Dorothy Chiaramonte

Dorothy Chiaramonte

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Following 40
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The deal gives Amazon a 16% stake in the food delivery company.
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NyanSat is an open source ground station that lets you listen in on low-orbit transmissions for about $100 worth of gear.
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This week will be a big one for Samsung and, considering everything we’ve heard and seen so far, it’s unclear whether its devices will sing to consumers or get the cold shoulder instead. Premium prices for these premium devices will certainly be the sticking points though Samsung will most likely throw in some freebies, deals, and promos to soften the … Continue reading
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos warned investors earlier this year that they might want to take a seat and prepare for a possible loss in Q2, as the company planned to spend $4 billion — all of its expected Q2 operating profit — on COVID 19-related expenses. Amazon projected a potential loss of $1.5 billion this quarter. But with the end of Q2 now behind us, Amazon shared its quarterly results, and they’re quite the opposite of gloomy. Despite the pandemic, Amazon doubled its net profit year over year to $5.2 billion, compared to $2.6 billion at this time in 2019. This impressive figure comes after the company spent over $4 billion on what Bezos describes as “incremental COVID-19 related costs in the quarter to help keep employees safe and... Continue reading…
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With Hollywood productions largely shut down, more filmmakers are making use of computer screens—something genre films have been doing for years.
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This is Sick Days, a collection of stories from readers on how the current covid-19 health crisis is changing the way they work.
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GM lost far less money than Wall Street expected for the coronavirus-devastated second quarter.  The carmaker said that vehicle sales in the quarter declined 34% compared with a year ago. North American operations achieved a "near breakeven," the company said in a statement. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. GM reported second-quarter earnings on Wednesday before the markets opened, and the automaker beat Wall Street analysts' expectations by a generous margin. The automaker lost $0.56 per share on a GAAP basis, and $0.50 per share on a non-GAAP basis. The bottom line was down 130%, compared to the same 2019 quarter. Revenue slid 53%, to $16.8 billion, as the coronavirus pandemic forced GM and the entire global auto industry to shut down manufacturing operations in Q2. Analysts had expected a loss of about $2 per share, on higher revenue. On the news, GM's stock price moved higher in pre-market trading, up almost 4% to $27. The company's North American business posted a less severe loss than international operations. "Clearly, the second quarter was a challenge, but we achieved near breakeven ...  in North America, despite losing 8 of 13 weeks of production," CFO Dhivya Suryadevara said in a statement. "These results illustrate the resiliency and earnings power of the business as we make the critical investments necessary for our future." GM ended the quarter with just over $30 billion in total liquidity, the company said, after expanding its credit facilities in the quarter. On a call with the media after results were announced, Suryadevara declined to provide guidance but indicated that GM expects $7-9 billion in cash generation in the second half of the year.      FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: This is what it’s like to drive around Havana in a 1955 Chevy Bel-Air
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This DIY project isn't as hard as you think, and you'll have a year-round patio for outdoor dining and movies. The post DIY advice: Should you build a raised patio on your own? appeared first on 21Oak.
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Get the latest on coronavirus.Sign up to the Daily Brief for news, explainers, how-tos, opinion and more. The UK has recorded seven more deaths of people who had tested positive for coronavirus in 24 hours – the first single digit total since March 13.The figures cover the period up to 5pm on Sunday, but the true number of deaths may be significantly different. Here’s a quick primer on what all the different numbers mean and how to understand them.It brings the total number of people who have died after a positive test in the UK to 45,759 as of 5pm on Sunday. That may, however, include people who have died of unrelated illnesses after recovering from Covid-19 as the government was forced to admit earlier this month – although not yet enough to balance out the underreporting in other areas. Here’s a quick primer on how to make sense of the multiple updates that are published each day.Separate figures published by the UK’s statistics agencies show there have been more than 56,100 deaths registered in the UK where Covid-19 was mentioned on the death certificate – likely to paint a truer picture, though several days out of date.The government also said in the 24-hour period up to 9am on Monday, there had been a further 685 lab-confirmed cases. Overall, a total of 300,111 cases have been confirmed.Globally, however, the picture is far grimmer. The number of cases of coronavirus around the world has doubled in the last six weeks alone, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Monday.Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the WHO, said the pandemic “continues to accelerate”.Almost 16m cases have been reported to WHO.In a separate development, the first case of Covid-19 in a UK pet was confirmed after a cat in England is believed to have caught the virus from its owners.The UK’s chief veterinary officer revealed on the government’s website that the infection was confirmed following tests at the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) laboratory in Weybridge on Wednesday.The cat and its owners have since made a full recovery and there was no transmission to other animals or people in the household. The symptoms detected in the cat were “nasal discharge and shortness of breath”.Although it represents the first confirmed case of an animal infection with the coronavirus strain in the UK, there is no evidence to suggest that the animal was involved in transmission of the disease to its owners, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said.Related... Families Of These Covid Victims Want You To Know Who They Were Cat Confirmed With Covid-19 Virus In First Pet Case In UK
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Intel's major production delay, which sent its shares plunging more than 16% on Thursday, underscored how its dominance in the chip industry is under threat. Intel is facing stronger challengers led by AMD, Nvidia and even Arm, the chip design maker which outperformed in the mobile market and has been gaining traction in the server market. "This was the worst we have seen in our career covering the company, and brings the structural issues we have been talking about for years directly to the forefront," Bernstein analyst Stacy Rasgon told clients in a note. Click here for more BI Prime stories. Intel's stock plummeted for a second day after the chipmaker said  production problems will delay its next generation processors. The tech giant's stunning announcement underscored the big changes in the semiconductor industry, where Intel's dominance is now seriously threatened by rivals led by AMD, Nvidia and Arm. Intel's stock plunged more than 15% in Friday trades after the company said a problem in its transition to a more advanced manufacturing process caused the delay. The news was stunning for a key reason: Intel had dominated the semiconductor industry over the past half century with its superior technology for both designing and manufacturing chips.  Now, the king of the chip industry seemed to be flailing, analysts said. "This was the worst we have seen in our career covering the company, and brings the structural issues we have been talking about for years directly to the forefront," Bernstein analyst Stacy Rasgon told clients in a note. The production issues, he added, "overshadow anything good they can put forth, while magnifying any negative events, all while they fight an existential conflict with themselves as they attempt to figure a way out of the hole they have dug." In fact, the production fumble overshadowed what had been a strong second quarter when Intel actually beat Wall Street's expectations. But analyst Chris Caso of Raymond Jaymes called the production delay a "bombshell" that suggests Intel is about to "give up what has been its main source of competitive advantage for 50 years." Intel losing its lead Intel said the problem was related to its 7 nanometer process, referring to the manufacturing technology based on the line-width on chips. Historically, Intel led the way in producing smaller and less expensive processors. In fact, it was known to be the master of Moore's Law — the chip industry trend named after Intel co-founder Gordon Moore, in which the number of transistors that companies are able to put on an integrated circuit has roughly doubled every two years.  The trend has allowed chip makers to make smaller, more powerful, and less expensive processors. But then Intel began to lose its lead. It wrestled with problems in transition to a 10 nanometer process. Rival AMD actually beat it in the transition to the 7 nanometer process. The Intel fumble is widely expected to give AMD a huge market share boost in PCs and server chips. AMD shares soared nearly 15% on Friday. With slow growth in the PC market, their rivalry has focused on server chips, especially the cloud giants, led by Amazon, Microsoft and Google, looking to build more data center capacity. AMD has managed to chip away at Intel's dominant position. This was underscored last year when Google announced that it would also use AMD's new server chip Epyc to power its data centers. That meant the AMD chip is now used by the three major cloud platforms. "Intel is still king, but AMD has been able to address an increasing portion of the overall market with competitive products," analyst Roger Kay of Endpoint Technologies Associates told Business Insider. Intel's rivals are circling Intel is facing serious challenges from other players. Arm, the chip design company owned by Softbank, outpaced Intel in the mobile chip market with a power-efficient architecture that became widely-used in cell phones and other mobile devices. Last month, Arm scored a big win when Apple announced that it will transition away from Intel chips for its Mac computers. Arm-based server chips have also started challenging Intel's dominant position in the data center market, which covers the massive cloud platforms of Amazon, Microsoft and Google. Softbank is reportedly considering taking Arm public or selling it, with Nvidia as a potential buyer. Nvidia, the graphics chips giant, has become another headache for Intel. The rise of AI, particularly so-called Deep Learning, led to a greater need for more powerful chips capable of more heavy-duty computing. Nvidia's graphics processors used for gaming and high-end graphics for blockbuster movies outshined Intel in a rapidly expanding market. Nvidia has also become a stronger player in the cloud and server market, and earlier this month, surpassed Intel as the biggest US chipmaker by market cap. 'Frankly, none of the numbers matter' In a call with analysts on Thursday, Intel touted what analysts agreed were robust second-quarter results. "Obviously this year has been an incredibly challenging year on multiple fronts," he added. But he also said that "competitively, we feel stronger as we exit 2020." Rasgon of Bernstein said the earnings report was overshadowed by what he considered Intel's longer-term problems. "Frankly, none of the numbers matter," he wrote. "While Intel suggested they at least know what the problem is, it certainly doesn't sound like a fix is forthcoming anytime soon given the magnitude of the delay." Got a tip about Intel or another tech company? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @benpimentel or send him a secure message through Signal at (510) 731-8429. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Claim your 20% discount on an annual subscription to BI Prime by clicking here. SEE ALSO: These 5 tech giants could buy VMware if Dell chooses to sell the software giant, according to analysts: 'VMware would be a valuable property to any company in enterprise' SEE ALSO: Here are the 6 top automation companies according to IT professionals, serving a hot market where giants like Microsoft and IBM are facing off with hot startups like UiPath and Automation Anywhere Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
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Team suggests grabbing it now The Xen project has popped out a new version, 4.14, of its widely used open-source hypervisor.…
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Staffing startups like Wonolo, Instawork, and Jitjatjo run apps that help temp workers find gigs at places that frequently need extra hands, like restaurants, warehouses, and hotels. Many of these startups are experiencing turbulent times as COVID-19 kills demand from their customers in industries that are affected by government shutdown orders, or by patrons' fears of  exposure to the virus. Wonolo CEO Yong Kim said business initially fell during the pandemic, but a boost in demand for essential businesses stabilized his company. These companies also struggle with a business model that requires sending temporary staffers from workplace to workplace while public health guidelines recommend minimizing contact with large numbers of other people. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Apps that match temp workers with short-staffed businesses like restaurants, hotels, and warehouses made up a burgeoning tech category before the coronavirus outbreak started erupting in the United States. Now, the startups that created those apps may be living or dying along with the businesses they serve. "Business has been tough," said Thor Wood, CEO of SnapShyft, which matches workers with open shifts at restaurants and hotels in the Midwest. Staffing startups serve a range of industries that rely on temp workers to fill shifts when business spikes past normal capacity, or permanent workers are out sick. Restaurants, hotels, and warehouses all use these platforms. Contract workers tap the staffing apps to pick up shifts washing dishes, laundering clothing, moving crates, or performing a host of other chores. For staffing startups that assist businesses affected by government closure orders to fight the pandemic, the downturn in demand has been devastating. "Business for us has dipped to the lowest of the lows," said Tim Chatfield, CEO of Jitjatjo, a New York City-based startup that services the metro area's vaunted dining scene.  "We were on a trajectory to rapidly scale geographically," Chatfield said. "We've pulled that all back at the moment." Now Chatfield runs Jitjatjo via video chats from a "command center" in his apartment's bedroom. His bed is hidden by a black curtain, and a custom purple neon sign hangs over his head, reading "#hirehospitality." He keeps a TV running nearby so he can stay on top of the headlines, as the future of his company rides on the latest news updates about the spread of the virus and local health regulations dictating whether his employees can work or not. "We're dealing with something that is really, really tough in that the knowledge around it is evolving on an hourly basis," Chatfield said. "And we've got people spread out across multiple markets, each with different rules." But as closure orders have demolished demand for temp workers from some businesses, demand from others has skyrocketed. Wonolo CEO Yong Kim said that although business started to get rocky in the early stages of the pandemic, the surge in demand from some of his client businesses brought Wonolo close to its pre-pandemic customer growth expectations. Wonolo has a more diversified clientele than some of its rivals. "Think about all the supply chain businesses that are in the supply chain, or logistics-related for consumers," Kim said. "Grocery stores that need stock, courier services that deliver goods, or ecommerce companies that provide online goods or services." Companies that dispatch temporary staffers must grapple with the fact that their core business activity can run contrary to current public health guidance on slowing the spread of coronavirus. Far from limiting contact, these startups send staffers from one workplace to another, exposing them to large numbers of people and various indoor environments. "There's lots of reasons food workers could be at high risk," said Peter Dooley, an industrial hygienist with the National Council for Occupational Safety and Health. "Restaurant work involves typically close, small spaces… also, restaurant and food work involves a lot of people-to-people contact. A lot of interactions with people, whether it be customers or coworkers or management or whoever." Startups have responded to these risks by furnishing workers with safety information. SnapShyft has sent CDC guidance and changes in local mandates through app alerts. Wonolo has created educational courses for its workers. And Jitjatjo, which actually employs its 10,000-strong workforce, is offering two weeks of paid sick leave for workers who catch the virus. "We've only been made aware of two cases of positive results [of COVID-19]," Jitjatjo's Chatfield said, "Which is phenomenal considering we employ over 10,000 people." Wood said he worries that even after business closure orders lift, workers will hesitate to continue using the apps out of fear for their own safety. "The workers might have PPE, but there's no guarantee that the guests do or that they're going to abide by the rules," Wood said. "I've seen it firsthand where you've got some businesses and some groups of people that are adhering to the mask rules and social distancing, and others that are on a different planet." Here are some of the leading startups in the staffing app industry: Pared San Francisco-based Pared was launched in 2015 and now operates in cities on both coasts and the midwest. Unlike many other apps in the same category, Pared focuses exclusively on finding shifts for food workers. Pared has been used by local restaurants and big names like Pizza Hut and McDonalds.  Instawork Instawork is often cast as a competitor to Pared. Both launched in San Francisco in 2015 and now operate in cities across the country. But unlike Pared, Instawork helps workers find shifts in industries outside of food-related work, including warehouse gigs and delivery jobs. SnapShyft Indianapolis-based SnapShyft was founded in 2016 and now provides shifts for food and event workers. The startup opened a second office in San Francisco last year to recruit top talent. Wonolo The Bay Area's Wonolo was founded in 2013, an early entry in the category. Wonolo helps businesses find temp workers for  a broad range of services, including warehouse work, food production, cleaning, and administrative positions. Wonolo claims high-profile corporate clients like Coca-Cola, Papa Johns, and fashion retailer Uniqlo. Jitjatjo New York City-based Jitjatjo was founded in 2016 and connects workers to shifts at the city's restaurants. Unlike many other startups in this category, Jitjatjo's more than 10,000 workers are employees of the company, not contractors. CEO Tim Chatfield said that business has been way down since the pandemic hit New York City. Jitjattjo has since pivoted to offering disinfection services. Shiftgig Chicago's Shiftgig was founded in 2012 and first focused on connecting local businesses to temp workers before transforming into a SaaS business that helps staffing agency employees find gigs. Shiftgig is used by national staffing agencies including LGC Hospitality and The Job Center. Qwick Qwick was founded in 2017 in Scottsdale, Arizona and has expanded to eight major cities across the country, including Phoenix, Dallas, San Diego, Atlanta, and New York City. Qwick is focused on finding shifts for food workers and event caterers. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why Pikes Peak is the most dangerous racetrack in America
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Switch on, urges GCHQ-backed public security agency Common cybersecurity threats also apply to Premier League football clubs, according to the National Cyber Security Centre, which said that one club nearly sent £1m to fraudsters after a business email compromise (BEC) attack.…
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A quick stop by the FCC revealed some interesting Oppo Watch specs, too.
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Samsung QLED TV deals are cutting prices on the Q60 range of premium displays this weekend.
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It may not have changed everything as promised, but the Segway was still far ahead of its time
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Amazon is starting to screen some warehouse employees for COVID-19 symptoms when they come into work, CNBC reported Thursday. The company told employees in at least two states, Michigan and Virginia, that it would be "introducing a symptom screen" and sending people home who show signs of the coronavirus, according to CNBC. Separately, Amazon said in May that it was launching a pilot program to test employees for COVID-19 as it ramps up safety measures in its warehouses. Still, employees continue to speak out about working conditions during the pandemic and accuse the company of failing to take adequate steps to protect them.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Some Amazon employees will soon undergo additional COVID-19 symptom screening before starting work, CNBC reported Thursday.  "Beginning this week we're introducing a symptom screen at our entrances in accordance with guidance from local authorities," Amazon told workers in at least Michigan and Virginia, according to CNBC. "Moving forward, when you arrive for your shift you will read signs listing potential Covid-19 symptoms as you enter the building." Employees who don't report symptoms during the screening will complete a temperature check and clock-in for their shift, while those who do could be sent home and instructed to get a COVID-19 test, CNBC reported. It's unclear how widely the new screening process is being rolled out or whether employees will be paid for additional time spent waiting (the US Supreme Court ruled in 2014 that Amazon is not required to pay workers for waiting in security lines). Separately, Amazon said in May that it is developing its own in-house coronavirus testing program, but would only say at the time that it has "started our first small-scale pilot." The company has been forced to drastically ramp up health and safety measures in its warehouses, where employees have been working throughout the pandemic. However, workers are continuing to speak out about working conditions and have accused Amazon of not taking sufficient precautions to reduce their risk of exposure to the virus. They have also criticized Amazon for not being transparent about outbreaks, which have been confirmed in dozens of warehouses. A crowdsourced document compiled by workers claims that there could be as many as 1,500 cases. Amazon has repeatedly refused to release case numbers. "The actual…total number of cases isn't particularly useful because it's relative to the size of the building and then the overall community infection rate," Amazon logistics chief Dave Clark told CBS News in May. However, Bloomberg reported last month that case rates at a Minnesota warehouse were at least four times the rates of surrounding communities. Amazon did not immediately respond to a request for comment on this story.SEE ALSO: Google's former CEO reportedly hosts a secretive summit in Yellowstone whose attendees have included Lady Gaga and Cory Booker Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
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Atomwaffen Division “preaches hatred of minorities, gays, and Jews.”
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Google and Reliance Jio announced today that they will collaborate on an entry-level Android device for India. This was the part of an announcement of the search giant investing $4.5 billion in the Indian company in exchange for a 7.7% stake. Reliance’s chairman, Mukesh Ambani, said that this phone will have 4G connectivity, and readiness for 5G connectivity whenever the technology becomes available in India. In a blog post, Google’s CEO,  Sundar Pichai, said that the smartphone will have optimizations to Android and Play Store for Indian customers: Google and Jio Platforms have entered into a commercial agreement to jointly develop an entry-level… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Android,Google
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Need to charge your phone fast? Oppo's newest phone-charging tech is for you
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Samsung Research has released the first tech details into 6G, coming 2028, along with 16K, XR... plus more tech news today!
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When it comes to discussing firearms and violence prevention in the United States, gun culture presents a big stumbling block — what will work in some places may not be effective in other regions, something largely due to how firearms are viewed differently depending on where you look. A new study has identified three specific ‘gun cultures’ in the US … Continue reading
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Honor's best phone to date improves on the vanilla Huawei P40, but is as tricky to recommend as it is to actually buy.
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Fair warning, this trailer gets quite sweary and quite gory, so be careful where you’re watching!
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Oyo has also changed its revenue model with hotel partners and implemented new hygiene measures to boost demand.
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What is net neutrality? If you’ve been paying even a little bit of attention to the news recently, you have probably heard the term net neutrality, and might even know that there is a big debate going on about it across the world, and especially in the United States of America. Net neutrality is the […] The post Is Net Neutrality a Good Thing? appeared first on Tech Reviews Weekly [Europe].
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You can find someone on Venmo if you need to send money, or send a payment request.It's easy to find someone on Venmo by searching for their name or username, or if you're in the same place, by scanning the unique QR code associated with their account.You can also sync your phone contacts and Facebook friends list on Venmo, making it easy to find anyone you have already added in those places.Luckily, there are several different ways you can look users up in order to transfer money to them or add them to your friends list, including a manual search function, QR codes, and contact list integration.Check out the products mentioned in this article:iPhone 11 (From $699.99 at Best Buy)
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Over the past two years, attacks like Spectre, Meltdown, and variants on those techniques—all capable of tricking a broad range of processors into coughing up sensitive data—have shown how hard it can be to secure a chip.But it's one thing for a company like Intel to scramble to fix a vulnerability, and a very different one when it fails to act on one of those flaws for more than a year.Today researchers at Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, KU Leuven in Belgium, the German Helmholtz Center for Information Security, and the Graz University of Technology in Austria revealed new versions of a hacking technique that takes advantage of a deep-seated vulnerability in Intel chips.Like the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities—which some of the same Graz researchers were involved in uncovering in early 2018—the new MDS variants represent flaws that could allow any hacker who manages to run code on a target computer to force its processor to leak sensitive data.The scenarios for that attack could include anything from a website's Javascript running in a victim's browser to a virtual machine running on a cloud server, which could then target a virtual machine on the same physical computer.But in this case, the researchers are pointing to a more serious failing on Intel's part than just another bug.
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It’s hard to choose a Windows UI framework.After all, there are so many of them.Do you build an application using the familiar WinForms, the more modern Windows Presentation Framework, or Windows 10’s Universal Windows Platform?Each has its benefits and drawbacks, with different sets of controls, design tooling, and supported versions of Windows.They support different design languages, with only Universal Windows Platform (UWP) controls offering support for the latest Fluent look and feel.Microsoft has been working to backport the new Windows 10 UWP controls to older frameworks, with tools like XAML Islands.
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