Carlton Barr

Carlton Barr

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(Samara Polytech (Samara State Technical University)) The research team that includes Samara Polytech scientists obtained monoclinic NaVPO4F by solid-state synthesis using quenching and showed that sodium ions were inactive.
The upcoming phone may have a Qualcomm Snapdragon 765G
Apple has produced a superb all-in-one computer, but what about everyone else?
(Cell Press) Integrating first-of-its-kind washable hydrogel electrodes with a pulse sensor, researchers from the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed smart eyewear to track eye movement and cardiac data for physiological and psychological studies. The eyewear -- known as Chesma and presented August 20 in the journal Matter--provides accurate measurements in an everyday environment without compromising users' comfort.
(University of Utah) Over the course of the coronavirus epidemic, COVID-19 outbreaks have hit communities across the United States. As clusters of infection shift over time, local officials are forced into a whack-a-mole approach to allocating resources and enacting public health policies. Geographers led by the Univeristy of Utah hope that timely, localized data will help inform future decisions, and one day predict where hotpots will emerge.
So much for trying to stop social media addictions.
In recent times, there has been a whole lot of information regarding the upcoming Sony PlayStation 5 and Microsoft Xbox Series X. As of now, ... The post Sony PS5 & Microsoft XSX prices and launch date revealed – Rumour appeared first on Gizchina.com.
We’re here to guide you through the coronavirus pandemic. Sign up to the Life newsletter for daily tips, advice, how-tos and escapism.Recessions aren’t pretty, and the UK is in a big one – the largest one on record, to be precise, after the coronavirus pandemic sent the economy plunging by 20.4% between April and June. A recession is defined as two successive quarters of decline in gross domestic product (GDP). And we’re now facing that because lockdown meant many businesses shut up shop for a long period of time – resulting in the red drop on the graph below.Related... How To Prepare For The Uncertainty Of A Recession Monthly figures showed the economy bounced back by 8.7% in June, following upwardly revised growth of 2.4% in May, as lockdown restrictions eased. While this is positive, it’s nowhere near where it needs to be.But these percentages and graphs don’t tell us much about how our lives will actually change. Rather than stats on GDP growth, you probably want to know: what does a recession mean for me?We’ll break it down for you. (You might want to grab a brew.)Your job could take a hitThe impact of the recession has already been felt by tens of thousands of people in the UK who’ve lost their jobs since the pandemic hit. Some industries have been totally decimated, with people forced to look for jobs in different fields due to not knowing when their industry will return – if ever. The jobs market is also incredibly competitive, as thousands apply for the same roles. Dr Kemar Whyte, a senior economist at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR), tells HuffPost UK most of the impact from the recession will be on people’s jobs and incomes.“When there’s a recession, there will be a lot of job loss,” he says. “It’s also quite unlikely you’ll have people getting salary increases and promotions. So our finances will be affected by this.”With incomes affected across the board, this is likely to have a knock-on effect on everything else. “A lot of life hinges on the money that we earn and this is where all of the issues will stem from,” he says.Related... Here's How To Get Your Finances In Order For A Recession Your living situation could be affectedLoss of income can have repercussions on the housing sector, because tenants may no longer be able to pay rent, which will affect access to housing, says Dr Whyte. This can also lead to landlords selling up, rather than facing the prospect of fronting up costs themselves. If that doesn’t happen, a recession can also see the price of rent go up, points out Adam McKay from The Tenants Voice, a website offering expert advice and support for renters.There’s already been talk of young people – and even people in their 30s – moving back in with their parents due to loss of income or lack of job opportunities because of the pandemic.While the government’s stamp duty holiday has given people impetus to move, the recession might mean that house prices drop because there are more houses on the market and less demand as people are losing their jobs. So, if you’re selling, your property might not sell for as much as you’d hoped. But if you’re buying, you might get a bargain. Taking out a mortgage might be harder as banks will want to lend less money overall – this means you could be asked to stump up a bigger mortgage deposit than usual, but would also mean your monthly mortgage payments should be lower. If you’re looking to buy, now’s the time to speak to a mortgage broker as they can help you navigate the trickiness of it all. Related... What The Stamp Duty 'Holiday' Changes Will Mean For You Prices might drop... and then riseUsually, inflation tends to fall during a recession, so things become a bit cheaper as there’s less demand in the economy for goods.Professor Ratula Chakraborty, an expert in business management at the University of East Anglia, predicts prices will be pretty flat for most goods, while there’s less demand and key input costs, like oil prices, remain low. “Indeed, we could see deflation for some goods as consumers become reluctant to spend money when fearing they’re at risk of losing their jobs,” she says.But the exception might be where Brexit creates problems, she suggests, with international trade and increases in transport costs and delays. This could mean some fresh food prices might rise, and we might also see higher prices on medicines where importing goods becomes more expensive.Dr Whyte believes we might also see inflation caused by the easing of the pandemic. “At the moment, because demand is tempered now due to people not having as much income, people not working as much, and because of social distancing, we don’t have as much demand for products – so we don’t have that demand pull inflation at the moment,” he explains.Related... When Will Social Distancing End In The UK? But as more businesses begin to reopen, we might see prices go up because companies are trying to claw back some of the money they lost during the prolonged period of being closed. “We might have some cost push inflation because firms will face higher costs and firms will try to make up what they’ve lost during this,” he says. “From personal experience, when my barber reopened he immediately told me it would be £10 extra for my haircut.”Alongside this, we have “pent-up demand” from consumers, because everything has been closed. Dr Whyte says when lockdown measures are fully eased and social distancing becomes a thing of the past, “we will then see some potential price rises”. Great.Taxes will go upNobody likes to talk taxes, but the reality is that to pay off the huge debts the UK has accrued during the pandemic, taxes will inevitably rise.“It has to [rise],” says Dr Whyte. “But not immediately, because right now there’s a lot of pressure on businesses and consumers alike. At the moment I don’t foresee, or think that there should be, any sort of tax rise. I think it’ll come next year.”What kind of taxes we’ll see is another story. “The job on the government’s hands now is how it goes about administering this tax increase,” says Dr Whyte. One option might be to raise income tax, but there’s also the option to instigate a wealth tax, he says. This is pretty much what it says on the tin: a tax on net worth meaning rich people would get taxed more, which would help to reduce widening inequality.Prof Chakraborty expects to see stealthy tax changes rather than blatant ones, such as increasing “sin taxes”, like on alcohol and tobacco, on the justification of supporting public health measures.Related... I’m A Millionaire, And I Want To Be Taxed More To Help The Economy Recover From Covid-19 Low-paid workers and young people will be hit hardest“What normally happens in a recession, and it’s very likely in this particular recession, is that the impact isn’t normally felt equally across income levels,” says Dr Whyte. “It’s usually those lower-skilled or lower-paid workers that are normally more affected by a recession. This will obviously then exacerbate the inequality issue that’s currently present in the UK – and worldwide.”It’ll also impact young people disproportionately, as we saw from the recession in 2008. “Recessions have a lasting impact on those affected in terms of lost income and lost job opportunities for career progression,” says Prof Chakraborty, “and we can expect this particular recession to be especially hard on young adults seeking their first jobs or at risk of losing their jobs in service sectors greatly affected by lockdowns and travel restrictions.”Are there any positives?It’s pretty easy to feel disheartened by all of this, but it’s worth noting recessions can also be places where people find their feet – for example, if they find a gap in the market with a business idea or offer a product that’s in high demand.Ultimately though, recessions are tough – and in the coming months (and years) we’ll need to be kind to ourselves and simply do the best we can. Related... Is It Even Worth Booking A Holiday Abroad Right Now? Sharmadean Reid Is Fighting For A Workplace That Actually Works For Mums While You ‘Eat Out To Help Out’, This Is The Reality For Waiting Staff
How testing a 4K projector in a new home changed my expectations of home projection technology – and why it could change yours too.
Selling Sunset star Christine Quinn has insisted she has no issues with being perceived as the show’s “villain”, despite having received death threats from disgruntled viewers in the past.Christine has been a part of the Selling Sunset cast since its debut, having worked with the Oppenheim Group even before cameras started rolling on the Netflix reality show, and has been at the centre of plenty of drama across the last three series.But even if her antics have led some fans to think of her as Selling Sunset’s “villain”, Christine has said this is not a label she has an issue with.“I guess I am the quote-unquote ‘show villain’,” she told People magazine. “But I love it. I think it’s funny and I think people enjoy it at the end of the day, people that love me really love me. When I’m on camera, I have fun with it.”She continued: “I understand that I’m being showcased in 100-plus countries across the world, and I have a background in comedy. I love to make people laugh, and my whole goal in life has just been to entertain people and make them feel something.“Whether it’s perceived well, I don’t know, but I’m really just being myself. I do have a heart of gold underneath that, and I think sometimes with television, it’s really hard to see all the elements of a human being on a television show.”However, in the same interview, she did admit that seeing herself on screen for the first time did initially make her alter her behaviour on set.Christine recalled: “We definitely were a little more reserved going into season two. I was scared. I was a little scared.“The first few episodes of season two, the editors were like, ‘Where’s the other Christine? Where’s Christine?’, I’m like, ‘Well, that Christine gets death threats’.”“People are so invested in the show, and they see what they see and just think I’m this crazy person,” she added, when pressed on the death threats she’d received. “It’s just unfortunate. People are weird.”Christine is at the centre of one of series three’s biggest storylines, which saw her finally marrying Christian Richard, although she recently admitted she was less than impressed with her how big day was portrayed on screen.“I was a little disappointed. It just didn’t really showcase the way that it was,” she claimed.“The wedding was the best day of my life and it was hard for me to watch it on the television show because that’s not really the way that I remember it.”Christine continued: “I understand they wanted to get certain storylines in there, but this was actually my day. This was my day, and I was just disappointed in the way it was perceived on camera and translated, unfortunately.“I’m not going to lie, I was crying when I watched it. I was like ‘This is not my wedding, this is not my wedding’.”MORE SELLING SUNSET: Selling Sunset Isn't Just Serious Property Porn – Its Drama Makes The Real Housewives Look Tame Who Was A Playboy Playmate And 15 Other Things You Didn't Know About The Stars Of Selling Sunset Christine Quinn 'Disappointed' With How Wedding Is Portrayed On Selling Sunset: 'I Cried When I Watched It'
Cash-strapped privacy devs face determined miscreants who keep coming back for more The Tor Project has confirmed someone, or some group, is in control of a large number of Bitcoin-snaffling exit nodes in its anonymizing network, and it's battling to boot them off.…
The phone is available from Motorola, AT&T and T-Mobile.
A new study from Harvard University has linked childhood trauma with changes in how fast one experiences biological aging. Known as adverse events in early life, this trauma can vary and include things like neglect, living in poverty, violence in the household, and similar things. Past research has linked these experiences with poor health outcomes later in life; the latest … Continue reading
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