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It's factory reconditioned, but less than half the price of a new model.
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Some sales include a digital display showcasing the moment being purchased. | Image: Wenew After selling an NFT for $69 million in March, Beeple is making his next big move in the digital art space: he’s launching an NFT platform that’ll sell “iconic” moments in time. The platform, called Wenew, is co-founded by Beeple and some longtime collaborators. They’re also bringing on Ryan Schreiber, the founder of Pitchfork, as Wenew’s editor-in-chief. Schreiber will help curate the moments sold on the platform, which will include highlights from the careers of athletes and artists. “We’re definitely looking at this as sort of immortalizing these moments of human achievement for collectors,” Schreiber told The Verge. Image: Wenew Wenew calls the digital displays “physical artifacts.” Wenew’s first NFT series... Continue reading…
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Changpeng Zhao said the crypto community must learn to properly respond to the tweets, and suggested Musk should be more careful.
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Loans where repayments were overdue for more than a month rose to 9.7% of gross loan portfolio of the industry, rising sharply from 4.1% a year ago..Loans where repayments are overdue for more than three months stood at 4.4%, a jump from 0.8% a year ago and 3.8% in the previous quarter.
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Twitter might lose its safe harbor protection in India, as the company is yet to comply with the country’s new intermediary rules. This means it’ll be liable for all content posted on the site by users and can be subject to penal action. But it’s not straightforward. While there’s no official word, government sources told ANI that it’s the only major social network that hasn’t taken necessary steps to comply with the rules: Twitter to lose its status as intermediary platform in India as it does not comply with new guidelines, it is the only social media platform among mainstream…This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Twitter
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One of Apple’s quietly significant WWDC 2021 announcements must be its planned improvements to ARKit 5’s App Clip Codes feature, which becomes a powerful tool for any B2B or B2C product sales enterprise.Some things just seem to climb off the page When introduced last year, the focus was on offering up access to tools and services found within apps. All App Clip Codes are made available via a scannable pattern and perhaps an NFC. People scan the code using the camera or NFC to launch the App Clip.This year Apple has enhanced AR support in App Clip and App Clip Codes, which can now recognize and track App Clip Codes in AR experiences — so you can run part of an AR experience without the entire app.To read this article in full, please click here
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Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences' IPO consists a fresh issue of ₹200 crore and an offer for sale (OFS) of upto 23.56 million shares by its existing promoters and shareholders. On the upper band price, the OFS will be amounted to ₹1,943. 70 crore
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Both these measures, and more contemplated to ward off the pandemic, would give outsized benefits to the government through improvement in economic growth recovery
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Staying home during the Covid-19 pandemic was an invaluable public health measure that helped to greatly reduce transmission of the virus and save many lives (at least more than the incredible amount of people we lost).But life in lockdown certainly isn’t typical for most of us. It has raised questions about what a year of relative isolation, masking and just general germ-avoidance may have done to our immune systems. Have they been wrecked? Are we basically just babies reborn? Do we need to behave differently now?Of course, many people have been working and learning in-person for months now, while others are just starting to re-emerge. So here is what we know about what happened to people’s immune systems during the pandemic, as well as what to expect as even more people dive back into their old routines. Most adults’ immune systems will NOT have been weakened by isolationPerhaps you’ve heard about the hygiene hypothesis, which is the idea that exposure to certain viruses, bacteria or parasites in childhood helps the immune system develop. Based on that theory, some people are worried that people’s immune systems will be walloped when they go back out into the world, because they haven’t been exposed to many germs over the past year-plus. But experts aren’t concerned.“There is no cause for concern that social distancing has weakened our immune systems,” Sindhura Bandi, an allergy and immunology specialist and associate professor of medicine and paediatrics with Rush University Medical Center, told HuffPost. “By adulthood, we have come into contact with many types of viruses and bacteria. Our immune system has created memory to these pathogens, so that when we come into contact with them we can make antibodies to fight off the disease.”In other words, your body has already spent a lifetime developing antibodies to common illnesses through direct exposure or through vaccination, Bandi explained. One year of staying home and masking (which again, helped fight a deadly pandemic) is not going to drastically change that. That said, you might come down with a cold when you head back into the office ― because you’re going to be around more germs again, and because, yes, your immune system is a bit out of practice.“Our immune systems have not been exposed to common everyday pathogens,” explained Monaa Zafar, a doctor of internal medicine with Westmed Medical Group. She also noted that people’s immunity may have been hampered by other lifestyle changes over the past year — like the fact that many people have been drinking more, sleeping less, coping with chronic stress and not getting outdoors and getting sufficient vitamin D.Experts also have questions about what the 2021-2022 flu season could be like after being virtually nonexistent this past year. There’s some speculation it could be particularly bad as experts struggle to predict which strains to target with next year’s vaccine, though no one really knows.But concerns about a potentially tough flu season don’t have anything to do with people’s immune systems and being sheltered in 2020.People who had Covid-19 might have long-term immune system changes that we don’t totally understand yet While most adults’ immune systems haven’t been changed by the pandemic, some people who were infected with Covid-19 and recovered could, indeed, experience some long-term alterations to their immune system function.“Some patients experienced a significant inflammatory response as the immune system worked to fight the disease,” Bandi said. “Recovery from the illness has led to long-term effects ― commonly referred to as ‘long Covid’ ― which may be tied to the immune system.”Experts are still unravelling what causes some people to come down with long-haul Covid ― or post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC) as it is now officially known ― as well as what causes it. One working theory is that lingering symptoms may stem from a persistent inflammatory or autoimmune response.What all of that means in terms of people’s immune system function as they head back out into the world is still a question — and a pressing one. Estimates suggest up to 1 in 4 Covid-19 patients are long-haulers. Kids might get more coldsThere is a chance that young kids who’ve missed out on a year of nursery or school could be prone to more colds and other infections when they begin spending more time together again.“There are studies that demonstrate that toddlers who attend congregate child care settings, and presumably are exposed to more germs, are less likely to develop viral illnesses, allergies and autoimmune diseases in school,” Bandi said.But context is really key here. Sure, young kids might have a harder time fighting off some common illnesses when they get back to their old routines, but it was essential to keep them isolated for much of the year because it lowered their risk of getting — and spreading — Covid-19.Also, they still have ample opportunities to be exposed to germs down the road.“As the general population becomes vaccinated and we are able to open up again, these young children will have plenty of opportunity for their immune systems to become exposed to and make antibodies to common childhood cold viruses,” Bandi said. Sleep, socialisation and staying home when sick will all be really importantUltimately, there’s no clear scientific evidence that if you engage in certain habits or behaviours you can really directly “boost” your immune system, but taking care of your overall wellbeing certainly won’t hamper how it functions. Doing things like getting plenty of sleep and loading up on nutrients are always good ideas.“Getting six to eight hours of sleep nightly, 150 minutes of exercise weekly, eating whole grains, lean protein, fruit and vegetables in a balanced diet all help strengthen our immune systems,” Zafar said. “I believe the most powerful immune-booster is regular physical activity,” echoed Tuvana Bain, a doctor of internal medicine with Westmed Medical Group. There’s been a lot of talk about how important social connection is for our mental health and well-being, but there may be an important immune-system element to reconnecting with friends and loved ones as the world slowly reopens as well. “As people are able to connect again with family, friends and colleagues, this can have an indirect effect on boosting the immune system,” Bandi said. Indeed, research has linked loneliness to all kinds of poor physical outcomes, from heart disease to decreased levels of certain antiviral compounds in the body.Lastly, it’s going to be really important over this next stretch to avoid the tendency to go into the office or send your kid off to school when sick. Staying home and resting not only gives your own immune system a chance to fight back, it also helps keep other people safe. “In the past, we may try to stick it out for the workday or give our child some Tylenol before sending them off to school to suppress the fever,” Bandi said. “We have to remember there are vulnerable people around us.”The good news is, most of us have become much more attune to how our own behaviours impact the health of others, and we’ve become pretty darn good at basic preventive measures.“Nothing beats frequent hand-washing as the ultimate protection from infection,” Bain said. Experts are still learning about COVID-19. The information in this story is what was known or available as of publication, but guidance can change as scientists discover more about the virus. Please check the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for the most updated recommendations.Related...5 Questions You Probably Have About June 21, AnsweredThe Return To Work Might Not Look As You'd HopedSpeech Droplets Are Really Not Your Friend When It Comes To Covid
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"I don't think $1,000 lumber prices are the new normal," Stockfish told Bloomberg. Lumber stood at $1,168 per 1,000 board feet on Tuesday afternoon.
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Google is rolling out video backgrounds to Meet on the web though it plans to expand the feature to mobile in the coming months.
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A microscopic creature known as the tardigrade, sometimes called a water bear, is extremely tough and resilient. They’re so tough and resilient that NASA has been studying the microscopic creatures in an attempt to learn how they’re able to survive incredibly harsh conditions such as being frozen for decades or being exposed directly to the vacuum of space. The tiny … Continue reading
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For people who are genetically prone to high eye pressure, drinking high levels of caffeine every day may drastically increase the risk of glaucoma. That’s according to a new study led by Mouth Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine, which notes that glaucoma is the top cause of blindness in the United States. In this case, a high level of caffeine … Continue reading
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Tardigrades are found on every continent of the planet and can survive some of the most extreme environments on earth. Tardigrades, also known as water bears, are tiny microscopic creatures with eight legs resembling a bear under the microscope. The tiny creatures can survive some extremely harsh conditions, and NASA wants to understand how they can tolerate these environments. NASA … Continue reading
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(Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech)) Scientists have developed a new neural network capable of detecting coronal holes based on data from space observations. The new application opens up opportunities for improving the accuracy of space weather forecasting and provides valuable information for studying solar cycles.
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In a letter to CEO Tim Cook, some workers express reservations about a "one-size-fits-all" requirement to work on site three days a week.
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MyPillow CEO Lindell has been in a legal battle with Dominion since it filed a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit against him in February.
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An investment fund backed by Xiaomi Corp. is among a new slew of investors in Zongmu Technology Shanghai Co. as the Chinese autonomous driving system startup raised $190 million in its latest funding round
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(Carnegie Mellon University) A team from Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Sao Paulo and Facebook AI Research developed a model that enables a drone to shoot a video based on a desired emotion or viewer reaction. The drone uses camera angles, speeds and flight paths to generate a video that could be exciting, calm, enjoyable or nerve-wracking -- depending on what the filmmaker tells it.
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Eufy has announced four brand-new outdoor cameras, including one with 360-degree pan and tilt capabilities.
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