Jeanette Perea

Jeanette Perea

Followers 61
Following 38
Critics of lidar, Tesla’s Elon Musk being, perhaps, the loudest among them, focus on the cost that the laser-based system adds to a self-driving vehicle.The spinning, rooftop lidar produced by industry leader Velodyne runs about $75,000.“It’s like having a whole bunch of expensive appendices.Like, one appendix is bad, well now you have a whole bunch of them.”The vast majority of self-driving developers, however, consider the laser sensor not vestigial but a crucial element of a safe, capable system.That’s why many of those outfits have developed their own systems (like Waymo) or acquired lidar makers (like Cruise, Aurora, and Argo).
In the 30 years since Tim Berners Lee first documented his vision for what would become the World Wide Web, the US has been the primary leader in innovative infrastructure and products that are now core to everyday life.The grievances span far and wide, from toxic and homogenous workplaces to extensive user tracking, massive data breaches, and an inability to combat platform abuse from bad actors and hostile nations.The global response has been a push for regulation, which will fundamentally change how businesses operate and innovate.The borderless nature of tech regulation puts immense power in the hands of the EU, which has emerged as the de-facto global enforcer of internet rights.Silicon Valley Frontierism will be forced to adopt some of what Emmanuel Macron calls “l’Europe qui protège,” or “The Europe that protects.” If the US can’t adjust to playing by someone else’s rules, it risks losing its foothold at the top of the tech food chain.In the early days of the internet, and in the wake of Enron, Tyco, and WorldCom financial scandals that shook public trust, US regulators passed the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) Act of 2002.
On July 1, 14 Russian sailors—most of them senior officers with ranks equivalent to captain, commander, or lieutenant commander in the US Navy—died in an accident aboard a small nuclear-powered submarine designed for operations near or on the sea floor.The submarine Losharik (named after a Russian children's book character who is a horse made of juggling balls) was operating in the Barents Sea when the accident took place.In a statement delivered on July 3 from the Russian North Fleet's base in Severomorsk, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu said that three crew members and a civilian aboard the sub survived the disaster.The accident is a public reminder of Russia's very secretive operations in the Arctic, which Putin's government has aggressively moved to protect militarily and exploit economically as the Arctic ice has retreated.Losharik has played a role in Russia's efforts to counter US submarines' covert incursions into their northern back yards.While the US Navy's "special purpose" submarine USS Jimmy Carter uses remotely operated vehicles to perform tasks at great depths, the Losharik is the product of a Soviet design effort focused on putting skilled people very close to the work.
When we last checked in on the Pixel 4, Google itself was leaking the device by posting renders of the back design to Twitter.Today, we're getting a better look at the front of the Pixel 4 XL thanks to a new set of renders from OnLeaks and Pricebaba.This year, according to the render, it looks like Google is going back to a traditional top bezel.Pixel 3 XL review—Google software deserves better than this hardwareDespite the extra space reserved at the top of the phone for components, this render doesn't show any additional hardware compared to the Pixel 3.There are still two front cameras, an earpiece, and two front sensors, which are typically a proximity sensor and an auto-brightness sensor.
While we are in the midst of one of the most exciting times in telecommunications history — driven by things like 5G, Wi-Fi 6, virtualization, and transformation of networks – it’s easy to focus on what the future might bring, as opposed to what operator networks are already capable of doing today.The reality is that mobile carriers don’t have to wait for the future to arrive because they are already sitting on top of a veritable goldmine.Today’s core networks are made of expensive, heavy-duty equipment optimized for transporting this data.For this to happen, operators need to disrupt the existing model and apply machine-learning algorithms to the real-time data which is flowing through their networks today.That would allow them to decode complex event combinations, traffic patterns and smartphone interactions to infer the tribes and behaviors that define each individual customer.These data sources can include static or near real-time information about customers.
Canon’s full-frame EOS R system may be less than a year old, but we’ve already gotten a good glimpse at the breadth it will cover.The EOS R launched in 2018 as a mid-upper tier model, followed shortly after by the entry-level EOS RP — the cheapest new full-frame camera ever made.5,655-point Dual Pixel autofocus, eye-detection AF4,779-point Dual Pixel autofocus down to -5 EVNone (available in some lenses)None (available in some lenses)
Being an island of limited space and with a long history of dead people means we're running out of space to put everyone when they die, resulting in full graveyards the land over.One solution to this could be creating new, modern burial sites on public land and beside roads, perhaps putting grandad to rest beside his favourite stretch of the A303.This is the thinking of the Faculty of Public Health, which is suggesting we plant a few trees in the default grey texture holes left where factories used to be and rebrand these places as fancy new green burial sites; as this would also tip a small black hat to the need to plant more trees in the hope they decarbonise the atmosphere a bit.Simply bunging someone in a hole where cars and Grifters used to be made and planting a conker tree on top of them is simultaneously better for the environment and would help our local councils meet their green space commitments, with the FPH's John Ashton explaining: "You have got 500,000 to 600,000 deaths a year in England and Wales so if everybody who died had a green burial – I am not saying that is going to happen – but if everybody did we could be planting half a million trees a year."It has to be more popular than emerging trends like dissolving and chemical flushing and composting, with even Ashton saying he'd probably refuse a form of human composting when his day comes.
Right now, there are more than 700,000 active podcasts and more than 29 million podcast episodes, as illustrated by Music Oomph.And although there seems to be a podcast for everyone, nearly all of the networks that host, develop, and promote shows are managed by men — including popular shows like Gimlet, Crooked Media, and Earwolf.Almost half of podcast listeners are women, yet just 22 percent of the shows they listen to are hosted or co-hosted by women.This is why Amanda Lund and Maria Blasucci, two actors and writers, along with their former agentPriyanka Mattoo, launched Earios.After raising $26,000 on Kickstarter last year, Earios launched its first three shows this week — including Filling the Void, in which host Lesley Arfin dives into hobbies and passions and interviews guests on what makes them happy.Foxy Browns concerns beauty and wellness for women of color and immigrants, hosted by Priyanka Mattoo and writer Camilla Blackett.
Superhuman, the buzzy and currently invite-only email startup that you might have come across even if you yourself don’t have access if you’ve ever encountered a “Sent via Superhuman” email signature, is making some changes based on community feedback.These include removing location logging altogether, getting rid of all existing location data, and turning read receipts off by default, and making them an opt-in feature for users.The email app’s default email tracking behavior (embedding the commonly used advertising tool of a ‘pixel’ in emails to report back to senders info like whether an email’s been opened or not) raised a number of concerns, centered around this blog post by former Twitter design executive Mike Davidson.Davidson’s post generated a lot of community response, and now Superhuman founder Rahul Vohra has issued a response to that response, including a list of actions that his company is taking to address concerns.Specifically, Superhuman’s product changes are focused around mitigating the potential for abuse of sharing location data – which could be very dangerous in the hands of a sender with ill intent for their recipient.These include immediately stopping any location logging for any emails sent by the service, and also rolling out new version fo the app that don’t show location data in the interface.
Apple has been firmly focused on photography since the introduction of the first iPhone in 2007, and this devotion comes into its own with the on-device computer vision AI it brings in iOS 13Apple has developed powerful image intelligence features in its devices, creating tools iOS users and developers can make use of to get things done.When it ships, iOS 13 will bring sophisticated AI to imaging, such as:The Photos app can curate your image library to highlight and organize the best images – it cuts out clutter, screenshots, duplicates and tries to put visually pleasing collections together.Portrait Lighting adjustments can be made inside the Camera app while taking a picture.It introduced Core ML 3 at WWDC, which gives developers – including enterprise developers -- new imaging tools for use in their apps.
An influential group of attorneys called the Uniform Law Commission (ULC) will meet in Anchorage in July to debate and vote on model state legislation concerning drones.Thankfully, the ULC has made a great deal of progress since it first considered a one-sided, unworkable, 200-foot “line in the sky” approach last year.The current ULC proposal appropriately balances the rights of property owners with the needs of drone operators to access airspace.The ULC’s proposal recognizes the same capabilities that make drones transformative for search and rescue, inspection and logistics, can – when misused – challenge the quiet enjoyment of property.If enacted by a state, the law would allow judges to weigh how many times and for how long the drone flew over the property, how low it was flying, why it was flying over the property, whether anyone saw the drone, and the time of day during which the flight occurred, when determining whether a drone has caused “substantial interference” with a property owner’s use and enjoyment of their land.By giving courts the power to weigh each case on its own merits, the “Tort Law Relating to Drones Act” will allow drone flights for commercial purposes – such as package or medical supply delivery – to continue without fear of frivolous lawsuits or a complicated and conflicting patchwork of airspace restrictions.
A few days after returning the vehicle to the rental company, a survey popped up in my inbox.While the first question was straightforward -- they asked me to rate my experience on a scale of one to 10 -- I didn’t expect the survey to be so long and clunky.It was clinical, robotic and hilariously formal -- very different from my experience talking to the company’s warm and friendly front-line staff.While my experience with this car-rental company was very good, the subpar survey made a terrible last impression.My experience exposes one of the main reasons market research is facing a crisis.In a recent study by the Global Research Business Initiative, only 26 percent of people said they trust the market research industry, with long surveys and poor mobile design singled out as contributing to the sagging reputation of an industry that scored below the banking, retail and ecommerce sectors
Welcome to TNW Basics, a collection of tips, guides, and advice on how to easily get the most out of your gadgets, apps, and other stuff.Losing your phone always sucks, but in 2019, it’s easier than ever to make sure the loss isn’t permanent.For Android users, it’s particularly easy.While some Android manufacturers include their own phone recovery services, Google builds a ‘Find My Device’ feature onto every Android phone or tablet – not just Pixels.Since Google also happens to be a search engine giant, all it takes to get started is to type ‘find my phone’ on google.com.If you are signed into the Google account linked to your phone – you may be asked to sign again – you should see a large information card with a map pop up right in the search results.
Hulu's live TV streaming service glitched on Wednesday night, interrupting viewers of the first Democratic debate of the 2020 election.Viewers took to Twitter to express their annoyance with Hulu.Hulu Support tweeted out a fix on Thursday and suggested "power-cycling" devices, modems, and routers — meaning turn them off, unplug them, and restart them.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Hulu viewers of the first democratic debate of the 2020 presidential election were interrupted by a streaming glitch on Wednesday night.Hulu streamed the debate as part of its live TV service.
Graduate student Elizabeth Farrell Helbling, PhD '19, and postdoctoral fellow Noah T. Jafferis from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering caught the moment on camera.The bright halogens switched on and the solar-powered Robobee launched into the air.For a terrifying second, the tiny robot, still without on-board steering and control, careened towards the lights.And with that, Harvard University's Robobee reached its latest major milestone -- becoming the lightest vehicle ever to achieve sustained untethered flight."This is a result several decades in the making," said Robert Wood, Charles River Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at SEAS, Core Faculty member of the Wyss Institute and principle investigator of the Robobee project."The change from two to four wings, along with less visible changes to the actuator and transmission ratio, made the vehicle more efficient, gave it more lift, and allowed us to put everything we need on-board without using more power," said Jafferis.
Microsoft is adding a new secured storage area to OneDrive where users can store more sensitive files.The new OneDrive Personal Vault feature will be protected by an additional step of identity verification, such as a PIN, fingerprint / facial authentication, or a two-factor authentication (2FA) code.If you store files in the new Personal Vault area, you’ll be prompted for an additional code each time you access them via the web, PC, or mobile devices.On Windows 10 PCs, Microsoft is using a BitLocker-encrypted area of a local hard drive to sync the Personal Vault files, and all OneDrive files are encrypted at rest in Microsoft’s cloud and in transit to a device.The Personal Vault will also automatically relock on a PC or device after a period of inactivity, and you’ll need to then reauthenticate to get access again.On a PC, you’ll also be able to use Windows Hello for this.
Today we’re taking a peek at the just-re-released Neon Genesis Evangelion, just re-released and available legally for the first time since the 2005 DVD collection.Netflix first announced their ties with Evangelion in March of 2019, and the series first premiered on Netflix on June 21st, 2019.But why should an average, everyday viewer care about this series from the 1990s?This anime series has been the subject of some debate, political, personal, and international since inception.The series became so important to viewers during its relatively short run on television that the show’s creator received death threats from angry viewers of the final two episodes – which ended up being the subject of movies which showed alternate endings to the series thereafter.In addition to the re-release of the series on Netflix, streaming to such a large international audience now for the first time ever, Evangelion will be the subject of another new, major motion picture in the year 2020.
Microsoft has reportedly prohibited its employees from using Slack, not just because it is a competitor to its own Microsoft Teams, but also due to security concerns about the collaboration app.GeekWire, which first heard from Microsoft employees that they were not allowed to use Slack at work, tracked down and acquired an internal list of prohibited and discouraged technology.The list said that the collaboration app, among other software and online services, are competitors to Microsoft’s own products, but the main reason that it falls under the “prohibited” category is the inability to protect the company’s secrets.“Slack Free, Slack Standard, and Slack Plus versions do not provide required controls to properly protect Microsoft Intellectual Property (IP),” reads the app’s entry on Microsoft’s list.“Slack Enterprise Grid version complies with Microsoft security requirements; however, we encourage use of Microsoft Teams rather than a competitive software.”In addition to Slack, other apps in the prohibited category are the Grammarly grammar checker and Kaspersky security software.
With the use of AI growing in almost all areas of business and industry, we have a new problem to worry about – the “hijacking” of artificial intelligence.Battling this problem and ensuring that advanced AI techniques and algorithms remain on the side of the good guys is going to be one of the biggest challenges for cybersecurity experts in the coming years.Many organizations install advanced security systems to protect themselves against APTs and other emerging threats – with many of these systems themselves utilizing AI and machine-learning techniques.Complacency, it’s been said many times, is the enemy, and in this case, it’s an enemy that can lead to cyber-tragedy.Steps organizations can take include paying more attention to basic security, shoring up their AI-based security systems to better detect the tactics hackers use, and educating personnel on the dangers of phishing tactics and other methods used by hackers to compromise system.Hackers have learned to compromise AI
The gender gap in computer science research won’t reach equality for more than a century, according to new research released on Friday that showed computer science isn’t just lagging behind, it’s also going in the wrong direction.An analysis of 2.87 million computer science research papers between 1970 and 2018 shows that “under our most optimistic projection models, gender parity is forecast to be reached by 2100, and significantly later under more realistic assumptions,” researchers wrote.“In contrast, parity is projected to be reached within two to three decades in the biomedical literature.Finally, our analysis of collaboration trends in computer science reveals decreasing rates of collaboration between authors of different genders.”The researchers laid out exactly how long of a timeline we’re looking at:The Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence in Seattle)
More

Top