Andy Haas

Andy Haas

Followers 125
Following 24
UK
The UK's Ordnance Survey has followed up the Mars map with a little something to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 landing in its own, distinctive cartographic style.Paul Naylor, programme chair and council member of the British Cartographic Society, spent three weeks painstakingly piecing together data to create the map, which covers 1,350km by 1,000km of the lunar surface at a scale of 1:1,470,000.Wannabe lunar orienteers will be delighted to note the traditional design aesthetic and the classic Ordnance Survey approach to the map, even if their compasses might not be quite as reliable as the output of the venerable British institution.Naylor took the publicly available United States Geological Survey (USGS) 60m-per-pixel Digital Elevatation Model (DEM) of the Moon (courtesy of NASA's LOLA Team and JAXA's SELENE/Kaguya Team).He then imported it into QGIS (an open-source geographic information system).The next step was to locate the Apollo 11 landing site and clip the surroundings for that pleasingly rectangular 1,350km by 1,000km and apply some hill shading to bring out the detail in the terrain.
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Is the Tesco boss right to call for slashed business rates and an online tax to save the high street?Robert Palmer, executive director of Tax Justice UK, says YES.Tesco’s Dave Lewis is right: the way we tax high street shops and online firms isn’t working.The tax system benefits companies like Amazon and Google, which have perfectly legal ways of slashing their bills.Since it’s likely that an online sales tax would be passed onto shoppers, what we really need is a proper shake-up of how we tax multinationals to make them pay their fair share, including by making it much harder to stash corporate profits offshore.Because the current system is based on rental values, if a landlord improves a property, the value goes up and so does the tax.
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In its ongoing quest to slash delivery times and get packages into customers’ hands in as fast a time as possible, Amazon is ever-so-gradually taking increasing control of its gargantuan shipping operation.While it still relies heavily on the likes of FedEx, UPS, and the USPO to get much of the work done, Amazon has also been investing heavily in major transportation projects designed to move its packages across the country before they’re sent out for final delivery.The projects include air cargo transportation hubs for the company’s Prime Air planes that have been criss-crossing the U.S. since 2016.At several dozen aircraft, Amazon’s fleet is still pretty small.But this week the company ramped up its efforts by breaking ground on a 3-million-square-foot cargo facility and 250,000-square-foot loading dock at Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.Local media described the size of the facility as equal to 31 Great American Ballparks.
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The only winning move is not to play, as a wise computer saidThe use of fully automated AI systems in military battles is inevitable unless there are strict regulations in place from international treaties, eggheads have opined.Their paper, which popped up on arXiv [PDF] last week, discusses the grim outlook of developing killing machines for armed forces.The idea of keeping humans in the loop has always been favoured because modern AI systems like neural networks are like black boxes, their inner workings are inherently difficult to understand.Having said that, the trio of researchers – who hail from ASRC Federal, a company focused on supporting US federal intelligence and defense agencies, and the University of Maryland in the US – believe lethal autonomous weapon systems (LAWS) could be employed by the military, anyway.“We explore the implications of increasingly capable AI in the kill chain and how this will lead inevitably to a fully automated, always on system, barring regulation by treaty,” the paper’s abstract stated.
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Victor Vescovo took the journey to what is believed to be the deepest point mankind has visited in any ocean -- finding shocking things from new species to human trash -- and told Fox News on Tuesday that the discovery of plastic in such far reaches proves the need for more vigilance to protect the oceans.He took the Challenger Deep to the Mariana Trench of the Pacific Ocean, calling the depths below “an incredibly peaceful place” in an interview on “Shepard Smith Reporting.”He broke the record for the deepest dive.His dive went 52 feet lower than a 1960 dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench completed by U.S. Navy lieutenant Don Walsh and Swiss engineer Jacques Piccard in a vessel called the bathyscaphe Trieste.Movie director James Cameron made the descent in 2012 but failed to beat out the record.The entire journey took nearly 12 hours — four hours to descend, four hours spent at the bottom, and then about four hours to ascend again.
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Patch Tuesday It’s that time of the month again, and Microsoft has released a bumper bundle of security fixes for Patch Tuesday, including one for out-of-support operating systems Windows XP and Server 2003.Usually support for such aging operating systems costs an arm and a leg, though Redmond has released a freebie because of the serious nature of the critical flaw, assigned CVE-2019-0708, in Remote Desktop Services, or Terminal Services as it was.The vulnerability allows remote code execution with no user involvement or any authentication required, making it a gift to scum looking to spread malware.Basically, find one of countless vulnerable Windows boxes facing the internet or on a network, and send carefully crafted packets to its remote desktop service, if running, to start executing malicious code on the machine.“The vulnerability is ‘wormable’, meaning that any future malware that exploits this vulnerability could propagate from vulnerable computer to vulnerable computer in a similar way as the WannaCry malware spread across the globe in 2017,” the advisory states, referring to the Windows nasty that used stolen NSA exploits to hijack boxes.“While we have observed no exploitation of this vulnerability, it is highly likely that malicious actors will write an exploit for this vulnerability and incorporate it into their malware.
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The software company has made a pretty good run at the hardware industry as of late, however, even outside of the Xbox’s success in the gaming console market.The Microsoft Surface laptops and tablets are particularly good examples of sleek, lightweight, and modern Windows 10 machines, and are great alternatives to gadgets like the iPad, Samsung Galaxy Tab, or MacBook Air for those who simply prefer Microsoft’s OS.The Microsoft Surface tablets and laptops also aren’t as expensive as high-end Apple tech (such as the iPad Pro, to name just one), and a couple of them are on sale right now on Amazon, letting you score one for even cheaper.These two Surface devices are fine options for Windows users, especially if you already use a Windows PC, as they offer file and software compatibility between platforms:The Microsoft Surface Pro 6 is the star of the Surface tablet lineup and remains at the top among our favorite 2-in-1 designs.The Surface Pro 6 by itself is a beefy Windows tablet, but pair it with a keyboard case like the Surface Type Cover and you’ve got a slim, featherweight hybrid laptop that even gives the MacBook Air a serious run for its money.
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On Tuesday, Slack CEO and co-founder Stewart Butterfield appeared to propose to Away co-founder and president Jen Rubio over Twitter.Rubio later tweeted that Buttterfield is kidding — but in the hour or so in between, many Twitter users were confused if this was a real proposal or not.Earlier on Tuesday, Away announced a $1.4 billion valuation and a new round of funding, as the Wall Street Journal reported.And on Monday, Slack held its investor presentation ahead of its own IPO.Slack CEO and co-founder Stewart Butterfield jokingly proposed marriage to Away co-founder and president Jen Rubio over Twitter — but many followers couldn't figure out whether it was a real proposal or not.On Tuesday, the Wall Street Journal reported that Away, the luggage startup, landed a $1.4 billion valuation with a new funding round.
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Eufy may not be a brand that you’re familiar with, but you probably have heard of the company behind it.Eufy is technology manufacturer Anker’s smart home line, and EufyCam is Anker’s wireless security camera offering, which we reviewed earlier this year.Right now Amazon is selling both the two-camera and three-camera systems for up to 20%, but we have a promo code that makes the sale that much better.The two-camera system is currently on sale for $320.But entering the code EUFY88AP at checkout brings the price down to $270, 33% off the retail price.For the three-camera system, the code EUFY55AP brings down the price to $370, $130 better than its current sale price of $500.
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Asset managers are trying more creative and tech-enabled ways to pitch financial advisors, who control $6 trillion of client money in North America.WisdomTree, a $57.2 billion asset manager, found success using artificial intelligence to reshape how its sales team reached out to brokers.For example, just 20% of a random group of financial advisors responded to a cold call about a product, but that percentage tripled when salespeople used a list of specific advisor targets generated by big data techniques.Financial advisors receive more than 50 cold calls a week from asset managers pitching a variety of products.Early results have been promising so far, the firm's former head of data intelligence and strategy Peter Watson said this week at the Digital Wealth Conference in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.Financial advisors control $6 trillion in North America alone, according to a McKinsey study last month.
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During the 2018-2019 TV season, ABC launched seven new series in the fall and four midseason, the company said."This year, we're not trying to jam [viewers] with too many new messages and too many new shows to watch," Karey Burke, who became president of ABC Entertainment last November, said at a press briefing in New York on Tuesday, ahead of Disney's annual upfront pitch to advertisers.Some of them couldn't find or hold audiences.Shows like the comedy "The Kids Are Alright;" the divorce comedy "Splitting Up Together;" the Lauren Cohan-starring dramedy "Whiskey Cavalier;" and "Speechless," centered on a teen with a development disability, were axed after one season.Overall viewership during the first few weeks of the current 2018-2019 fall broadcast season dipped 2% from the year before among the big four broadcasters — ABC, CBS, Fox, and NBC — to an average of 31 million viewers, The Hollywood Reporter wrote in late 2018.In recent years, broadcast networks including ABC started picking up fewer new series.
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It's not really a British summer until the sun is shining, the grass is green, you've got a Pimms in your hand, and the cricket's on the telly.Well, the sun is attempting to shine at least, somewhere up there.And the grass is more of an off-yellow because it's been exposed to sporadic bouts of direct sunlight, but you definitely can't escape the cricket (hence the need for the Pimms), and Now TV is offering a Sky Sports Pass for just £25 a month for four months, saving you more than 25 per cent off the usual price.All 48 ICC Cricket World Cup matches will air on Sky Sports, kicking off on May 30 with England v South Africa, and after that, it's straight into The Ashes starting on August 1.England will face off against Australia over the course of six weeks to win back the Ashes (we hope) that it lost in 2017.The Sports Pass will let you stream all sorts of sports available across 11 Sky Sports channels, like the Netball World Cup which I've just discovered is a thing, as well as the UEFA Nationals League, British Grand Prix, and a plethora of other activities which I know equally nothing about.
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Researchers studying wearable listening technology now have a new data set to use, thanks to University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign graduate student Ryan Corey and his team.Debuting at the International Conference on Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing (ICASSP) this week, the first-of-its-kind wearable microphone impulse response data set is invaluable to audio research for two reasons: First, the data includes up to 80 microphones instead of the usual two showing how is heard on different parts of the body, and second, the data is available for free under an open-access license.The data set consists of more than 8,000 acoustic impulse responses measured at 80 different position on the body.The sound in the recordings came from 24 different directions to simulate noisy crowds.The group, including Corey's adviser, Professor Andrew Singer from the Coordinated Science Laboratory (CSL), and former undergraduate student Naoki Tsuda, spent weeks placing 80 microphones all over a mannequin and Corey himself in the CSL Augmented Listening Laboratory.They then recorded acoustic impulse responses to study the acoustics of the body and whether or not clothes plays a difference in how microphones pick up noise.
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Three 25-year-old men who ran country drug lines were jailed for a total of 12.5 years.HuffPost is part of Oath.Oath and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Oath will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
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A software outage from Sabre, a travel-industry information-technology provider, caused delays for JetBlue on Tuesday morning.A JetBlue representative confirmed to Business Insider that its Sabre-operated systems were working again.Tuesday's incident followed a Sabre outage in April that affected a number of airlines, including JetBlue, American Airlines, and Alaska Airlines.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Sign up for our best stories delivered to your inboxBy clicking Sign Up, you agree to receive marketing emails from Insider Inc. and accept our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
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Possibly the worst thing about gaming online is the verbal abuse.Both kids and adults alike find a newfound freedom when blasting shotgun shells into complete strangers, and it's easy for tensions to run high in competitive environments.Microsoft has updated its code of conduct for online play through Xbox Live, containing some brilliant suggestions of inoffensive trash talk, with such zingers as "get destroyed", "can't believe you thought you were on my level", and – our personal favorite – "that was some serious potato aim".While it's easy to poke fun, it's also dangerous to gloss over the toxic environment that can emerge during online play – and it's reassuring for a console maker to be so explicit over what isn't acceptable.Other guidelines on "Going too far" call out sexual threats, profanity, and racial slurs (as they naturally should).You can see the full list of suggestions in the image below.
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143,000 litres of diesel; 400+ customers, 90+ ISPs; 14 generators; 5 layers of security: a brewery with a differenceThe smell in the Old Truman Brewery is not one of beer, but one faintly of rubber – and the red brick building’s plumbing in London’s Brick Lane area no longer carries pale ale or porter, but terabytes of data; streaming in via purple and gold, black and orange fibre optic cables from cloud providers, stock exchanges and content companies all around the world.The brewery, first built around 1666 AD, is now part of a business park with an eclectic array of customers.Perhaps its largest, though, is also its most discreet: behind an unobtrusive door with attentive guards and five layers of security is one of London’s lowest profile bits of critical national infrastructure; home to floor after floor full of humming server racks.When Computer Business Review visited, the second and third floors of LON3 were still being prepped for business, with cleaners wearing neat hair bags ready to expound on the ISO 14644 standard that they scrub to, but capacity was clearly still available; it’s a competitive market, although few co-location providers can boast a site quite so central.LON3, like its elder siblings on the site, connects clients to 90+ carriers and ISPs, including the specialist networks of the London Internet Exchange (LINX) and the London Access Point (LONAP), for a City-centric client base of blue chips, including many plugged in to the London Stock Exchange; a brisk 20 minutes’ walk southwest.
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Following the effects of the crypto-winter, one Chinese firm has been forced to diversify its business model away from blockchain.It’s chosen industrial hemp as the next addition to its portfolio.Grandshores Technology has historically invested in blockchain-based infrastructure and hardware but is shaping up to buy a 40-percent stake in Chinese industrial hemp producer Hangzhou Yupu Tading, South China Morning Post (SCMP) reports.The purchase would give Grandshores Technology access to cultivating over 1,600 kilos of hemp seeds.The firm hopes it would help it to diversify away from a “lethargic Bitcoin BTC market.”The firm’s co-chairman Yao Yongjie told SCMP the company will decide next year whether cannabis cultivation will become the business’ primary focus.
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The update followed rumors among staff and in the media that he had been fired.Brian Koo, chairman of Honestbee’s board whose venture capital firm Formation Group is a major shareholder, will step in as interim CEO of the Singapore-headquartered firm.Sng is “taking full accountability as CEO for the state of the company.That’s the main reason for stepping down,” Varian Lim, an Honestbee executive, told Tech in Asia.Lim acknowledged the organizational issues that led to today’s state of affairs.“We have grown very significantly in a little over three years.
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Facebook is a stalker that tracks its user's location even when it isn't being accessed.Facebook claims it uses the information harnessed by the Location History to "provide you with location features, including allowing you to post content that's tagged with your location, get more relevant ads, find places and Wi-Fi nearby and use Nearby Friends."It also alleges it uses this data to build a "history of precise locations received through Location Services on your device.When Location History is on, Facebook will add your current precise location to your Location History either when you're using the app or continuously if you've turned on Background Location."Some consider this an invasion of privacy.It's a massive problem given Facebook's consistent failure to protect the privacy of its users as was revealed in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.
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