Donny Stiteler

Donny Stiteler

Followers 57
Following 44
China
Samsung has been working hard to take the lead of the market for smartphone cameras. During the past years, the company has greatly expanded the ... The post Samsung is working on a 3D ToF Sensor dubbed ISOCELL Vizion appeared first on Gizchina.com.
7
UK
As humans, we take time for granted. We’re born into an innate understanding of the passage of events because it’s essential to our survival. But AI suffers from no such congenital condition. Robots do not understand the concept of time. State of the art AI systems only understand time as an implicit construct (we program it to output time relevant to a clock) or as an explicit representation of mathematics (we use the time it takes to perform certain calculations to instruct its understanding of the passage of events). But an AI has no way of understanding the concept of… This story continues at The Next Web
8
US
This plucky little sedan has plenty of power.
10
US
Lovecraft Country's Jonathan Majors has reportedly been added to the Ant-Man 3 cast as the iconic, time-traveling Marvel villain known as Kang the Conqueror.
5
US
The top finance stories for September 14, including the news on the plans to save JCPenney and salaries at Fidelity.
9
US
Graphics-chip maker Nvidia is reportedly nearing an agreement to acquire the semiconductor designer.
5
UK
... but humans still needed to fix the 'Hygiene Compartment' NASA has conjured imaginings of an orbital Roomba after boasting of a "sweep" of the ISS interior by an Astrobee robot as hardworking 'nauts keep the outpost up and running.…
5
US
Astra’s Rocket 3.1 leaves the pad | Astra The first orbital mission for rocket launch startup Astra ended without its Rocket 3.1 reaching orbit. The rocket successfully lifted off from the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Alaska at about 11:19PM ET Friday, but the company said its guidance system “introduced some slight oscillation into the flight,” which caused the rocket to drift from its planned trajectory. The flight safety system shut down the engines, and the rocket fell back to the ground. It wasn’t carrying any payloads. A spectator caught the launch on video, showing the rocket’s ascent. In the footage, the rocket’s engine shuts off mid-flight and a few moments later, you can see flames as the rocket hits the ground. pic.twitter.com/PGYv26ZqrF— Jennifer Culton... Continue reading…
3
UK
To date, reports show that over 15 billion user credentials sourced from more than 100,000 security breaches are now being distributed online.
5
UK
Creepy sunspots seen by astronomers at the GREGOR telescope in Europe reveal our parent star in unprecedented detail. The images also show just how creepy sunspots can look. Studying magnetic patterns on the Sun allows researchers to better understand its behavior. Severe solar storms can affect satellites and electronic systems here on Earth. “This was a very exciting, but also extremely challenging project. In only one year we completely redesigned the optics, mechanics, and electronics to achieve the best possible image quality.” said Dr. Lucia Kleint, who led the project. Solar granules shown in the images resemble popcorn. Hot plasma rising… This story continues at The Next Web
8
US
The new Xbox Series S is surprisingly small, both in terms of its $299 price and its dimensions. I’ve been playing around with a nonfunctional Xbox Series S this week, and I’m genuinely surprised Microsoft has managed to fit the same Xbox Series X CPU and lots of other next-gen technology into something that uses space and wealth so economically. The Xbox Series S is just 275mm (10.8 inches) tall, 151mm (5.9 inches) deep, and 63.5mm (2.5 inches) wide in a vertical position. Microsoft has placed rubber feet in both vertical and horizontal positions. And unlike the Series X, I think the Xbox Series S looks great in both orientations. This also allows the Series S to fit comfortably within most TV stands. ... Continue reading…
7
UK
Boris Johnson has been forced to tear up his plan to get Britain back to “normal” by Christmas and instead impose tough new Covid restrictions after a dramatic spike in the virus among the under-30s.The prime minister appeared alongside chief medical officer Chris Whitty and chief scientist Patrick Vallance for a live No.10 TV briefing after figures showed coronavirus infections among young people are now rising rapidly and are double the national average.Asked directly if Christmas was “cancelled” for many families that wanted to get together, Johnson said it “breaks my heart” but new curbs were needed.From Monday, a new “rule of six” will be introduced in law, with arrests and fines for the first time for those who gather in larger groups.A three-month review will take place in early December, but it is unlikely rules will be relaxed and they may be tightened further.Among a raft of measures are:New police powers to break up house parties of more than six people, with neighbours actively encouraged to inform on any rule breaches;Pubs and restaurants forced by law to keep registers of all customers, with 10pm curfews in areas of high Covid prevalence;Forcing airlines to require passengers to fill in locator forms before they flyMore Border Force police spot checks of people who arrive from abroad;A much more limited return of fans to Premier League football matches and other live stadium sport;An army of newly qualified and retired environmental health officers recruited to help councils police hospitality breaches.Two whole households will no longer able to meet if their numbers are greater than six.Only one support bubble will be allowed, so only one set of grandparents will be able to see their grandchildren.“It breaks my heart to insist on these restrictions upon individuals, families, grandparents,” he said.“This rule of six will of course throw up difficult cases, for example two whole households will no longer be able to meet if they would together exceed the limit of six people and I’m sorry about that, and I wish that we did not have to take this step.“But as your Prime Minister, I must do what is necessary to stop the spread of the virus and to save lives.”Johnson admitted the rules to date had become too “complicated” and it was time to simplify the public health messages and to legally enforce them.The new crackdown is in stark contrast to the tone struck by the PM in July, when he suggested there would be a “significant return to normality” by Christmas.Crucially, new curbs are expected to be in place until next spring but with a three-month review in early December, government insiders warned.Whitty said: “The period between now and spring is going to be difficult. You shouldn’t just see this as a very short term thing.”The PM said: “I’m still hopeful that in many ways we could be able to get some aspects of our lives back to normal by Christmas.” But he accepted that would not be possible without a “moonshot” plan to get mass, daily testing in place.The national Covid rate among all ages has in the past week risen from 12.5 to about 19.7 per 100,000 – just under the level at which the UK slaps quarantine curbs on other countries.But the detailed figures for young people are driving the rise, with the rate for 17- to 18-year-olds now at 48.1, for 19- to 21-year-olds 54.5, and 20- to 29-year-olds overall 41.6.The rise is not just down to extra testing, as the rate of people who test positive has trebled from 2.5% a couple of weeks ago to 6.1% among 17- to 18-year-olds, 5.1% among 19- to 21-year-olds and 3.5% among 20- to 29-year-olds.Regarding the six people rule, Johnson said: “This will apply in any setting, indoors or outdoors, at home or in the pub.“The ban will be set out in law and it will be enforced by the police – anyone breaking the rules risks being dispersed, fined and possibly arrested.“This single measure replaces both the existing ban on gatherings of more than 30 and the current guidance on allowing two households to meet indoors. Now you only need to remember the rule of six.”The PM revealed that he still wanted universities to go ahead with opening to students this autumn because they were crucial to “life chances” of young people.“My message to students is simple – please, for the sake of your education and your parents’ and your grandparents’ health: wash your hands, cover your face, make space, and don’t socially gather in groups of more than six, now and when term starts.”Related... Boris Johnson's New Excuse For Breaking The Law? He Negotiated His Brexit Deal Too Quickly The New Covid Rules Are So ‘Super Simple’ That 5 Key Things Remain Unexplained Keir Starmer Urges PM To 'Get A Deal' Done On Brexit
5
UK
There is no doubt that COVID-19 has changed the financial and SaaS landscape. This year is going to call for more judgment and effort to navigate the uncertainties brought on by the pandemic. Navigating these uncertainties often spell chaos and the transition to a “new normal” is likely to pose a challenge or two for finance leaders.  One of the questions that has been on most finance leader’s minds is ‘What do I need to do today to conserve cash?’  While there is no one-size-fits-all approach, there are definitely certain winning playbooks that SaaS businesses can learn from. From my… This story continues at The Next Web
7
UK
The Alienware Labor Day gaming sales are here, and you can save on everything from PCs to accessories right now.
9
US
The president attacks Jobs in a retweet noting that Jobs donated to rival Joe Biden's campaign and has majority stake in The Atlantic.
5
UK
SUSE chap wants Linux and classic AmigaOS to coexist peacefully The Amiga Fast File System (AFFS) is making a minor comeback in the new version of the Linux kernel.…
5
US
Top-tier smartphones from Apple and Samsung now support ultra-wideband (UWB) technology. But what is it and what can it do?
6
UK
Last week, I decided to not brush off the haters.
2
US
Amazon is keeping a watchful eye on workers, lest they try to become organized.
9
UK
You can do a lot of things these days without even tapping on your phone but there are still quite a lot that requires some good, old-fashioned manual work. That doesn’t always have to be the case, especially these days when people have to be extra careful what they put their hands on. Following up on a promise it made … Continue reading
7
US
You want more choices with your Wrangler? Jeep's got you covered.
10
UK
A device called the OnePlus Watch with an associated model number indicated as W301GB was recently certified by regulators from Singapore's IMDA.
9
China
It seems no one can stop Xiaomi from making new incredible products for the TV market. Just recently, it released the Xiaomi Mi TV OLED ... The post Xiaomi Mi TV To Get Two 82-inch Variants With 8K and 4K Resolutions appeared first on Gizchina.com.
US
The mask uses built-in fans to filter the air
US
This report focuses on connectivity as the foundation of Industry 4.0 and hones in on return on investment (ROI) and cost of inaction(COI) for Industry 4.0 implementation in factories and warehouses. It also helps to provide more depth on five specific use cases for manufacturing: mobile robots, condition-based monitoring, asset tracking, augmented reality, and provisioning […]
US
The tech giant adds a new feature to the web version of Microsoft Word allowing people to record and upload audio for transcription.
US
Ethical living startup CoGo hopes to raise more than £20 million ($26 million) from impact investment funds as part of an ongoing Series A round, CEO Ben Gleisner told Business Insider. The app, which uses open banking tech to nudge consumers to do things like lower their carbon footprint and spend on businesses that pay the living wage, has raised over £4 million ($5.2 million) since it was founded in 2016. It plans to use the funds to grow its user base from around 75,000 to half a million by March 2021, and to launch into new markets in North America, Australia, and Northern Europe.  Here's an exclusive look at the pitch deck it's used to bring new investors on board. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. London-based ethical living startup CoGo has closed more than £4 million ($5.2 million) in funding since it launched in 2016. Now, it is in the process of raising a Series A round, which it says will bring in upwards of £20 million ($26 million). The free CoGo app uses open banking technology to nudge consumers into make ethical spending decisions. Its two main features are a "living wage wallet," which tells users how much of their money is spent on businesses that pay the living wage, and a carbon footprint tracker. It also asks users what they value — for example, vegan, fair trade, or cruelty free products — and nudges them to spend on business that align with those values. Most of the £4 million ($5.2 million) the startup has raised so far have come from angel investors. CEO Ben Gleisner says that 75% of the most recent funding was reinvestment from existing investors. The ongoing Series A round will bring in new funding from impact investors, and will help CoGo to launch into new markets in North America, Australia, and Northern Europe.  Tech-for-good startups like CoGo have benefited from the surge in impact investing over recent years, says Gleisner. "There's this growth of funds that are looking for companies that can deliver financial return, as well as sort of social and environmental impact," he says. "While COVID was a bit of a shock ... there's a massive build-back-better narrative now." The CoGo app currently has around 75,000 users across the UK and New Zealand, and ambitious plans to grow. "We've got goals of half a million [users] by the end of the financial year," says Gleisner. "Ultimately, we want 100 million people within three years using our app." With a larger consumer base, CoGo will have an extensive dataset that it can use to sell insights to businesses, says Gleisner, adding that a revenue model based on advertising would undermine the startup's ethics-driven mission.  "[With 100 million users], you could definitely drive businesses to change what they do," he says. "The insights we think will be hugely important, like if you don't know the insights of the CoGo consumers then you're losing some really important valuable customer base." The startup also recently announced partnerships with Westpac New Zealand and one of the 'Big Four' banks in the UK, which it hopes will help to raise its profile and drive consumer growth.  Here's an exclusive look at the pitch deck it's used to bring new investors on board so far. CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo CoGo
US
Scout Campers' new Kenai also offers a toilet and optional shower, and it all fits on the back of your truck. Wild.
US
A new poll of 800 businesses found 94% embraced some aspect of a new approach to cybersecurity that constantly authenticates users.  But many also have run into funding challenges as they try to expand cybersecurity tools to protect remote workers.  This may provide a real opportunity and challenge for Microsoft, analysts believe.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Microsoft poll finds businesses embraces 'zero trust' security in pandemic, but must cut cybersecurity costs The pandemic has created a challenging situation for many companies, wherein they simultaneously need to beef up their cybersecurity practices to accomodate the shift to remote work while also keeping costs in check as an uncertain economy shrinks budgets.  Businesses have embraced "zero trust" cybersecurity and broadly adopted multi-factor authentication, according to findings from a recent Microsoft poll, but many are running into budget constraints as they look to go all-in on cloud-based security. Zero trust cybersecurity is so-named because it "trusts" no one in the company – not the CEO or head of IT – to stay signed into the system. Instead, users are continually authenticated with texts, pings, and biometrics like fingerprints. The approach has allowed companies to ensure that the users on its networks are indeed their employees – not someone who simply acquired log-in credentials. But zero trust also requires limiting all access to data to only those who need it at the moment, and constantly hunting for threats – and those are more expensive areas. The survey — which polled nearly 800 business leaders of companies of more than 500 employees in India, Germany, the United Kingdom, and the US — found that 94% of companies say they are in the process of deploying new zero trust capabilities to some extent. And while more than half of the business leaders (58%) reported budget increases for security and 65% for compliance, 81% also reported feeling pressure to lower overall security costs. That may play into Microsoft's approach of offering integrated cybersecurity, coworking, and cloud-computing solutions, since it can offer a cheaper combined cost than many companies could get from multiple vendors.  Microsoft has hired a new cybersecurity vice president who is also chief marketing officer for security, compliance and identity, reporting to the CEO and other top executives. Vasu Jakkal,  former chief marketing officer of FireEye, says Microsoft is doubling down on zero trust and looking to integrate cybersecurity solutions for companies on a budget. That is a big play with lots of potential, analysts say, but also may not be easy. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
UK
TLDR: The 2020 Learn Digital Marketing and Advertisement Certification Bundle guides first-timers through the world of online sales and how to be a success. While retail business was hurt at unprecedented levels in the wake of COVID-19, their loss turned into a big gain for digital retailers. In fact, eCommerce sales are expected to be up by 18 percent by the end of this year. And next year, global online sales could approach nearly $5 trillion.  That’s a roundabout way of saying that if you’re a retailer who isn’t focusing a decent portion of your time and effort into executing… This story continues at The Next Web
More

Top