Christopher Johnson

Christopher Johnson

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(Duke University) Biomedical engineers at Duke University have shown that the effectiveness of a two-pronged type 2 diabetes treatment increases when the drugs are linked by a heat-sensitive tether rather than concurrently administered. The combination molecule forms a gel-like depot under the skin that slowly releases the drug. These findings suggest that this approach to combination drug design could be applied to disease therapies beyond diabetes.
Endoculus will make your next colonoscopy more robotic, if not more comfortable
Y Combinator is an incredibly selective startup accelerator — and applications for the winter 2021 batch are due on September 23 by 8 p.m. PDT. An impressive application can help you win a spot. Business Insider has highlighted below some examples of successful applications from Y Combinator alumni. Business Insider regularly interviews founders about their entrepreneurial journeys. You can read about them all by subscribing to BI Prime.  There's still time to apply to Y Combinator. Since the accelerator opened its doors in 2005, more than 2,500 startups have gone through the program. Many of those startups have since achieved tremendous success. Think Airbnb, Dropbox, Instacart, Coinbase, and Brex.  The admissions process at Y Combinator is very selective: About 1.5% of the companies that apply make it in. Once they do, those companies receive seed funding, plus advice from seasoned founders. The program culminates in a Demo Day, when founders get to pitch investors on their business. This summer, the accelerator is holding demo day online on August 24 and 25.  The deadline to participate in Y Combinator's winter 2021 batch is September 23. To convince the admissions committee that you deserve a spot in the program, you'll have to craft an impressive pitch. Business Insider has talked to several founders who have done just that — and we've shared the original applications that got them in. Below, we've listed those applications, which you can use as inspiration when you're writing your own. Goodly: Read the application form that got a company with $0 in the bank into the selective startup accelerator that launched Airbnb and Dropbox InEvent: The startup accelerator that launched Airbnb and Dropbox rejected 3 founders in 2015 — so they rewrote their application and tried again. Read the form that finally won them a spot last year. Simple Habit: Read the application form that got the 'Spotify for meditation' into the selective startup accelerator that launched Airbnb and Dropbox Prolific: Less than 2% of applicants get accepted to Y Combinator, the startup accelerator that launched Airbnb and Dropbox. Read the application that helped 2 scientists who bootstrapped their business get in. Are you a startup founder who's participated in Y Combinator and wants to share your story? Contact Business Insider correspondent Shana Lebowitz at [email protected] ALSO: A former Y Combinator partner says a founder's answer to this one question on the tech accelerator's application strongly predicts their startup success Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's what it's like to travel during the coronavirus outbreak
An upcoming Windows 10 update will change the way URLs are copied and shared - and you can trial the new feature now.
A much-improved webcam will make you a Zoom meeting boss, but the anti-glare nano-texture screen is an extra $500.
The standard TLX starts at $38,525 and the upcoming Type S will be priced above $50,000.
He is considering bans against more Chinese companies such as Alibaba
A red supergiant star known as Betelgeuse has intrigued scientists worldwide as it inexplicably began to dim noticeably in the sky. We mentioned recently that scientists believe they now know what caused the dimming. The theory is that material was ejected from the star’s surface and cooled in space, turning into dust that has blocked a significant portion of the … Continue reading
Apple has made roughly $360 million in revenue over the last three years from "Fortnite," the online game now fighting Apple over its App Store fees. Epic Games, the maker of "Fortnite," sued Apple on Thursday over its 30% commission on all in-app purchases through the App Store. Earlier this week, Apple removed "Fortnite" from the app store after Epic Games tried to skirt Apple's commission. Fortnite has been installed over 133 million times and seen $1.2 billion in spending worldwide on the App Store to date, according to analytics firm Sensor Tower. Roughly 30% of that revenue went to Apple. Meanwhile, Fortnite was downloaded 11 million times and generated $10 million in spending on the Google Play store since it first debuted there in April 2020. Epic Games is involved in a similar dispute with Google, which also charges 30% commissions. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Before Epic Games sued Apple over its App Store fees, it was a cash cow for the tech giant, bringing in $360 million in revenue for Apple through its "Fortnite" app alone. A brewing conflict between the Epic Games and Apple exploded into the public eye on Thursday, when Apple removed Epic Games' "Fortnite" from the App Store for attempting to skirt Apple's 30% commission on all in-app purchases. Epic Games responded by suing Apple, accusing it of anticompetitive behavior. "Apple's removal of Fortnite is yet another example of Apple flexing its enormous power in order to impose unreasonable restraints and unlawfully maintain its 100% monopoly over the iOS in-app Payment Processing Market," Epic said in its lawsuit.  Epic Games also sued Google several hours later on Thursday for its similar enforcement of commissions on the Google Play store. Data provided by app analytics firm Sensor Tower to Business Insider shines a light on just how much money Apple and Google were making from "Fortnite," which has hundreds of millions of players across the globe. "Fortnite" is free to download — which has contributed to its popularity — but encourages players to spend money on in-game purchases, which are subject to commissions from Apple or Google. Since its release in 2017, "Fortnite" has been installed 133.2 million times and seen $1.2 billion in spending worldwide on the App Store alone, according to Sensor Tower. In the last 30 days, it was installed 2.4 million times and generated $43.4 million in revenue on the App Store. Apple has taken a 30% commission on "Fortnite's" App Store revenue, representing $360 million total. Meanwhile, "Fortnite" was downloaded 11 million times and generated $10 million in spending on the Google Play store since it first debuted there in April 2020, according to Sensor Tower. Of those, 2 million installs and $3.3 million in spending came in the last 30 days. Google also imposes a 30% commission on app revenue, meaning Google made roughly $3 million from Fortnite. Representatives for Google, Apple, and Epic Games did not immediately respond to requests for comment.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why American sunscreens may not be protecting you as much as European sunscreens
The Duo finally has a price and ship date, but the spec sheet raises a lot of concerns.
Samsung has two expensive devices focused on productivity. They both excel at their own things, but should they merge them?
Photo by Sam Byford / The Verge If you’re shopping around for a deal this weekend, there are a few that we want to tell you about. As is usually the case, some of them have been happening for the past few days, but others are new ones that more recently popped up. Brydge is hosting a back-to-school sale on its wireless Bluetooth keyboards for iPad, which should be helpful whether you’re physically going back to class or just resuming where you left off from home. If you have an iPad Pro (2018 or the latest 2020 version) its Brydge Pro keyboards, pictured above, are up to $50 off, down to $100 for the 11-inch keyboard and $130 for the 12.9-inch model. My colleague Sam Byford reviewed a bunch of iPad keyboards and he thought this one provided the best laptop-like... Continue reading…
‘Do More with R’ offers quick video tips on useful things you can do in the R programming language. Now you can search these R tutorial videos by topics, tasks, and packages in the table below. (Click on the task to go straight to the video content—or in some cases, an article with a video). Most videos are shorter than 10 minutes. To read this article in full, please click here
'A secure dev lifecycle has a much higher ROI than letting the public do the bug detection work for you' Microsoft's bug bounty program has exploded in terms of scope and payouts.…
California's labor commissioner announced Wednesday that her office is suing Uber and Lyft, claiming the companies are stealing wages from drivers by "willfully misclassifying" them as contractors instead of employees. The suit alleges that Uber and Lyft have failed to pay drivers minimum wage, sick pay, unemployment, and other benefits guaranteed to employees under state law. AB-5, California's hotly debated gig economy law, created stricter requirements for companies seeking to designate workers as independent contractors. California's agency that oversees ride-hailing companies ruled that drivers are employees under the law, but the companies have refused to reclassify drivers, and the issue is now at the center of multiple lawsuits. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The heated legal battle between California and ride-hail giants Uber and Lyft ratcheted up another notch this week with the state's labor commissioner announcing that she plans to take the companies to court over their classification of drivers. Commissioner Lilia Garcia-Brower's office said in a press release Wednesday that it plans to file a lawsuit against the companies, arguing that they are "committing wage theft by willfully misclassifying drivers as independent contractors instead of employees." In a letter to Uber and Lyft drivers alerting them to the lawsuit, Garcia-Brower's office said that it's seeking to force the companies to reclassify drivers as employees and reimburse them for wages and other benefits that they would be entitled to as employees under state law. That list includes a wide variety of payments that Uber and Lyft have historically not paid to drivers, such as minimum wages based on time drivers spend using the app (not just driving passengers), overtime, sick pay, and business expenses. "The vast majority of California drivers want to work independently, and we've already made significant changes to our app to ensure that remains the case under state law," an Uber spokesperson told Business Insider, adding that the company hasn't been served with the lawsuit yet and therefore hasn't been able to review its specific claims. A Lyft spokesperson told Business Insider: "The state labor agency has botched thousands of claims. They know they don't have the ability to process these claims, so they sent them into a legal abyss, where they know it will take years to resolve them." California's landmark gig work law, AB-5, which went into effect this year, raised the bar companies must clear in order to consider workers as independent contractors, spurring a major battle between regulators and Uber and Lyft over whether drivers meet that bar. California's Public Utilities Commission, the agency responsible for overseeing ride-hail companies, dealt a significant blow to the companies earlier this year when it ruled in June that drivers are considered employees under AB-5. In May, a group of attorneys general from the state — in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego — also sued Uber and Lyft over the issue. Uber and Lyft have previously argued that AB-5 doesn't apply to them and have aggressively defended their classification of drivers by claiming that drivers prefer to work as contractors. Unlike their employee counterparts, contractors aren't guaranteed certain benefits like as healthcare and paid sick leave, and Uber and Lyft aren't bound by certain labor regulations around minimum wage payments or required pay payroll taxes for those workers, which feed into programs like unemployment insurance. Driver advocacy group Rideshare Drivers United, which has been rounding up driver wage theft accusations, claimed that Uber and Lyft owe more than $1.3 billion in payments to drivers in California. The debate over what wages and benefits gig economy companies should be on the hook for (versus workers or taxpayers) has intensified in recent months as more states and cities start cracking down on companies like Uber and Lyft. Massachusetts filed a similar lawsuit last month, while New York city imposed the country's first minimum wage for ride-hail drivers and Seattle has sought to do the same.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: The rise and fall of Donald Trump's $365 million airline
The Supes are back for another season of Amazon's not-so-family-friendly superhero show.
Hi! Welcome to the Insider Advertising daily for August 3. I'm Lauren Johnson, a senior advertising reporter at Business Insider. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. Send me feedback or tips at [email protected] Today: Advertisers return to Facebook, Netflix's new CMO Bozoma Saint John, and Microsoft reportedly eyes TikTok.   Advertisers not part of the boycott also cut back spending on Facebook in July, but the platform says it will be just fine July is over. So what was the upshot of the Facebook ad boycott? According to analytics firm Pathmatics, Facebook's top 1,000 advertisers spent far less on the platform in July compared to the same period a year ago, including some that didn't publicly join the boycott, reports Tanya Dua. But some boycotters like Hershey and North Face said they would resume spending on Facebook in August, and Facebook downplayed the boycott's impact. Read the full story here. How Netflix's new CMO Bozoma Saint John rose to become the biggest 'badass' in marketing Tanya Dua and Patrick Coffee profiled Netflix's incoming chief marketing officer Bozoma Saint John, who is known as a glamourous executive and uses her close ties to celebrities to work with brands like Pepsi and Apple. "There are some marketers that lead with logic and data, and there are other marketers that lead with instinct and culture; [Boz] sits far out on the instinct and culture side," said friend Jonathan Mildenhall, who is cofounder of consulting firm TwentyFirstCenturyBrand. Others warned that Saint John's growing personal brand could overshadow the companies she works at.  Read the full story here. Trump to reportedly order TikTok's owner ByteDance to sell its US operations On Friday, President Donald Trump reportedly planned to ask China's ByteDance to sell its US ownership of TikTok. It's unclear if Trump has power to order a foreign company to sell its ownership but the report comes on the heels of the Trump administration saying that it was considering banning TikTok because of the app's ties with China. ByteDance offered to 'divest' its stake in TikTok's US operations to avoid Trump ban. Fox Business Network reported that Microsoft is in talks to buy the stake. The New York Times also cited a person with knowledge of the talks between Microsoft and TikTok in a report. Read the full story here. More stories we're reading: Marvel insiders say they're skeptical of its recent pledge to improve diversity in its comics and company, after employing only 2 Black editorial staffers in the last 5 years (Business Insider) Disney Plus executive Agnes Chu is replacing Condé Nast Entertainment president Oren Katzeff, who made offensive jokes about women and people of color (Business Insider) Brands like Target and ASOS are doubling down on the pajama-inspired 'day gown' as Americans stuck home look to elevate their leisurewear (Business Insider) 'People were sick to their stomachs with his fake sincerity': Frustrated Amazon sellers slam Bezos for claiming his retail platform empowers small businesses (Business Insider) Peacock said it signed up 10 million users, but what marketers should watch for is time spent (Insider Intelligence) BuzzFeed starts selling products directly to consumers (Wall Street Journal) Pinterest surges on July sales lift as advertisers, users return (Bloomberg) Thanks for reading and see you tomorrow! You can reach me in the meantime at [email protected] and subscribe to this daily email here. — LaurenJoin the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
The FDA has published an advisory warning that a new Salmonella outbreak has resulted in nearly 400 cases across the United States. Though the agency says that it and the CDC are still investigating and that a final conclusion isn’t yet available, the issue may be linked to onions from Thomson International. As a result, the company has recalled many … Continue reading
Huawei has started teasing the launch of its MediaPad T8 Android tablet in India and is expected to launch within a few days.
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