Evelyn Fowler

Evelyn Fowler

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Mondelez said the country’s short-term risk of further disruption remains significant due to the slow vaccine rollout and emergence of new variants
Sarah Ferguson has claimed she had her offer to help inform The Crown snubbed. The Duchess of York said she reached out to Andy Harries, an executive producer of Netflix’s hit royal drama, offering her input. “I said to him, ‘Why can’t I help my character?’ ” she told Town And Country magazine. However, the publication reports that her offer was declined. Sarah also joked about how she has barely been featured in The Crown’s four series so far, despite being married to Prince Andrew from 1986 to 1996. “Hello?” she joked. “Where is Fergie?”Fergie – portrayed by Jessica Aquilina – has only made a cameo appearance in series four in a scene centred on her wedding to Prince Andrew. Despite the snub from The Crown, it still seems like Fergie is a fan of the show, telling Us Weekly earlier this year: “I thought it was filmed beautifully. The cinematography was excellent.” The fifth season of The Crown is set to air in 2022 and will pick up years after the events of its predecessor, opening the door to a brand new cast.Imelda Staunton and Sir Jonathan Pryce will play Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, taking over from Olivia Colman and Tobias Menzies, while Elizabeth Debicki will succeed Emma Corrin as Princess Diana.Jonny Lee Miller is also set to portray former prime minister John Major.It’s been heavily rumoured that Dominic West will take over playing Prince Charles from Josh O’Connor, who recently won a Golden Globe for the role, while Lesley Manville will be portraying Princess Margaret.Meanwhile, reports previously suggested that Fleabag star Andrew Scott was being eyed for the role of Tony Blair.The Crown series one to four are streaming on Netflix now. READ MORE:Extraordinary Footage Of The Queen, Prince Charles And Princess Diana At Their Most Candid Is Doing The RoundsThe Crown Has Found Its John Major For Series 5, And Twitter Has A Lot Of Thoughts7 Stunning TV Locations You Can Easily Visit On A UK Holiday
With the arrival of the iPhone X, Apple has ditched the legendary “home” button of its iPhone series to achieve a better screen-to-body ratio. However, ... The post FaceID will come to the MacBook lineup in the coming years appeared first on Gizchina.com.
Shareholders approved Friday EV startup Lucid Motors’ merger with special purpose acquisition company Churchill Capital IV, after the companies extended the deadline by one day because not enough retail investors showed up to cast their vote. The issue is unusual but could become more common as more companies eschew the traditional IPO path to public […]
Amazon is currently offering an amazing deal on the Panasonic SoundSlayer Gaming Soundbar, which was specifically designed for Final Fantasy XIV Online.
MIT CSAIL spinout Inkbit this week announced that it has raised $30 million. The Series B, led by Phoenix Venture Partners LLC, brings the firm’s total funding up to $45 million. PVP joins existing partners like industrial 3D printing giant Stratasys, DSM Venturing, Ocado, 3M, IMA and Saint-Gobain. Inkbit was founded in 2017, building on […]
A biologist, a neuroscientist, and a musician found four distinct "modes" of transition
According to Desty, it already has hundreds of thousands of users on its platform in Indonesia.
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Fourteen institutions from six European countries are developing a new adaptive storage system for high-performance computing within the ADMIRE project. Their aim is to significantly improve the runtime of applications in fields such as weather forecasting, molecular dynamics, turbulence modeling, cartography, brain research, and software cataloging.
The ISS will soon be receiving an upgrade, with the largest module ever launched to the station set to be sent into orbit this week. Here's how to watch.
Vodafone Idea Ltd (VIL) bled with a 1.8 million decline in net subscribers as it lost customers in 19 of the 22 circles
In order to look into the demand for holding examination for clerical cadre in PSBs in local/regional languages, a Committee has been constituted to look into the matter in its entirety
Some business owners blame workers or government handouts for the labor shortage - others say the solution is simply to pay workers more.
American Dedicated Logistics managers are spending 60% of their time trying to poach drivers at malls and truck stops, to plug a staff shortage.
Image: Apple Apple announced Thursday that it will commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks with the release of a new documentary in September. 9/11: The President’s War Room, released in partnership with the BBC, will focus on the 12 hours that followed immediately after the first plane hit the World Trade Center. The new film is directed by Adam Wishart, a British director known for the Channel 4 documentary about Somali warlords living in the suburbs, Warlords Next Door? While an immediately less intriguing premise than suburban warlords, 9/11: The President’s War Room does sound like it might have gotten more access than previous retellings of 9/11. Apple claims the documentary features never-before-seen testimony from key parties... Continue reading…
Nordstrom's Anniversary Sale starts on July 28, but you can already get a preview of what's on sale. Here are the best deals on women's fashion.
Hello and welcome back to Equity, TechCrunch’s venture capital-focused podcast, where we unpack the numbers behind the headlines. For this week’s deep dive, Alex and Natasha and Danny decided that it was time to talk about drugs. No, not like drugs for fun, but instead drugs that you might have considered fun, but are now being redirected to help […]
Over the last few months, there have been multiple reports regarding Xiaomi’s MIUI system. Most of the complaints revolve around the display, camera, and battery. ... The post MIUI dark mode issues – Xiaomi promises special optimization appeared first on Gizchina.com.
E-commerce in Europe is expected to grow 30% this year to $465 billion, and that’s giving rise to a new ecosystem of services built to cater to e-commerce merchants. In the latest development, Juni, a neobank that is built specifically for companies selling online, has closed a Series A of $21.5 million, only 12 weeks […]
“Just the use of the words ‘Freedom Day’ upsets me,” says Natasha Coates, a 26-year-old from Nottinghamshire, who shielded for 14 months earlier in the pandemic. “What freedom is there for people like me? If cases continue to rise I will have go back into shielding, so if anything I am loosing freedom, not gaining it.”Coates has autism and mast cell activation syndrome (MCAS), which causes regular symptoms of anaphylaxis. She was “terrified” by the announcements made during Boris Johnson’s press conference on Monday evening, in which he set out plans for the country’s grand unlocking in a fortnight’s time. The prime minister confirmed that he intends to lift social distancing and face mask laws in England on July 19. The instruction to work from home where possible will also be scrapped, as will the “rule of six” inside private homes. Night clubs will reopen and large-scale events will not legally require certification. Staying Covid cautious will be left to personal discretion. The message is clear: it’s time to get back to normal. But that’s impossible for many of the 14.1 million disabled people in the UK. People with certain medical conditions can not have the coronavirus vaccine and there’s emerging evidence that the vaccines may not work as well for people with suppressed immune systems. It’s also worth remembering that no vaccine is 100% effective, and it is possible to become infected even after vaccination. This is particularly concerning for the nation’s disabled community, who are among those hardest hit by the pandemic. Data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) shows six in 10 of all those who’ve died from Covid were disabled people.“I am scared,” says Coates. “I don’t want to become part of that statistic.”Brogan Taylor, 28, from Northumberland, is also dreading the lifting of restrictions and says it’ll mean she’ll be forced to limit time outside once more. Taylor only returned to the supermarket in May for the first time since March 2020 and has been enjoying a slice or “normality”. But, she says, she won’t feel safe to do that once face masks are no longer mandatory. “It feels like the Hunger Games and we just have to endure it,” says Taylor, who is immunocompromised. “The clinically extremely vulnerable have been forgotten (again) which hurts, considering we spent our 2020 not leaving our front doors and now it’s like ‘good luck to you’.“There’s a large group of immunocompromised people like me for whom the vaccine isn’t as effective and no one seems to be taking action or considering us. I feel disposable.”Politicians have said the end of lockdown restrictions will almost certainly lead to cases rising, but on Tuesday, the new health secretary Sajid Javid told BBC Breakfast the country will be entering “uncharted territory,” admitting nobody really knows how bad things will get. One estimate is 100,000 cases a day. The uncertainty is anxiety-inducing for many, including 33-year-old disability campaigner Shani Dhanda, who has a rare genetic condition which means she has a low immune system and a reduced lung capacity.“Now the world is opening without restrictions, I feel like I don’t know how or where I’ll be able to go safely,” she says. “I feel that the end of restrictions is freedom for the majority, but not people who are clinically vulnerable.”Journalist and disability activist Rachel Charlton-Dailey shares her concerns. “I’ve spent the last year and a bit fighting for my own safety and that of other disabled people, while many just flout the rules or treat it like they’re being persecuted for being asked to care about others,” the 32-year-old, from South Tyneside, says.“I’m scared that more disabled people are going to die, and if not we’re all going to be too scared to leave our homes. And nobody cares. As long as they can go to the pub.”Dr Hannah Barham-Brown, a 33-year-old Leeds-based GP trainee, has “some increased anxiety” about July 19, but she’s double jabbed and not immunosuppressed.“I’m very worried about the welfare of my disabled friends who aren’t so fortunate,” she says. “As a doctor, I’m very worried about the rising numbers of cases on top of having to catch up with a lot of cases that we haven’t been able to manage during Covid - people may not be getting so sick, but the NHS (and particularly General Practice where I work) is under incredible pressure, and staff are exhausted.”Those who were originally identified as extremely clinically vulnerable to coronavirus have now been offered two vaccines, but this does not apply to all disabled people. Selina Kaurtee, who’s a brand ambassador for Models of Diversity, has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, which is a connective tissue disorder with related heart problems. However, she wasn’t classified as “vulnerable” so has only recently had her first vaccine. The 29-year-old, from London, thinks the “freedom day” rhetoric is insensitive to disabled people, whether they’re clinically vulnerable or not. “Lockdown, as the British public experienced, is just every day life for many of those with disabilities,” she says. “One positive is that people have been more understanding of those with disabilities during the pandemic. They’ve understood what it’s like not being able to leave the house, having to plan every last detail before you can do something, companies have allowed people to work from home and it’s shown people don’t necessarily need to be in an office environment to get their job done, but my worry is that once people have experienced their ‘freedom,’ they’ll forget all of these things and nothing will change for the disabled community.”Victoria Jenkins, founder of the adaptive clothing line Unhidden, agrees, and is also worried about receiving negative reactions from others if she continues to wear a mask or cancels plans in busy, indoor settings. “As has been the case throughout the pandemic, people with disabilities and the elderly are being forgotten and left behind – we are once again considered acceptable collateral damage to opening the economy,” the 35-year-old Londoner says. “I completely understand everyones’ eagerness to return to some semblance of normal life, but when it comes at the expense of others – or as seems more the case so that money can be made – overall it is leaving me feeling that the general public and corporations have not changed in their attitude to this group when it had felt like progress was being made.” Some are tentatively looking forward to restrictions relaxing. Kam Kaur, 37, from Birmingham, thinks returning to the office once or twice a week will boost her wellbeing, and she’s looking forward to spending time with her family indoors more easily.“One coping mechanism I’ve been applying is to not force myself into accepting every invite,” she says. “I know it’s okay to take time to readjust.” But for many individuals we spoke to – and two leading disability charities – it’s hard to look at the bright side, when a whole community of people were ignored in Monday’s press conference. “Disabled people have been forgotten throughout the pandemic,” says Jessica Leigh, campaigns manager at disability equality charity Scope. “The government’s decision to lift restrictions leaves some clinically extremely vulnerable people or those not yet vaccinated at the mercy of others’ goodwill. It does little to reassure disabled people that their needs, and the sacrifices they’ve made, are being considered by government in these plans.“There’s been no mention of people who are high risk because they either cannot have the vaccine, or who have conditions where the vaccine won’t be as effective such as those who are immunocompromised. Many disabled people will be worried that plans to remove all restrictions are gambling with their lives.”There needs to be more clarity around the support that disabled people will be offered as England unlocks, adds Phillip Anderson, head of policy at the MS Society. “The prime minister has failed to make clear how those most at risk will be supported to stay safe,” he says. “It is imperative the government ensures vulnerable people are not pressured to stop working from home, as well as ensuring they can get food and medical care without facing crowded shops or hospitals unnecessarily.“Clinically extremely vulnerable people should also be able to view the most up-to-date assessment of risks to give them much-needed reassurance that this next phase will be safe for them.”HuffPost UK has contacted the Department of Health and Social Care for a response to the concerns raised in this article and will update this article when we receive one. For people like Natasha Coates, there’s still one unanswered question: would it really be so hard to keep some of the lockdown restrictions? “I appreciate that wearing a mask may be uncomfortable, but I can assure you it’s not as uncomfortable as the thousands of people mourning the death of a loved one that was preventable,” she says. “As a disabled person, I don’t feel like the government cares about us at all.” READ MORE:Is It Safe To Lift Lockdown When Covid Cases Are Up?Scientists Agree, We Should Not Ditch Face Masks On July 19'I'm Not Here For The Warm and Fuzzies': The UK Stars Of Disability TikTokYou're Finally Vaccinated, But Don't Forget These 5 PrecautionsThis 'Pyjama-Free' Adaptive Fashion Line Has Designer AmbitionKind Strangers Unite To Track Down Discontinued Toy For Disabled Teen
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