually began going outside into the garden, if only for short bursts.As a Year 10 pupil, Stanley was in the first year of his GCSEs when the crisis began, while his younger brother is in Year 6, preparing to begin secondary school in September (at a year’s delay). With both sons at major milestones in their education, Hobbs has been concerned about the impact that missing months of school will have on them.“Their normal lives have been disrupted and all their routines have changed,” she says. “It is hard to watch them struggle and I worry about how all this is going to affect their emotional and physical health and their mental wellbeing. “There is also the concern about how these poor children and thousands like them might have to live with this for the rest of their lives and might not be able to sit their GCSEs and struggle to get employment after leaving school.”Stanley was already facing the pressures of catching up on his studies when he started showing the strain of staying inside and shielding against the virus.“It was very frightening when Stanley had his meltdown and threatened to throw himself out of the window,” Hobbs says. “Normally, 15-year-olds have lots of things to look forward to but he felt uncertain about not knowing what was going to happen. Stan is a very intelligent lad and I want the best for him. Before all this happened, we were talking about colleges. But now he can’t get the headspace to think beyond what is going to happen tomorrow.”Since lockdown has eased, he has returned to school for just two hours, one day a week, but Nathan has been back in school four days a week. However, it hasn’t been easy for either of the boys – or their mother.“He keeps asking me: ‘Has Covid gone away yet?’ I have to tell him the truth and say it hasn’t.“Nathan’s first day back at school was horrific,” says Hobbs. “He is coping better with it now but he is massively obsessed with washing his hands and is getting through four large family sized bottles of hand soap a week.”His anxiety shows whenever they leave the house. “Even now, when we are out walking, if Nathan feels I am getting too close to anyone, he pulls me back. He has convinced himself he is going to die of it. He also has the uncertainty of starting a new school soon amid all this.”Even as restrictions ease, parents remain fearful of weeks and months of uncertainty ahead. More than one in three (37%) surveyed by Action for Children say they are worried their children will struggle to socialise and will want to remain at home. And the charity is warning that things are likely to get worse as the long-term impacts of the pandemic become clearer.Related... ‘I Feel Like I’m A Crap Mum And Failing My Job’. Parents Reveal The Harsh Reality Of Working From Home It has experienced a surge in demand of 415% for parenting advice in the first three months of lockdown compared with the same time last year. As a result, it has launched Parent Talk, a new national online service which connects mums, dads and carers with trained parenting coaches. The confidential one-to-one online service offers parents free, practical advice and emotional support.Lynn Giles, Parent Talk manager at Action for Children, says: “The pandemic has triggered a crisis for mums, dads and children on an unprecedented scale with parents feeling overwhelmed without their usual support from friends and family or any certainty for the future.”With parents desperate for guidance, services like Parent Talk are needed more than ever, she says. “Our parent coaches are there for any questions parents have – big or small. Anyone who needs a bit of support in these tough times can access it.”The charity is also urging the government to prioritise children’s mental health in its Covid-19 recovery planning and provide adequate funding to meet the surge in need feared in the months ahead. “Huge numbers of children will need extra support over the coming months and parents are telling us they don’t know where to turn,” Giles says. “As the immediate health crisis passes, we now need to turn our attention to the scars coronavirus has left on families struggling with a whole new reality – with many grieving from having lost loved ones and others worrying about their jobs and futures.”For her part, Hobbs tells HuffPost UK she puts on a brave face for her sons but that seeing them struggle with their mental health makes her feel like a failure. “As a parent, you feel hopeless as what can you do apart from support them.” she says. “I feel I have to hide how I’m feeling as my boys have already gone through so much change in their lives and don’t need to see their mum who is supposed to be strong breaking down in front of them,” she says. “They look at you for answers so you have to try and be a pillar for them and be supportive and understanding and reassure them. But if your children see you are not coping, how can you expect them to cope?”Related... Our Kids Are Desperately Lonely In Lockdown. Here Are 10 Ways to Help Hopelessness Is A Heavy Feeling. Here Are 5 Ways To Help It Pass. Why Doesn't My Child Want To Go Outside?
UK
When I was offered the opportunity to go out and work as an ambulance clinical assistant during the coronavirus pandemic, I didn’t need to think twice. As a second-year paramedic science student it hit home that, with the number of ambulance crews growing in the face of coronavirus, this was a valuable chance to see how big an impact Covid-19 is having on the NHS and society as a whole. My excitement about the learning opportunity quickly turned to thoughts of how vulnerable we might be: visiting patients who may or may not be Covid-positive, and the possibility of taking the virus home to family members was an odd but not unrealistic proposition. Was I putting the ones I love at risk by doing a job that I love? Even though it was scary, I decided it was a great opportunity for me to learn. The first thing I learned was that it’s business as usual for ambulance crews, responding to calls as usual, albeit with the provision of personal protection equipment. West Midlands Ambulance Service, who I work with, had invested so much in PPE and gone all out to support and protect staff. Before the virus, we’d wear gloves, but now we have aprons, boot covers, masks, gloves and goggles. For paramedics, those first few minutes can make the difference, so while it’s time consuming, we got a lot faster with more experience of putting the PPE on. Here’s what my first shift looked like:  First call, 1920hrs: Patient with blunt head injury, we attended and, following assessment, suggested that he went to hospital – however the man refused, so he was left in his own environment after spending 1.5 hours with him. It was nerve-wracking taking my first call, when you’re on scene for so long your patient comes first so you forget your nerves. After that initial first job, I felt ready for my second and was feeling more confident.  Second call, 2115 hrs: Patient unconscious with noisy breathing, within ten minutes of arrival the patient had arrested and was transferred to hospital. Call took approximately 2.5 hours.Third call: Patient reported chest pain and following an electrocardiogram (ECG) was transferred to hospital. Approximately one hour spent with this patient.Fourth call: Patient had a fall and laceration. We helped them get up and advised a transfer to hospital. However, the patient refused on the basis of the Covid-19 situation. Despite a prolonged period of reassurance, the patient still refused to accompany the crew and we had no choice but to leave the patient at home. This, to me, was a sign that the pandemic and lockdown have created fear for some patients, and that some don’t want to risk attending an A&E department in cases they normally wouldn’t even think twice about.One thing I noticed on my shift is that lockdown has clearly created an increased feeling of loneliness for those who live alone or can’t be visited by family, and a lack of being in touch with the outside world. Knowing that helping those individuals and providing them with a much-needed friendly face and a real person for them to talk to felt rewarding. These tend to be members of older generations, who in my experience are usually the people most stoic in their approach to life. Seeing how they have clearly been affected psychologically by all of this has been heart-wrenching, and we often felt sad to walk away and leave them alone once again in the middle of the night.As for the people we do take to hospital, their fear of being unwell is often compounded by a fear of going into hospital, fearing they may contract the virus as a result. I can physically feel that fear and hear it in the voices around me. I’m the one sat in the back of the ambulance with the patient on route, trying to constantly reassure them, trying my hardest to make them feel comfortable. A few patients seem to pick up on the way, and then when you pull up to the hospital you can see those nerves return, no matter how much you have reassured them. That’s all just one snapshot of one shift. The next can be entirely different to this, every job being a Category 1 (the most serious) or every job being a Category 3, no one can predict what the next 24 hours will bring. At the end of all of this, I hope there is support for all of those within the NHS, to give them all some down time to reflect and talk about their experiences during this crisis, good and bad.  In one day I had four Category 1 calls (where patients can have life threatening conditions), including two involving very young children, one of whom we had to rush to A&E. It was a lot to process, and I went to A&E to check on their progress before I went home, which helped me. Being a paramedic is so daunting, but that’s part of what I love about doing what I do: most of all, it’s about being there for people when they are at what may be their lowest or most frightening point. If I can make that journey in their life a little easier, especially during this pandemic, then I go home satisfied, knowing I’ve made a difference.Sam is a paramedic student at Wolverhampton University. He appears in Channel 4′s Paramedics: Britain’s Lifesavers, airing Monday 13 July Have a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal I’m A BAME Nurse, But This Is Why I’m Dreading Going 'Back To Normal’ After Coronavirus How The ‘Hostile Environment’ Has Made This Pandemic Harder For Doctors Like Me I Was A Doctor In Syria’s Civil War. Now I’m On The NHS’ Coronavirus Frontline
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The formal revelation of the PlayStation 5 console has had fans and the Internet split over its design. The most neutral way to describe the box, if you can even call it a box, is that it’s different. Because of that, there have been some concerns that physical copies of games, which will still come in good old-fashioned circular disc … Continue reading
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This Force-powered adventure, which hits PS4, Xbox One and PC on Nov. 15, is the first single-player game set in a galaxy far, far away since 2010's The Force Unleashed 2.So there's a lot riding on this one, especially after the controversy surrounding the last major Star Wars game, 2017's Battlefront 2.Star Wars is a cinematic franchise at its heart, and Jedi: Fallen Order certainly delivers in the 20 or so hours it took me to complete it.When he uses the Force to save a friend, the Second Sister (a Jedi-hunting Imperial Inquisitor) is drawn to him.Rescued by former Jedi Cere Junda and pilot Greez Dritus, he follows the path of Cere's late master to find a holocron containing the names and locations of Force-sensitive children -- who are potentially the next generation of Jedi.The crew flies from planet to planet in Greez's ship -- the Stinger Mantis -- to explore ancient temples, battle the Empire and restore Cal's Force abilities, with an engaging narrative and plenty of jaw-droppingly cool moments.
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GM’s Cruise announced this past June that it would postpone plans for a driverless taxi service, which it previously said would debut in 2019.In fact, work on the underlying systems and infrastructure has accelerated in the intervening months, according to head of Cruise’s AI and machine learning division Hussein Mehanna.The passion and drive in the last six months I’ve witnessed demonstrates that people at Cruise … want to deliver the safest, most comfortable vehicle ever,” said Mehanna, a veteran of Microsoft, Google, and Facebook who previously served as Snap’s director of engineering.“The faster we update [these systems] in the driver’s seat, the faster we can get to the point where we release a car.”The company to this end detailed the work conducted by its Mapping team, which creates the high-definition maps that enable its cars to self-orient on the road.The maps in question comprise two asset types — 3D tiles rendered from short- and long-range lidar data and data-encoding labels — that provide information about features like lane boundaries, traffic lights (and their locations), and roadway curb edges.
UK
3D-printed beef steaks and chicken could be on the menu in European restaurants as soon as next year, and meat printers could be in your home – if you want one – possibly within the next few years.So reports The Guardian, highlighting Israeli and Spanish operations which are printing beef and chicken products with the same (fibrous) texture, appearance and flavor as real meat, but with no harm to animals involved (they are made from plant proteins only).One such firm is Israel-based Redefine Meat, which is using “advanced food formulations” along with “proprietary 3D printing technology” to make what it calls the “holy grail of alt-meat”.3D printers are capable of printing meat substitutes from either plant protein or laboratory-grown animal cells.The benefits are widespread and include a massively reduced overall impact on the environment compared to cattle farming, and on the health front, the 3D-printed meat product has no cholesterol either.According to Redefine Meat, meat alternatives is the fastest growing segment of the food market, and is expected to be a $140 billion industry by 2030.
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MIT’s Biomimetics Robotics department took a whole herd of its new ‘mini cheetah’ robots out for a group demonstration on campus recently – and the result is an adorable, impressive display of the current state of robotic technology in action.The school’s students are seen coordinating the actions of 9 of the dog-sized robots running through a range of activities, including coordinated movements, doing flips, springing in slow motion from under piles of fall leaves, and even playing soccer.The mini cheetah weights just 20 lbs, and its design was revealed for the first time earlier this year by a team of robot developers working at MIT’s Department of Mechanical Engineering.The mini cheetah is a shrunk-down version of the Cheetah 3, a much larger and more expensive to produce robot that is far less light on its feet, and not quite so customizable.The mini cheetah was designed for Lego-like assembly using off-the-shelf part, as well as durability and relative low cost.It can walk both right-side up, and upside down, and its most impressive ability just might be the way it can manage a full backflip from a stand-still.
UK
Despite the proliferation of instant messaging services, our mobile-centric culture is still dependent on good old text messages.But what if those text messages never reached their recipients or only months after they made any sense?That’s the rather strange situation that many in the US just experienced when Valentine’s messages they sent months ago only reached their intended targets in November in the middle of the night.The lucky ones woke up to a rather strange experience of receiving loving messages dated Wednesday that were, in fact, sent on February 14, 2019.Others who don’t mute their phones might have been woken up in the middle of the night to the perplexing message.It may sound hilarious but it was quite the opposite for some people.
UK
Indian retailer Flipkart announced that it'll be stocking Nokia smart TVs but it's unlikely we'll see them in the west.The TVs won't actually be made by Nokia or its parent company, HMD Global, but by Harmon, with audio courtesy of JBL.Flipkart will be paying to have the Nokia brand slapped on the telly.It looks like the TVs won't be launching outside of India, unlike the OnePlus TV, which launched in India last month but will be winging its way to the west eventually.“We are delighted that Flipkart, the leading e-commerce company in the country, will bring the first-ever Nokia branded Smart TVs to India," said Vipul Mehrotra, VP of Nokia Brand Partnerships."Today marks the start of an exciting new chapter for the Nokia brand in a new category.
US
For a long time, Microsoft had the reputation for being unfriendly to developers.After all, Microsoft infamously spent much of the '90s and '00s battling with the open source community — the free and remixable software that they were creating posed an existential threat to Windows and other Microsoft products.Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer even infamously called the open source operating system Linux "a cancer."But 2014 marked a turning point, when Satya Nadella took the reins as CEO, leading the company to turn this attitude around.About a year into his reign, Microsoft released one of the surest signs yet of its new attitude: Visual Studio Code, a free and open source code editor that has its roots in Visual Studio, Microsoft's flagship integrated development environment (IDE), which is essentially the software that developers use to make more software.Just Monday, Microsoft announced an online version of Visual Studio, which supports Visual Studio Code.
UK
Fossil has just updated its hybrid watch range with the announcement of the Fossil Hybrid HR – an analog watch which packs in a huge number of smart features.Like all hybrids this has mechanical hands, leaving it looking a lot like a conventional watch.But it also has a circular always-on display under those hands, which can show a variety of information, such as the weather, your step count, the date, and call and text previews.One big addition here though – given away by the name – is a heart rate monitor, making the Fossil Hybrid HR a much better exercise partner than previous hybrid watches from Fossil, such as the Fossil Q Commuter.These are the best smartwatchesFeature-packed and full of life
China
Xiaomi brand is definitely not a novice in producing high-quality audio products and their selection of headphones, earphones and earbuds is quite extensive.And growing larger almost every day, because they are pumping up new models to the market with almost machine gun speed.Today we have for you a fresh new Xiaomi QCY T5 wireless in-ear earphones and of course paired with a pretty nice price from the Ebay marketplace.Just one product would be too little for our readers so for good measure we are throwing in a deal for a Huawei CP60/CP61 wireless charging pads too.But first let’s take a look at the Xiaomi QCY T5 earphones as they are bringing significant improvements compared to the older T3 model.These binaural TWS earphones can offer new stylish ear canal shape design, 6.2mm Hi-Fi drivers for each of the earphones, automatic pairing system, Bluetooth 5.0 connectivity, IPX5 waterproof certification, full touch controls, 4.38g of weight for each of the earphones, 40 mAh battery capacity in each for about 4-5 hours of battery life or extended to 25 hours with the 380 mAh charging box.
US
While Apple’s fiscal 2019 will be remembered as a year of ups and downs, growth of the company’s subscription services last quarter helped reverse serious holiday season and second quarter shortfalls.Today, Apple announced its fourth quarter 2019 results, top-lined by revenues of $64 billion, slightly higher than the year-ago quarter: Services revenue grew sharply, while earnings from both iPhones and Macs fell somewhat below last year’s levels.Ahead of the announcement, analysts expected sales of $63 billion, up only slightly from actual sales of $62.9 billion in Q4 2018, and $2.83 in estimated earnings per share, down from $2.91 one year ago.“We concluded a groundbreaking fiscal 2019 with our highest Q4 revenue ever, fueled by accelerating growth from Services, Wearables, and iPad,” said Apple CEO Tim Cook.“We’re very optimistic about what the holiday quarter has in store.”For the quarter, Apple says it sold $33.362 billion in iPhones, $6.991 billion in Macs, and $4.656 billion in iPads.
US
There’s also the analytics service IoT SiteWise; the application builder IoT Things Graph; and the cybersecurity suite IoT Device Defender, to name a few others.To get a sense of the IoT landscape through Amazon’s lens just over two months out from the company’s annual AWS re:Invent conference, we spoke with CTO Werner Vogels earlier this week in a phone interview.Conversation topics ranged from the challenges involved in device deployment to the privacy concerns that arise as data from IoT devices is collected and processed.[Some are on] drilling platforms hundreds of miles out to sea, where connectivity is not always stable.IoT Greengrass is often used for these scenarios, which is our IoT environment that can operate independently of the cloud.In these IoT scenarios, it’s not just a matter of IoT — it’s IoT plus intelligent processing so that machine learning can be applied to get insights that improve safety and efficiency.
US
Xiaomi has officially opened its camera technology R hub in Tampere, Finland, three months after the Chinese smartphone giant announced that it had set up a local company in the area.The choice of location is notable, insofar as Nokia built its mobile phone empire in the region, which means there should be an abundance of talent and resources relevant to smartphone technology — Nokia still has a hub in Tampere, where it develops network and cloud management technology.And very much related to this, Nokia and Xiaomi signed a patent and equipment deal two years ago, so the two companies have an existing foundation to build on, even though Nokia was not specifically mentioned as part of today’s announcement.The new site represents Xiaomi’s largest team dedicated to camera technology outside of China, and the initial 20 employees based there will work on machine learning, camera algorithms, signal processing, and image / video processing smarts — “technologies that are driving the R of mobile cameras,” noted Xiaomi Finland R senior director Jarno Nikkanen.“We are a compact team of around 20 people now, but we are quickly scaling up by building up this team, especially talents specialized in camera algorithm.”As smartphone companies dabble with funky new foldable form factors, with varying degrees of success, the main area where manufacturers have been making giant strides in recent years has been in the quality of the camera.
UK
Google plans to help Adobe's Flash exercise its right to be forgotten – by gradually stripping the animated content from its search index, starting some time later this year.Flash was beloved by millions of netizens roughly two decades ago.In the years after its introduction in 1996, Flash provided a development platform that worked consistently across systems despite the quirks of browsers.It offered animation, sound, and interaction that web technology couldn't match at the time.But over the past decade, it has fallen out of favor.It suffered a mortal blow in 2010 when then Apple CEO Steve Jobs banned Flash from iOS because of security and performance issues, not to mention Apple's insistence on platform control.
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