James Farr

James Farr

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Mayer took up the position merely three months ago
Six more police officers are being investigated for misconduct in relation to non-official and inappropriate photographs of two sisters who had been stabbed to death in a London park.Two officers, who have not been named, were detained on June 22 on suspicion of misconduct in public office. They were released under investigation and suspended from duty, and an investigation was launched by the Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC).This has now been completed and the IOPC has sent a report to the Met, which the Directorate of Professional Standards is now reviewing. Advice will also be sought from the Crown Prosecution Service.On Tuesday, the Met announced that during the investigation further possible misconduct matters came to light, and the IOPC have advised six additional officers that they are under investigation for misconduct in relation to the inappropriate and non-official photographs.In addition, possible misconduct unrelated to the Wembley incident, and involving a small number of officers, has been identified by the IOPC. It relates to honesty and integrity, and equality and diversity.None of these officers have been suspended.IOPC director for London Sal Naseem said he was “deeply concerned” by the investigation’s findings.Danyal Hussein, 18, of Guy Barnett Grove in south-east London, was charged with the murder of Nicole Smallman, 27, and Bibaa Henry, 46, on 2 July. He was also charged with possession of an offensive weapon. The family of the victims have spoken of the “devastating impact” of their loss after their bodies were found next to each other on June 7 at Fryent Country Park in Wembley, north-west London.Scotland Yard said its directorate of professional standards was informed of allegations that “non-official and inappropriate photographs” had been taken at the crime scene, it emerged at the end of June.The IOPC said the pictures were allegedly “shared with a small number of others”, adding that the Met was “handling matters involving those members of the public who may have received those images”. In a statement on Tuesday, Naseem said: “I am deeply concerned by the issues emerging from our investigation.“Policing is founded on community consent, confidence and cooperation. The public have a right to expect high standards of professional behaviour from police. These allegations, if true, breach that trust and may point to more serious issues around the organisational culture, which we will also be looking at.“The evidence we have seen provides a salient reminder to all police officers to take responsibility for addressing wrongdoing and upholding professional standards in their own ranks, and their obligation to speak out if they see unacceptable behaviour.”Speaking in June, Met commander Paul Brogden said: “I am horrified and disgusted by the nature of these allegations; a sentiment which will be shared by colleagues throughout the organisation.“If true, these actions are morally reprehensible, and anyone involved will be robustly dealt with.“This deeply disturbing information will no doubt have created additional trauma for a family who are already grieving the devastating loss of two loved ones.“I can only start to imagine the impact of this; and I’d like to sincerely apologise to them for this further burden.“I know that the wider community will share our shock and repulsion at these allegations and whilst our focus remains with Bibaa and Nicole’s family we are also listening to the concerns our communities and key stakeholders will want to raise about these allegations.”Related... Teenager Charged With Murder Of Sisters Bibaa Henry And Nicole Smallman Sisters Found Dead In London Park After Birthday Party Were Stabbed, Police Say
Desperately seeks a dirty dozen of DevOps suppliers With £800m of other people's money in hand, UK central government is on the hunt for DevOps folk to build and manage live NHS services and oversee data system migration under the "Digital Capability for Health" scheme.…
(University of Pittsburgh) Hepatocytes -- the chief functional cells of the liver - are natural regenerators, and the lymph nodes serve as a nurturing place where they can multiply. Researchers demonstrated that large animals with ailing livers can grow a new organ in their lymph nodes from their own hepatocytes.
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I’ve been trying to avoid writing about the Epic-Apple quarrel. While it serves to help consolidate App Store critics, it’s not the dramatic fight Epic seems to believe.It’s about money and control In my experience, when wealthy people talk about “freedom,” it doesn’t usually mean freedom for the rest of us, just freedom for them. This whole affair can easily be characterized as being little more than a company of millionaires fighting a company of billionaires over the right to take a cut from software sales.I haven't completely waded through the verbosity of Epic’s complaint, but I think it’s fair to say the main thrust is that it wants to sell games to iOS users at its own store and doesn’t want to pay Apple 30% to do so. That’s a little inconsistent, as the only games store that doesn’t take 30% on sales is Epic’s. All the other games stores take exactly the same as Apple.To read this article in full, please click here
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Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi slammed labor groups that oppose the company's stance on drivers' employment status, accusing them of being motivated by "politics." During a call with investors Thursday, Khosrowshahi said groups on Uber's side of the issue, conversely, "actually are taking into account the wants and needs of drivers." Uber and other gig economy companies are engaged in a massive legal and political battle, most notably in California, over whether their drivers are employees or independent contractors. The state's regulators have ruled that drivers are employees under its gig worker law and have taken Uber and Lyft to court over the issue, while the companies have pumped $30 million each into a ballot measure that would exempt them from the law. The stakes are high — analysts said last year that an adverse ruling on the issue could bankrupt Uber and Lyft. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi took a shot at labor and driver advocacy groups on Thursday over their stance on drivers' employment status, accusing them of not representing drivers' interests. During Uber's quarterly earnings call, Khosrowshahi said groups opposing Proposition 22 — the company's ballot measure in California that would permanently make drivers independent contractors — are motivated by "politics." "We've got terrific supporters [of Proposition 22] in the community as well who actually care about drivers, versus labor unions and politics, they actually are taking into account the wants and needs of drivers," he said. Labor and driver groups pushed back on Khosrowshahi's comments. "It is the height of hypocrisy for Uber's rich executives to feign that they care about drivers when they are spending hundreds of millions on a ballot proposition to prevent those workers from receiving the wages, healthcare, and fundamental rights that they have been granted under California law," Transport Workers Union president John Samuelsen told Business Insider. Carlos Ramos, a driver and organizer for Gig Workers Rising, said: "From my years of organizing with fellow drivers I can unequivocally say that Dara's words do not reflect Uber's actions. They never have. Uber has always attempted to deceive drivers around new policies and procedures, claiming that changes were made in the best interest of drivers."  In California, Uber, Lyft, and other ride-hail and food delivery companies are in the middle of a heated battle over whether drivers are employees or contractors under the state's gig worker law, AB-5, which went into effect this year and raised the bar companies must clear in order to treat workers as contractors. While the lawmakers behind AB-5 argued it made Uber drivers employees, the companies have refused to reclassify drivers, sparking multiple legal and political battles over the issue. In June, the state agency responsible for regulating Uber and Lyft ruled that ride-hail drivers are considered employees under AB-5, and a month earlier, a group of attorneys general from the state, Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego sued both companies over their alleged refusal to comply with the law. On Wednesday, Uber and Lyft got hit with another lawsuit from the state's labor commissioner, who accused them of wage theft by refusing to pay drivers minimum wage, sick pay, unemployment, and other benefits guaranteed to employees under California law. Unlike employees, contractors aren't guaranteed those same benefits, and companies aren't bound by certain labor regulations around minimum wage payments or subject to payroll taxes for those workers, which feed into programs like unemployment insurance. But Uber is hoping that Proposition 22, which it introduced last fall along with Lyft, DoorDash, Postmates, and Instacart, will pass in November, allowing drivers to remain classified as contractors and making its legal battles a moot point. The companies have pumped more than $110 million into a group supporting the initiative, with Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash contributing $30 million each. Khosrowshahi called Proposition 22, which also includes new benefits for drivers such as higher wages and some reimbursement for health insurance and vehicle-related expenses, "the best of both worlds." But driver groups have slammed the companies' proposal, saying it shortchanges drivers by not fully accounting for the actual work they do and the costs they incur. For example, under Proposition 22, drivers would not be paid for the time they spend waiting to get matched with a rider, and they would be reimbursed only $0.30 per mile (the IRS per-mile rate for business-related travel is 57.5 cents, by comparison). Both Uber and driver groups claim that drivers are on their side with regards to the initiative. Khosrowshahi said the "vast majority of drivers" support it, while Ramos said "tens of thousands of drivers are organizing against" it. The stakes are undoubtedly high for both drivers and the companies. When AB-5 passed last year, analysts at Barclays concluded that having to reclassify drivers as employees in California alone could cost Uber and Lyft an additional $3,63 per driver. "We think an adverse ruling on the contract workforce issue would potentially bankrupt both Uber and Lyft," they concluded.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: July 15 is Tax Day — here's what it's like to do your own taxes for the very first time
This is Sick Days, a collection of stories from readers on how the current covid-19 health crisis is changing the way they work.
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