Jeanette Perea

Jeanette Perea

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It looks Oppo is now bringing two more devices dubbed Oppo F17 and F17 Pro in the Indian market. With these two phones, the Chinese ... The post Oppo F17, F17 Pro to launch in India soon, teases leaked poster appeared first on Gizchina.com.
Facebook announced Wednesday that it was removing pages associated with paramilitary organizations, including the New Mexico Civil Guard. As Business Insider reported, the New Mexico Civil Guard is a right-wing vigilante group whose leaders include a neo-Confederate with a swastika tattoo and a self-styled "national anarchist" with a history of denying the Holocaust. The news comes after the New Mexico Civil Guard pulled out of a rally, featuring local elected Republicans, claiming offense at "blatantly racist" comments from other speakers. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Facebook has removed the New Mexico Civil Guard and other paramilitary organizations from its social network, it announced Wednesday. In an August 19 statement, Facebook said it was taking action against groups that "have celebrated violent acts, shown that they have weapons and suggest they will use them, or have individual followers with patterns of violent behavior." Nick Martin, editor of The Informant, confirmed the group's removal on Twitter. Facebook also told me it removed the pages of some prominent militia organizations, including:- @Oathkeepers- New Mexico Civil Guard- 3% Security Force — Nick Martin (@nickmartin) August 19, 2020 As Business Insider reported, the New Mexico Civil Guard is a right-wing vigilante group whose leaders include a neo-Confederate with a swastika tattoo and a self-styled "national anarchist" with a history of denying the Holocaust. The group has appeared, heavily armed and in camouflage, at anti-racist protests in the state, earning it plaudits from some local Republicans, who planned to pay "special tribute" to the organization at a rally on Aug. 22. Earlier this week, however, the paramilitary group announced — on its since-deleted Facebook page — that it was pulling out of that rally, citing remarks from other planned speakers that "came across as blatantly racist." That came after another speaker told Business Insider they would not participate in the rally, following our reporting. (Other scheduled speakers include Cowboys for Trump founder Couy Griffin, who has said Black athletes protesting racism should "go back to Africa," and Rick Lopez, vice-chair of the state Republican Party.) Facebook, announcing the group's removal, said it would also delete pages associated with the "QAnon" conspiracy theory, and continue to delete accounts "when they discuss potential violence." It also conflated armed paramilitary groups with anti-fascist organizations that have condoned property destruction, prompting outrage from long-time watchers of right-wing extremism. "[O]utrageous," David Neiwert, author of "Alt-America: the Rise of the Radical Right in the Age of Trump," responded on Twitter. "The far right thrives by spreading disinformation," he said. "One of the underrated aspects of Antifa is that [it] spreads accurate information about the bad actors on the far right." The company did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Have a news tip? Email this reporter: [email protected] the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Inside London during COVID-19 lockdown
The company rolls out an update to activity cards designed to improve how you retrace past searches.
Want to see what that painting would look like in your home?
Two other councils named in suit say: Not us, guv Facial-recognition tech firm Neology is suing a bunch of town and city councils in the UK after it failed to win a contract to install ANPR cameras across the North East.…
Disney Plus launched in November with a bunch of titles from its vast library — but it's missing three of the 23 Marvel Cinematic Universe movies. Distribution rights for the "Spider-Man" movies and "The Incredible Hulk" are owned by other studios. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Disney Plus launched in November with a library of Disney animated classics, blockbuster movies, and a "Star Wars" original series. But what it doesn't have are three movies from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, the highest-grossing movie franchise in history. "Ant-Man and the Wasp" finally landed on the service last week after its time on Netflix expired. Here are the 20 MCU movies Disney Plus does have available to stream, including "Avengers: Infinity War," which moved from Netflix to Disney Plus. "Iron Man" (2008) "Iron Man 2" (2010) "Thor" and "Captain America: The First Avenger" (2011) "Avengers" (2012) "Iron Man 3" and "Thor: The Dark World" (2013) "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" and "Guardians of the Galaxy" (2014) "Avengers: Age of Ultron" and "Ant-Man" (2015) "Captain America: Civil War" and "Doctor Strange" (2016) "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2" and "Thor: Ragnarok" (2017) "Black Panther," "Avengers: Infinity War," and "Ant-Man and the Wasp" (2018) "Captain Marvel" and "Avengers: Endgame" (2019) For the remaining movies, Disney doesn't own the distribution rights to them. Spider-Man's movie rights, for instance, are owned by Sony, which renewed a deal with Disney last year after a brief squabble over the character's movie future. Spider-Man can appear in the MCU, but Sony retains distribution rights, meaning the character's solo MCU movies likely won't appear on Disney Plus unless another deal is struck. Below are three MCU movies that aren't on Disney Plus and why: SEE ALSO: Netflix leads its rivals in original TV shows by a wide margin in both quantity and quality, according to new data analysis "The Incredible Hulk" (2008) Why it's not on Disney Plus: Universal Pictures owns the distribution rights to "The Incredible Hulk." The studio coproduced the movie with Marvel Studios. Unless Disney strikes a deal with Universal, the movie won't appear on Disney Plus. For die-hard MCU fans, this might be disappointing. But for casual viewers, the movie isn't an essential entry in the franchise (the actor Edward Norton was replaced with Mark Ruffalo in "Avengers"). "Spider-Man: Homecoming" (2017) Why it's not on Disney Plus: Sony owns the film rights to "Spider-Man" movies and can keep them as long as it releases a movie every five years. The studio struck a deal with Marvel Studios in 2015 to allow the character to appear in the MCU. Sony would retain distribution rights to the character's solo movies, while Disney would earn a percentage of box-office gross and all merchandising revenue. Sony and Disney struck a new deal last year for the actor Tom Holland's Spider-Man to star in one more solo movie and appear in one other MCU movie. If Disney wants "Homecoming" on Disney Plus, it will have to strike another deal with Sony. "Spider-Man: Far From Home" (2019) Why it's not on Disney Plus: Like "Homecoming," Sony owns the distribution rights to "Far From Home," and the movie won't be on Disney Plus until Disney strikes a streaming deal with Sony. It's currently streaming on Starz with a subscription. 
Michigan wants to build special roads for exclusive use by autonomous vehicles
As expected, the Fortnite Champion Series Finals will be held this weekend, determining which players walk away as the ultimate champions. This is the final evolution in the tournament, one that kicked off with the initial Qualifier rounds back on August 1 and 2. This time around, the Finals will start on Friday and last three days. Interested in watching? … Continue reading
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Plenty of hardware options exist for streaming Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon and the rest. Here are our picks for the best.
A French retailer listed a possible price for the PS5 a few days ago but we can confirm it wasn't real.
Mark Zuckerberg's fortune surpassed $100 billion after Facebook launched its TikTok competitor in the US. That makes the tech titan only the third current centi-billionaire on Earth. In June, advertisers including Verizon, Honda, and Ben & Jerry's boycotted Facebook over the social network's lack of hate-speech moderation. The boycott briefly sunk both Facebook's share price and CEO Mark Zuckerberg's net worth. Zuckerberg drives an affordable car and wears basic clothes, but appears to splurge on real estate, buying houses and then buying the surrounding properties for privacy.  Zuckerberg and his wife Priscilla Chan are generous philanthropists, investing billions in childhood education and medical research that they hope will cure all diseases in their children's lifetimes.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Mark Zuckerberg is richer than he's ever been. Facebook's shares are on a tear after the company launched a new Instagram feature that will compete with TikTok in the US. The move propelled Zuckerberg's personal net worth over $100 million for the first time. Before the announcement, Zuckerberg had been having a tough summer. Zuckerberg faced fierce criticism for refusing to moderate Facebook posts in which President Trump called civil rights protesters "thugs" and suggested violence when he wrote "when the looting starts, the shooting starts" in the wake of George Floyd's death at the hands of Minneapolis police officers. As a result, civil rights organizations including NAACP, Color of Change, and Anti-Defamation League asked advertisers to stop paying for advertisements on Facebook. Many agreed, sending both Facebook's share price and Zuckerberg's net worth into a freefall. Keep reading to learn more about how the Facebook cofounder makes and spends his centibillion-dollar fortune.SEE ALSO: A day in the life of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who works up to 60 hours a week and has a squad of 12 employees to help him with social media DON'T MISS: The richest families in the world, ranked In May 2012, eight years after its founding, Facebook debuted on the New York Stock Exchange. At the time, it was the biggest technology IPO in history. Source: Business Insider Each year since the IPO, Zuckerberg has added an average of $9 billion to his net worth. Source: Fortune Despite his status as one of the richest tech moguls, the Harvard dropout leads a low-key lifestyle with his wife, Priscilla Chan, and their two young daughters. Like many other Silicon Valley stalwarts, Zuckerberg favors a uniform. Though casual in appearance, his signature gray T-shirts and hoodies are designed by luxury brands and are reportedly much more expensive than they look, retailing for hundreds and even thousands of dollars. Source: Business Insider, GQ Zuckerberg is known for driving relatively inexpensive cars. He's been seen in an Acura TSX, and a Honda Fit, all of which are valued at or under $30,000. Sources: Business Insider, CNBC He's also been spotted driving a black Volkswagen Golf GTI, a car that he bought well into making his fortune. It's a car that would cost about $30,000 when new. Source: Business Insider But that's not to say he hasn't dropped serious cash on at least one sports car: an Italian Pagani Huayra that sells for about $1.3 million. Source: Business Insider; Yahoo There's one thing Zuckerberg doesn't seem to mind splurging on: real estate. In May 2011, he bought a 5,000-square-foot home — which he's since tricked out with a "custom-made artificially intelligent assistant" — in Palo Alto for $7 million. Source: San Francisco Chronicle, CNBC The next year, Zuckerberg began buying the properties surrounding his home, spending more than $30 million to acquire four homes, with plans to level them and rebuild. Source: San Francisco Chronicle, CNBC He also owns a townhouse in the Mission District of San Francisco. He bought the 5,500-square-foot home in 2013 and proceeded to make over $1 million in renovations, including adding a greenhouse and remodeling the kitchen. Source: Curbed San Francisco In 2014, the billionaire's real-estate portfolio jumped the Pacific when he spent $100 million on two properties on the island of Kauai: the Kahu'aina Plantation, a 357-acre former sugarcane plantation, and Pila'a Beach, a 393-acre property with a white-sand beach. Source: Business Insider, Forbes Zuckerberg said he and Chan bought the land because they're "dedicated to preserving its natural beauty." Source: Business Insider, Forbes According to Zuckerberg's Facebook page, the property's farm is home to goats and turtles. "Our farm animals are ridiculous," he captioned the photo below. More recently, he dished out on two lakefront properties on Lake Tahoe, which cost a combined $59 million. One of the houses, called the Brushwood Estate, is 5,233 square feet and on six acres. The property features a guest house and a private dock. Source: Business Insider, SF Gate Between his two Lake Tahoe properties, he owns about 600 feet of private shoreline on Lake Tahoe's west shore. Source: Business Insider, SF Gate   When Zuckerberg buys properties, he tends to buy the other homes surrounding it for privacy reasons, just like he has done in Palo Alto. Source: Business Insider   Privacy is likely the same reason that he bought the second home — and was reportedly in talks to buy a third — in Lake Tahoe. Source: Business Insider Zuckerberg doesn't appear to travel much for pleasure. But when he does travel, Facebook foots the bill. Zuckerberg's security detail and transportation cost the company nearly $5 million in 2015. Source: Business Insider However, he does occasionally get to spend time with his family while traveling. Zuckerberg and Chan met with the pope in the Vatican and reportedly gave the pope a model Facebook drone. Source: Business Insider Zuckerberg used over $1 million in Facebook funds for personal travel in 2018, making it his most expensive year yet. While in Europe, he posted about celebrating his seventh anniversary with Chan at the Parthenon in Athens. Source: Facebook In May 2019, he visited Paris to meet with French president Emmanuel Macron. Sources: Business Insider, Bloomberg The costs to protect Zuckerberg rose to over $7 million in 2017, after he spent the summer traversing America as part of his personal goal to visit every US state in a year. Source: Business Insider On his whirlwind tour around the US, the CEO dined with a family at their home in Ohio, met with former opioid addicts, worked on an assembly line at a Ford factory, met with members of the military, and even fed a calf. Source: Business Insider In 2018, Facebook approved a record-high $10 million annual security budget for Zuckerberg for bodyguards, security measures for his houses, and private aircraft. Source: Business Insider Zuckerberg has complete control over Facebook's future, thanks to his majority voting rights. Facebook's stock price rose 2% after the FTC announced approval of the social media giant's $5 billion privacy settlement. Source: Business Insider Ultimately, opulence and luxury are just a blip on Zuckerberg's radar. In fact, his main priority is giving his money away, rather than spending it. Zuckerberg is a member of the Giving Pledge, joining Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, and over 100 other billionaires vowing to donate the majority of their wealth to philanthropy. He plans to sell 99% of his Facebook shares during his lifetime. Source: Business Insider Zuckerberg said in September 2017 that he planned to sell 35 to 75 million shares over the next 18 months to fund the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, totaling between $6 billion and $12 billion. Source: Business Insider The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative is a philanthropic organization Zuckerberg founded with his wife in 2015 focused on "personalized learning, curing disease, connecting people, and building strong communities." Source: Business Insider In 2017, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative partnered with housing startup Landed, giving $5 million to help at least 60 teachers in Redwood City and East Palo Alto, California, purchase real estate. Source: Business Insider The couple's charitable initiative is invested in tackling both local and global issues. In 2016, Zuckerberg and Chan invested $3 billion into research focused on curing the world's diseases by the end of the century. Source: Business Insider In an in-depth interview with the The New Yorker in late 2018, Zuckerberg said people in Silicon Valley react to his pledge to cure all diseases in one of two ways: "A bunch of people have the reaction of 'Oh, that's obviously going to happen on its own — why don't you just spend your time doing something else?' And then a bunch of people have the reaction of 'Oh, that seems almost impossible — why are you setting your sights so high?'" Sources: The New Yorker, Business Insider In order to accomplish this lofty goal, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative launched a $3 billion nonprofit called Biohub to start looking into the cure of disease, including research on genomics, infectious diseases, and implantable devices. Source: Business Insider The scientists their nonprofit employed have started a study of brain-machine devices, including one called the Wand, which is an implant they say can help limit the symptoms of diseases like Parkinson's and epilepsy. Source: Business Insider Zuckerberg believes that his nonprofit will help speed up research to cure disease, and says that in the future, "We'll basically have been able to manage or cure all of the major things that people suffer from and die from today. Based on the data that we already see, it seems like there's a reasonable shot." Source: Business Insider Zuckerberg's leadership hasn't always been popular, however. Source: Business Insider, Business Insider Zuckerberg faced outrage from his employees and Facebook users alike after refusing to moderate Trump's posts, where the president called civil rights protesters "thugs" and suggested violence against them by writing "when the looting starts, the shooting starts." One employee of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative even asked Zuckerberg to resign if the billionaire didn't moderate the posts. Source: Business Insider, Business Insider Led by civil rights organizations including NAACP, Color of Change, and Anti-Defamation League, Facebook advertisers revolted too, pulling their ad spending from Facebook in a coordinated boycott beginning in July. The growing boycott wiped $9.6 billion off Zuckerberg's net worth between June 23 and June 28. The Hershey Co., Unilever, Verizon, Honda, Birchbox, Ben & Jerry's, The North Face, REI, and Patagonia have all signed on, vowing to withhold their ad dollars from the social networking site. "We invest billions of dollars each year to keep our community safe and continuously work with outside experts to review and update our policies," Facebook said in a statement regarding the boycott. "We've opened ourselves up to a civil rights audit, and we have banned 250 white supremacist organizations from Facebook and Instagram." "The investments we have made in AI mean that we find nearly 90% of Hate Speech we action before users report it to us, while a recent EU report found Facebook assessed more hate speech reports in 24 hours than Twitter and YouTube," the statement continued. "We know we have more work to do, and we'll continue to work with civil rights groups, GARM, and other experts to develop even more tools, technology and policies to continue this fight." Source: Business Insider, Bloomberg Billionaires Index Facebook's tide started to turn on August 6, when the launch of a new Instagram feature design to compete with TikTok sent both the company's share price and Zuckerberg's net worth to new heights. The move caused Zuckerberg's net worth to exceed $100 million for the first time, and makes him only the third centibillionaire currently on Earth. Source: Bloomberg
.In a shocking move, close to 2500 YouTube Chinese channels have been deleted by Google. Google claims to clean up disinformation on the video-sharing platform. ... The post YouTube deletes 2,500 Chinese channels appeared first on Gizchina.com.
They have big screens, S-Pens, and... one is plastic?!
Gero has raised over US$7.5 million in total funding to date.
More than 40 aboard the ship have been infected as cruise CEO admits failure.
Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Apple’s longtime marketing chief, Phil Schiller, is stepping into a somewhat smaller role after decades with the company. Schiller is dropping his role as senior vice president of worldwide marketing, but he’ll remain in charge of the App Store and Apple Events. Greg Joswiak, previously the head of product marketing, will take over Schiller’s former position as Apple’s overall marketing leader. Marketing is a huge role inside of Apple that goes beyond simply advertising products, so this marks a significant change within the company. As Apple puts it, the marketing division is “responsible for Apple’s product management and product marketing, developer relations, market research, business management, as well as education, enterprise, and... Continue reading…
There are plenty of TV series to bring that spark back.
Millions of jobs were lost over the last few months as the coronavirus decimated the US economy.  That's prompting concerns among labor advocates, workers, and others that firms could seek to replace some of those roles with automated tools like robots.  But an exec at SoftBank-backed robotics startup Brain Corp. paints a different vision of the future where robots work alongside human employees instead of replacing them.  Usage of Brain Corp's  cleaning robots in stores like Walmart grew 24% in the the second quarter of 2020, while and daytime usage grew 68%.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Millions of jobs were lost in the US over the last few months as the coronavirus pandemic forced companies to undergo mass-layoffs.  That's prompting concern among labor advocates, workers, and others that firms could seek to replace some of those positions with autonomous tools like robots instead of bringing workers back.  But an executive at one of the technology companies paving the way in robotics paints a different picture of the future: One where robots increasingly work alongside humans, freeing them up to tackle less mundane or dangerous tasks.  Brain Corp., the SoftBank-backed startup that builds the software for robots in use at companies like Walmart, Kroger, and Simon Property Group says that it saw a 24% increase in usage of its technology among customers (particularly retailers and hospitals) in the second quarter of 2020.  Many firms, for example, have more stringent cleaning protocols in-place, including requirements on how long and how often certain spaces need to be cleaned. With robots, businesses can program those benchmarks into the system and easily verify compliance once the task is over.  "We are in a much better situation to provide customers with the data they need to measure against their clean compliance standards," vice president Phil Duffy told Business Insider.  Brain Corp. has also seen a shift in when its customers are using the robots: During the pandemic, Brain Corp. reported a 68% increase in day-time usage, signaling to Duffy a broader acceptance of the use of the technology among both businesses and consumers.  "Customers are now less afraid of the impact of robots. Now, they're really keen on showing their customers that they're taking all the steps necessary to keep them safe," he said.  That's enabled janitors to focus more on the harder-to-clean areas, like doorknobs, for example, while also opening up the opportunity for those typically lower-level positions to take on more important tasks.  With minimal education, for example, janitors can be in charge of programming and overseeing the robots — given they have the deepest knowledge of the cleaning protocols in a facility.  Outside of cleaning, Brain Corp.'s systems also support robots that can autonomously bring goods from the backroom of stores, making it easier for associates to restock shelves — tech that Duffy says came in particular handy when consumers rushed out to stock-up on supplies at the start of the outbreak.  That's turning employees from basic shelf-stockers to inventory managers that can spend time making more important decisions around products.  "Retailers now have a scenario where the stores are cleaner," Duffy said. "They have a scenario where they understand what's out of stock and what needs to be brought in, and they're able to use technology to improve their shelf-stocking capabilities." Overall, Brain Corp's robots have cleaned 28 billion square feet. The company raised $36 million in April and is valued at $536 million, according to PitchBook.SEE ALSO: How Boston Scientific's 4-year digital transformation suddenly became 'business-line critical' during the pandemic Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
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