Carl Dechant

Carl Dechant

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‘Appreciates President Trump’s personal involvement’ and promises so much security, you’ll be tired of securing Microsoft has confirmed it is considering the purchase of made-in-China social network TikTok and that its CEO Satya Nadella has spoken with US president Donald Trump to re-assure him about the security and taxation implications of the putative purchase.…
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An email app created by developers who accused Apple and Google of unfair treatment in the past was just kicked off the latter's Play Store days after its creators went public about their cooperation with lawmakers in an ongoing antitrust investigation. "If this isn't retaliation due to our role in the congressional hearing, then what is?" Blix cofounder Ben Volach tweeted Friday. The company's BlueMail app has been available on the Google Play Store for six years before the cofounders were alerted of the app's suspension Friday morning. Blix has also been kicked off of the Apple app store before in 2018. Apple later came out with an email product that was similar to BlueMail, prompting the cofounders to file a lawsuit against the smartphone maker in 2019. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Google kicked an app off its Google Play Store after its developers contributed questions for the US lawmakers to use during Wednesday's antitrust hearing. Blix cofounder Ben Volach, who created the BlueMail app that was suspended, tweeted the revelation on Friday morning. Brothers Ben and Dave Volach both publicized their cooperation with the antitrust investigation earlier this week, as the Washington Post reported. "If this isn't retaliation due to our role in the congressional hearing, then what is?" Volach tweeted. He also wrote "Apple & Google must be regulated. 2 gatekeepers to rule them all." Google just kicked @BlueMail out of the store w/out notice. We’ve been there for 6+ yrs! If this isn’t retaliation due to our role in the congressional hearing, then what is? @davidcicilline Apple & Google must be regulated. 2 gatekeepers to rule them all @sundarpichai @tim_cook pic.twitter.com/s9TNCcdegF — Ben Volach (@benvol) July 31, 2020   In a screenshot of an email viewed by Business Insider, the Blix developers were told by Google that its BlueMail app was now suspended after a recent review found it "not compliant with one or more of our Developer Program Policies." But according to the company, they were given "zero notice," a move that is "far too coincidental" considering the app is six years old and that it happened so soon after the hearing. "Google either suspended BlueMail because we helped the House Antitrust Subcommittee prepare for the hearings or because Google just launched a competitor to Blix, our BlueMail for Teams product," cofounder Dan Volach said in an emailed statement. "Regardless, the fact that they have the power to kick you out of the store and cut your revenue stream with no notice is nothing short of absurd." The company also told Business Insider that a "lite" version of the BlueMail app, one that customers barely use, remains active on the store as Google apparently only took down the heavyweight version. Google later told Blix, per the Washington Post report, that the BlueMail app was suspended because the company found it to have copied another app. "At minimum they should explain what the issue is, and not just remove it before the weekend," Ben Volach told Business Insider in an interview. The Blix cofounders have openly expressed their complaints regarding Apple and Google and what they say is the two firms' unfair treatment of developers in their respective app stores. "Apple and Google have no respect for their partners and they have too much control over our business," Ben Volach said in a statement sent to Business Insider. "It stifles innovation and tells the developer that it's not safe to bring new ideas to the store." Google and Apple did not immediately respond to Business Insider's requests for comment. Leading up to the hearing, big tech's treatment of third-party app developers was expected to be a major point of scrutiny, especially for Apple. According to Blix, Apple removed the BlueMail app form its own App Store in 2018 ahead of its Worldwide Developer's Conference. Apple later unveiled an email product that was similar to BlueMail, which prompted Blix to file a lawsuit against Apple over claims of patent infringement and antitrust violations. The lawsuit is still ongoing. Apple told Business Insider in an emailed statement that the BlueMail app is currently available on Apple's App Store. "Any suggestion that we manipulate the search algorithm is categorically false," the company said. "We provide all developers with a fair and level playing field on which they can compete." SEE ALSO: A surfaced email shows Apple striking a 2016 deal with Amazon, offering a 15% App Store fee instead of 30% so that the Prime Video app would launch on iPhones Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
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Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Apple CEO Tim Cook, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg were all questioned by Congress earlier this week. Marketing agency SJR provided Business Insider with a look at people's attitudes online toward these tech CEOs before and after Wednesday's hearing.   Their results show that Pichai had the highest positive sentiment prior to the congressional hearing, but he was also the only CEO where positive sentiment decreased afterward. Overall, negative sentiment increased for all four of these CEOs. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Apple CEO Tim Cook, and Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg were questioned, virtually, by Congress on Wednesday about antitrust issues. The antitrust hearing comes after a yearlong investigation by Congress into the digital marketplace operations and competition. It is also the first time that all of them were questioned at the same hearing. This hearing is similar to the antitrust hearing with another tech giant Microsoft back in 1998. Marketing agency SJR has been looking at online attitudes toward top CEOs with the help of social risk advisory firm ENODO Global during the pandemic. The firm gathered news articles and social media posts from across the internet to get a sense of whether attitudes towards those executives are mostly positive or mostly negative based on the language used in those posts. They recently shared with Business Insider an analysis comparing how people were feeling about the four tech executives in late May and early June to sentiments held after this week's congressional hearing. Of these four tech CEOs, the Alphabet CEO was the only one that had a drop in positive sentiment, while the other three CEOs experienced at least a slight increase. Positive sentiment declined by 12 percentage points for Pichai from 51% to 39% of the posts analyzed being mostly positive. However, positive sentiment rose by 15 percentage points for Bezos, who testified in front of Congress for the first time on Wednesday, from 37% to 52%. The following chart highlights the share of mostly positive articles and posts about these CEOs before and after the antitrust hearing.    Changes in negative sentiment varied, but all of the CEOs saw an increase after the hearing. Negative sentiment toward Zuckerberg only increased by two percentage points from 51% to 53% of analyzed articles and posts being mostly negative, while negative sentiment toward Bezos jumped by 16 percentage points from 28% to 44%. The following chart highlights the share of mostly negative articles and posts about these CEOs before and after the antitrust hearing.   SEE ALSO: Lawmakers grilled the CEOs of Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon in a historic House investigation. Here's what happened. DON'T MISS: Wednesday's big tech antitrust hearing has echoes of Bill Gates' and Microsoft's landmark court battle 22 years ago. Here's why the government scrutinized Gates and how it played out for the company. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Pathologists debunk 13 coronavirus myths
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Turn the contents of your camera roll into 3D masterpieces with the LucidPix app, which works on iPhone and Android devices.
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The photos show test vehicles being built and it is getting us even more excited for a drive in a production Bronco.
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Python is great for data exploration and data analysis and it’s all thanks to the support of amazing libraries like numpy, pandas, matplotlib, and many others. During our data exploration and data analysis phase it’s very important to understand the data we’re dealing with, and visual representations of our data can be extremely important. It’s common for us to work on these projects using Jupyter notebooks because they’re great, fast, simple, and they allow us to interact and play with our data. However there are limitations to what we can do, normally when we work with charts we use libraries like… This story continues at The Next Web
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Photo by Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images Starting at 12PM ET on Wednesday, July 29th, the leaders of the tech industry are appearing before a congressional subcommittee to defend their business practices. Much of the run-up to the hearing has been centered on the unprecedented guest list, which includes CEOs from Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google. It will be the first time some of the men have appeared in front of Congress and by far the most significant hearing since the antitrust against Microsoft in the late ‘90s. How to watch the antitrust hearing The House Judiciary live-streams proceedings from the committee’s official YouTube page, and the same stream is available on the committee’s website. We’ve also embedded it in this post, so you’ll be able to watch from here. W... Continue reading…
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Today, just a couple of hours ago, Nubia held a new product launch conference. Apart from the much anticipated Red Magic 5s gaming smartphone, it ... The post Nubia Watch With Flexible OLED Display Officially Uncovered appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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As modern, containerized applications continue to prove popular with organizations, it was only a matter of time before the major vendors started to offer container infrastructure and management “as-a-service.”Use of containers is firmly on the rise with enterprises globally, with 65 percent of organizations stating they use Docker containers, and 58 percent using the Kubernetes orchestration system in some manner, according to Flexera’s latest 2020 State of Cloud report.To read this article in full, please click here
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That cloudy CRM firm paid ransom doesn't fill anyone with confidence British universities are waking up to last week's ransomware attack on cloud CRM purveyor Blackbaud – though it appears some haven't realised the American software company paid the ransom.…
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Missed the Xbox Games Showcase? Here's the Xbox Series X games event as it happened.
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Python rules the roost, but Cobol gets a pandemic bump
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It looks like many of us are going to be pretty much stuck at home for the foreseeable future, and it’s possible that you’ve already binged all of the series that your friends and family have recommended. Don’t despair! If you’re still looking for series to lose yourself in, there are still plenty out there. We went to the staff of The Verge to ask what they recommended for a solid week, month, or (gulp!) year of indoor viewing. Here’s what we came up with. Bunheads Photo by Adam Taylor / ABC Family Is there anything Sutton Foster can’t do? I saw her tear up the Broadway stage in Anything Goes, and she made me tear up at her off-Broadway performance in Sweet Charity. I am currently loving her in the long-running... Continue reading…
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NowRx CEO Cary Breese came up with the idea of automating prescription delivery in 2015 after waiting in three different lines to get his pain medication. NowRx recently crowdfunded $20 million in series B funding on SeedInvest, the most ever for that platform. Breese said he was attracted to crowdfunding because it allows him more control over the company than typical VC funding, which "doesn't have a great track record in health care." The COVID-19 pandemic has brought an uptick in business for many medication delivery startups like NowRx from patients looking to avoid contact with other people. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. NowRx CEO Cary Breese first came up with the idea of speeding up prescription delivery in 2015, after a day of waiting in lines to get pain medication for his injured knee. "I had to stand in line just to drop off a piece of paper," Breese said. "Then I sat down and got up to get in another line just to pay them, then sat down again. I stood in a third line just to talk to a pharmacist." The idea to eliminate this time-waster burst on Breese, a software veteran, because he had just been in the midst of a multi-week brainstorming session with friend and former colleague Sumeet Sheokand. They'd been scoping out industries struggling with inefficient systems and dated technology that they could innovate on.   "I just walked out and called my cofounder [Sheokand] and said, 'How come no one's changed the way pharmacies work?'" Breese said. "I can get a car to take me wherever I want… I can get my groceries delivered, I can order anything I want from Amazon. Why are we all still waiting in line at the pharmacy?" From there Breese and Sheokand developed NowRx, a startup that aims  to eliminate pharmacy waits by automating the prescribing process and delivering meds via HIPAA-certified  drivers straight to customer's doorsteps. The company announced on July 15 it raised $20 million in Series B funding through SeedInvest. Breese said it was the highest total ever for that crowdfunding platform. See the pitch deck NowRx used, below. "We now have thousands and thousands of investors that are cheerleaders for our company," Breese said. Crowdfunding appealed to Breese because it allowed him to grow the startup on his own timeline. "Venture capital doesn't have a great track record in health care," Breese said. "And I think it comes down to the standard attitude of 'growth at all costs,' and 'move fast and break things.'" This year has been a boom time for NowRx, according to Breese. He said the company has seen a large bump in revenue and number of customers compared to the same time last year, an uptick he attributes to both cumulative growth and the COVID-19 pandemic. "There's a lot of customers and patients out there with underlying health conditions that are looking for options so they don't have to go out into a crowded brick-and-mortar store and risk further exposure," Breese said. The pandemic has caused a spike in business for other medication delivery startups as well. Birth control delivery startups Nurx and The Pill Club both told Crunchbase's Sophia Kunthara they'd significantly expanded the number of patients using their services since the start of the U.S. outbreak. Fellow same-day prescription delivery startup Alto Pharmacy pulled in $250 million in funding from Softbank on January 30, days after the first identified case of COVID-19 in the U.S.  was announced. Check out the pitch deck NowRx used to crowdfund $2o million: Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
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Former US vice president Joe Biden and former secretary of state Hillary Clinton lambasted the Trump administration’s response to the coronavirus pandemic on Monday, saying the president lacked empathy and had failed the American people as cases of Covid-19 surge around the nation. The pair both appeared for interviews on Joy Reid’s debut news program on MSNBC, “The ReidOut,” on Monday to discuss Donald Trump’s ongoing response to the coronavirus. Both had harsh appraisals of the federal response amid reports that cases have continued to skyrocket in a majority of the US and that the White House had pushed to block new funding for testing and tracing in the next coronavirus relief bill.“There is no leadership here. He’s surrendered. He raised the white flag. He has no idea what to do. Zero,” Biden said during a sweeping interview. “It’s only one thing he has on his mind: How does he win reelection. And it doesn’t matter how many people get Covid and/or die from Covid.” "He has no idea what to do," Joe Biden says of Pres. Trump's coronavirus response. "It's only one thing he has in mind. How does he win reelection and it doesn't matter how many people get COVID and/or die from COVID ... I've never seen a president who has been so self-serving." pic.twitter.com/ipF3FP7J1Z— MSNBC (@MSNBC) July 20, 2020Seven states and Puerto Rico reported Monday that a record number of patients were hospitalised with severe illnesses due to the coronavirus. More than 3.8 million people have tested positive for the virus in the US and more than 140,000 have died. At the same time, Trump has maintained that the coronavirus will “disappear” one day.“I’ll be right eventually,” the president told Fox News host Chris Wallace on Sunday. “You know, I said, it’s going to disappear. I’ll say it again: It’s going to disappear. And I’ll be right.”Such comments prompted Clinton, who lost the 2016 election to Trump, to say Trump wasn’t up to the nation’s top job while noting that anyone “who has watched over the last four years has to be concerned.”“Clearly he has failed,” Clinton told Reid. “He’s failed at the most fundamental job of being president. He doesn’t seem up to the job. He doesn’t seem capable of having the attention, the concentration, the focus, the discipline, to stay with the problem.” Hillary Clinton discusses foreign interference in 2016 and 2020 elections: "It's very clear that Russia succeeded. They believe that they were able to influence the minds and even votes of Americans, so why would they stop? They really want to pursue their agenda of dividing us." pic.twitter.com/kDz3y6L29g— MSNBC (@MSNBC) July 20, 2020Biden added earlier in the hour that Trump appeared to be solely focused on winning the election rather than responding to the crisis, pointing to his calls for the country to reopen against medical advice and the president’s efforts to ostracise those who disagree with him. The White House has in recent days moved to undercut the advice of Dr Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, who has continued to give the public bleak assessments of the pandemic even amid the reopening push from Trump. “This guy has no sense of empathy or concern for people. People are dying,” Biden told Reid on Monday. “He has made every serious mistake, and he has absolutely bludgeoned people that disagree with him.”Related... Donald Trump Thinks '100 Minus Seven' Is A 'Very Hard' Question Donald Trump Suggests He Will Not Accept Presidential Election Result If He Loses 9 Charts That Show Just How Bad The Coronavirus Situation Is In The US
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Based on the information gleaned from official documents, a new functionality could turn the accessory into a powerful tool.
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If you’re waking up just now like me, all of us missed Twitter‘s most dramatic and biggest hack of all time. Here’s what happened: some hackers took over accounts of many high profile accounts such as Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Apple, Uber, Kim Kardashian, and Bill Gates, and tweeted about…well, Bitcoin. The hacker(s) even successfully got some money from folks who fell for the scam. As Bitcoin transactions are traceable to an extent, you can see how much money a Bitcoin wallet address is holding. The wallet being linked to the hackers shows that they managed to steal nearly $120,000 from people. It's… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Twitter
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Country to be hit with £2bn cost, massive tech delay after firm 'materially compromised' by US's latest sanctions D-day has finally arrived for Huawei in Britain: UK.gov will outlaw the purchase of Huawei gear to build 5G networks by the end of this year, and from 2027 the country's mobile networks must eradicate the Chinese vendor's kit from their 5G infrastructure.…
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I was never a fan of the Call of Duty franchise, but its battle royale format, Warzone, has won me over. I love its pace, the fictitious city of Verdansk where battle takes place, and all the little details like custom loadouts and infinite respawns that make the gameplay so dynamic. I also appreciate the fact it’s free-to-play (even though you’ll probably end up buying the full game if you care about leveling up your weapons). But there’s one thing about Warzone that absolutely infuriates me: it’s painfully easy to get irreversibly stuck at any random spot. Protip: Don’t go prone while using a Buy Station… This story continues at The Next Web
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The short-term rental industry has seen two big trends during the pandemic: a collapse in demand leading to liquidity challenges for urban operators, and a surge in demand for rural properties.  Airbnb-backed Lyric has shrunk to a single hotel in New York after slashing staff. Stay Alfred, one of the earliest venture-backed short-term rental companies, has shut down entirely.  But Sonder, the largest venture-backed short-term rental operator, and CorpHousing Group, a privately-owned operator, say they picked up more urban properties during the pandemic. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. It's become one of the classic images of the coronavirus era: city-dwellers renting an Airbnb in a rural area a couple hours outside of the city, looking to trade a cramped quarantine for open air and trees.  More recently, these same locations have seen another big bump, as vacationers look to more local rural and beach destinations instead of cities or international trips. Airbnb said on Wednesday that rural hosts in the US earned 25% more this June than they did in June of last year.  Meanwhile, rental operators focused on urban markets have struggled. Airbnb-backed Lyric, once one of leaders of the space, has shrunk to a single hotel in New York after slashing staff. Stay Alfred, one of the earliest venture-backed short-term rental companies, has shut down entirely.  Short-term rental operators run networks of professional Airbnb stays, providing accommodations with hotel-like amenities and trendy decor to tourists and business travelers. They are essentially property managers for vacation and travel properties, though many of them actually pay leases instead of being paid a fee for managing a property.  But with some downsizing their portfolios, landlords have been eager to offload those properties to other operators with experience running a short-term rental business. Surviving players say that's creating an environment where they can scoop up new locations to bet on an eventual comeback in urban-focused travel.  We spoke to the CEO of Sonder, the largest venture-backed short-term rental company, and the CEO of CorpHousing Group/SoBeNy, a private short-term rental company, about why they are doubling down in cities instead of heading for the country. Growing in a pandemic As the pandemic ground travel close to a halt, operators were forced to reevaluate their portfolios. Some, unable to pay their rent, negotiated with their landlords to reduce rents, change fixed leases to more fungible management contracts, or even exit leases. Francis Davidson, Sonder's CEO and founder, told Business Insider that the ability to sign deals for properties that they wouldn't have had access to before the pandemic is one "silver lining." Davidson said that the company has signed some management contracts, but that it has mostly continued to sign leases. Davidson said that the company plans to add hundreds of properties, funded by its recent $170 million fundraise. Sonder's $225 million July 2019 fundraise valued the company just north of $1 billion, while this June's fundraise brought its value up to $1.3 billion. "We view the next 12 to 18 months as a really great time to grow," Davidson said. Sonder has been able to bring back or restore hours for over 100 employees since slashing staff at the height of the pandemic, he said.  The company is focusing its expansion on the European market, where it has properties in London, Edinburgh, Rome, and Dublin, and is also continuing to expand in US markets to locations that are able to be licensed as hotels. Davidson said that Sonder had also dumped some properties during the thick of the pandemic, but many of them the company had already planned to leave because they were economic under performers, underwhelmed guest's expectations, or the regulatory environment had shifted. The company is exiting every non-hotel-licensed property it holds in New York and San Francisco, where it isn't allowed to accommodate stays shorter than 30 days, by either declining to renew the lease or reaching an agreement with the landlord to exit early. Sonder sued one San Francisco landlord this week to exit a property that it began to lease last year, citing an early-termination clause because the city and state's response to the pandemic "crippled Sonder's efforts to draw potential tenants to the premises." Brian Ferdinand, the CEO of CorpHousing Group and SoBeNy (the front-end and marketing arm of the business) said that the company has actually doubled the number of units it operates since the start of the pandemic, with potential to grow even larger because of partnership deals it has signed with 26 different landlord partners.  "We probably will be able to do in 10 months what we thought we would do in 10 years," Ferdinand said. Ferdinand said that the company has grown "naturally" by finding properties that had not previously been short-term rentals and by acquiring properties that other companies had stopped operating.  Read more: Here's which real-estate tech startups will soar and which will flop in the new normal of how we occupy space, according to 7 top proptech VCs These newly-empty properties became targets for well-capitalized players looking to expand, setting off a wave of consolidation in the short-term market, according to Omer Rabin, managing director at short-term rental software company Guesty.  Guesty's software helps short-term rental operators big and small manage their properties, acting as the digital connection between operators, guests, and the marketplaces like Airbnb that they operate on. As a result, the company has a close view on operators' inventory, pricing, and occupancy. Rabin said that the fact that operators are willing to take over these empty properties is a sign that some players are betting that the asset will come back stronger than ever after the virus. He also said that these properties may be cheaper now that the coronavirus is lowering rental prices and pressuring the sector.  Though Stay Alfred and Lyric are the most public examples of short-term rental companies that backed out of a large amount of properties, other companies have also released non performers. Outlook for short-term rentals in cities Rabin told Business Insider that urban markets are seeing a rebound of occupancy rates, but that the average daily rate charged for a unit has slipped substantially. Ferdinand said that CorpHousing Group is continuing to focus on urban markets because they are operationally easier to run at scale, and because he expects their original strategy to hold true after a recovery.  Rural properties, by their nature, are less plentiful and further apart, making it a challenge to acquire enough to make it feasible for a larger operator to keep them clean and functioning. Ferdinand focuses on new properties in cities that have major hospitals, universities, convention centers, and corporate headquarters that will draw potential guests in. As a result, the company was able to sign three national deals with nursing agencies at the start of the pandemic.  "The urban core, we believe, saved our business," Ferdinand said. Read more: Hospitality startup Sonder is pushing ahead with plans to open its largest NYC apartment hotel yet Playbook for surviving the pandemic Of course, the companies first need to weather the pandemic.  One key strategy was to try to lure some of the only people traveling during the thick of the pandemic: nurses and other essential workers. While CorpHousing Group worked directly with nursing agencies, Sonder offered a 40% discount for traveling nurses. This was essential to help pay the rent, Rabin said, even though many operators who did this saw their revenue compared to costs crater from three to four times down to less than one time the cost.   There is also something of a silver lining to less frequent travel: guests they do have are staying for a longer period of time. Ferdinand said his companies' average stay has increased to 63 days up from approximately 30 days before the pandemic. To be sure, with money likely to still go out the door, the firms also had to think of firming up their balance sheet. CorpHousing Group, which is small and self-funded, applied for and received a Paycheck Protection Loan in order to protect 58 jobs. PPP loans were part of the federal response to the coronavirus, offering forgivable, low-interest loans to small businesses. Ferdinand said the PPP loan kept the company from having to furlough or cut any employees. Venture-backed competitor Blueground confirmed to Business Insider it had received a PPP loan, Lyric Hospitality was listed as having been approved for a PPP loan but didn't comment when asked by Business Insider about the loan. Zeus Living applied for and then returned a PPP loan. Sonder is venture-backed and had too many employees to apply for a PPP loan. The company instead laid off or furloughed a third of its staff or roughly 400 employees.  How short-term rental companies renegotiated leases Sonder, which mostly signs master leases instead of management agreements, has worked out a clause that lets them pay a lower cost during a recession into 80% of the leases they've signed since 2018, a time in which they've grown rapidly. The company also includes a "mark-to-market" clause in lease renewals which allows them to renew at current market price, which has been beneficial as the residential markets in big cities are sliding. Davidson also said that the company signs shorter leases, which may require higher prices, but allow much greater flexibility. Ferdinand said that CorpHousing Group is focused on signing revenue-share agreements with landlords instead of leases, which allows the company to grow at the speed it has.  CorpHousing Group is a tenant in properties owned by some of the largest landlords and operators like The Related Companies, Vantage Management, and Boston Properties. Ferdinand said that CorpHousing Group's private ownership also allowed him to operate the company in the way that he thought would be most successful, even if that meant the business taking high losses during the worst of the crisis while also spending money to expand. He said the business was profitable before the pandemic. Sonder's Davidson said that the company's ability to survive and even grow during the pandemic indicated to investors that the company would be a safe place to put their money. "I'm interested in building a company that's around in 100 years from now," Davidson said. "It has to be really antifragile."  Axel Springer, Insider Inc.'s parent company, is an investor in Airbnb. Correction: The original article stated that Sonder has added hundreds of properties since the start of the pandemic. It has been amended to say that Sonder plans to add hundreds of properties,  Read more: A growing group of lenders are looking to unload hundreds of millions of dollars of souring hotel loans. Teams hired to sell the portfolios say it's just the beginning of a surge in activity. After 2 layoff rounds, a valuation nosedive, and chaotic landlord negotiations, Airbnb-backed Zeus Living is shifting its business model. Here's how the corporate-housing startup is moving forward.SEE ALSO: Billions of dollars of Las Vegas development hang in the balance right now, but the owner of Caesars Palace sees the city's crisis as an opportunity to imagine its next mega-project. SEE ALSO: Here's the pitch deck used to raise a $4.4 million seed round for an AI chatbot looking to transform how people find apartments Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Tax Day is now July 15 — this is what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
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(University of Texas at Dallas) The University of Texas at Dallas' Polycraft World, a modification of the video game Minecraft, is serving as the foundation for federal research to develop smarter artificial intelligence (AI) technology. UT Dallas researchers received a grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to use Polycraft World to simulate dynamic and unexpected events that can be used to train AI systems -- computer systems that emulate human cognition -- to adapt to the unpredictable.
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(Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH)) POSTECH research team designs a halide perovskite material for the next-generation memory device. Commercialization is accelerated for next-generation data storage device via low-operating voltage and high-performance resistive switching memory.
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The MacBook crack’d: case of the damaged display solved by Apple.
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Like many of you, I suspect, I thought that the days of whacking "cyber" onto another word to make it sound cool and futuristic were done, left to rot back in the pre-dot-com bust 1990s.Unfortunately, Tesla's Elon Musk seems dead set on bringing those dark days back, because the Big T registered "Cybertruck" as a trademark ahead of its planned unveiling on Nov. 21, according to a report published Thursday by Teslarati.In its report, Teslarati pointed out that TeslaMotorClub forum user GenSao located documents on the United States Patent and Trademark Office's (USPTO) Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS) that showed not only the trademark filing for "Cybertruck" but also for the even more annoying "Cybrtrk" and its accompanying hard-to-read logo.These filings were all made on the same day -- just Nov. 6 of 2019, which seems to us like Tesla was either playing its cards really, really close to its vest or -- and we feel like this is more likely -- hadn't actually decided what to call the damned thing until a few weeks before its debut.Tesla didn't immediately respond to Roadshow's request for comment.
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We’ve seen foldable screens in a few devices like the Galaxy Fold and Huawei Mate X, but while those are meant to double as tablets, Razr’s here to bring the more pocketable clamshell form factor back to the modern smartphone era.As a 90’s kid whose first phone was a flip phone, I saw many Razrs “back in the day,” and it is a neat bit of nostalgia to open and close a phone old-school.From its external display, to the Razr thinness, and even the distinctive chin which now houses the antenna and a speaker, the new Razr is reminiscent of the classic when closed.The screen has a nano-coating for splash-resistance, but there’s no IP rating on the Razr for dust or water resistance.That worries me a bit, and makes me think I might want to limit how often I open the screen, as I have no reference for how many cycles it can go through.The company did describe the hinge’s bi-stable, “zero-gap” design, which Motorola says it aimed to make “assistive, reliable, and durable.” The moving pieces in the hinge make the Razr feel stable when closed and when open.
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We still have three weeks left until Black Friday but the VPN deals, sales and offers are already rolling in.NordVPN has just dropped its Black Friday VPN deal and we have to say it's pretty great - you get up to 70% discount on its 36 months plan, meaning you'd be getting the next three years of all your VPN needs sorted for $3.49 (£2.82) a month.This is a remarkable discount for a VPN provider, but what makes this deal extra special is that it's from NordVPN - which is a VPN provider known for it's high quality, ease-of-use and fast connection speeds.With NordVPN, you can unblock Netflix and iPlayer, have six connections on one account and can connect to more than 5,500 servers.Click here to get a fantastic 70% discount on NordVPNOf course for a deal this good there has to be a slight catch, and for this it's that you'll have to pay the total cost of the three years upfront.
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Software survivor celebrates middle age with faceliftFile transfer veteran Laplink has taken advantage of the impending demise of Windows 7 to remind those faced with a migration challenge that it still exists.It is hard to not to feel a twinge of nostalgia at the word "Laplink" as one recalls the serial cables and floppy disks of three decades ago used to migrate data from one PC to another in the pre-connected world.Or even the breathtaking performance of that parallel cable.Microsoft does not publish a list of what is compatible with Windows 10...Of course, Laplink and the world have moved on, and the company this week pulled the covers from a substantial update to its PCmover Enterprise tool.
US
The original Tile wasn't ideal for tracking small stuff, though -- designed to slip on a keychain, you couldn't easily use it on a camera or a TV remote.Last month, though, Tile introduced the Sticker, which does just what the name suggests.Thanks to some 3M adhesive, it sticks securely to almost anything, and measuring just an inch in diameter, it's discreet enough to put on almost anything.And now through Black Friday, if you get an 8-pack of Tile Stickers, Tile will throw in a Google Nest Mini for $100.Tile doesn't ordinarily sell an 8-pack of Stickers, but the 4-pack lists for $80 and is also on sale right now for $60.The new Tile Sticker has a range of about 150 feet and works with a combination of Bluetooth and Tile's crowdsource network, which means you're more likely to find a lost item if you live near other people who also have Tile trackers.
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