Jimmy Richmond

Jimmy Richmond

Followers 54
Following 46
Need guidance on your keyword and content strategies for YouTube? Learn five ways you can use Google Trends to uncover valuable insights.The post How to Use Google Trends for YouTube via @natalieannhoben appeared first on Search Engine Journal.
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Astronomers at the European Southern Observatory observed a black hole sucking in a faraway star, shredding it into thin strands of stellar material.
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I’ve always liked to imagine myself as a great artist, but my talents sadly aren’t quite up to par. Luckily, a new Google feature can at least make me look the part. The Big G’s latest update to its Arts & Culture app introduces a quintet of Art Filters that transform you into masterpieces by the likes of Vincent van Gogh and Frida Kahlo. The feature uses 3D-modelled augmented reality filters to map your face onto artifacts. It also applies machine learning-based image processing to keep your head movements and facial expressions aligned with the virtual objects. To use the filters, just open up the app… This story continues at The Next WebOr just read more coverage about: Google
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A fascinating exhibition of historic artefacts – and that's just the obsolete software Bork!Bork!Bork!  Today's submission to the pantheon of bork comes from reader Alastair Craft (who spotted a rolling BSOD earlier this year) via the rather splendid Museum of London Docklands.…
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Save 40% on a budget QHD webcam with dual microphones, exposure correction and noise reduction.
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The Roborock S6 Robot Vacuum Cleaner and Mop cleans extremely well, is quiet, and easy to maintain. It also doesn't get itself stuck on carpets.
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Bugs from Lodash and JQuery among the more commonly seen security problems GitLab, a rival to Microsoft's hosted git service GitHub, has for the second time tested the security of customers' hosted software projects... and found them wanting.…
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Although shielding officially ended in the summer, there are many people who are continuing to stay at home rather than expose themselves to others, even with social distancing and hygiene measures in place. Ask these individuals – who, let’s not forget, are among the frailest in our society and so have legitimate fears for their health at the hands of coronavirus – what will make the difference and the answer is usually: a vaccine.But the reality is that the Covid-19 vaccine, groundbreaking though it will be both in the speed with which it will come to market and the sheer number of people who will receive it, is not the magic bullet some are making it out to be. Clinical trials are essential in order to demonstrate that the vaccine causes the immune response necessary to reduce the chance of someone getting ill if they come into contact with the virus. Related... Coronavirus Vaccine 'Could Be Ready By End Of Year', Says WHO Director-General Yes, reduce the chance, not eliminate it. No vaccine offers 100 per cent protection. Some individuals simply don’t develop the expected immune response – for instance, this happens in five to 10 per cent of children with measles after the first dose of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) jab – whereas others respond in the first instance but then lose their immunity over time; this is why children are given repeated doses of the whooping cough (pertussis) vaccine, for instance.Testing is key for a vaccine that is potentially going to be rolled out so widely, and that doesn’t just mean the immediate reaction someone experiences after an injection such as a sore arm or slight headache. Scientists, and importantly regulators, need longer-term data on safety, such as whether adverse effects occur weeks or months later. For anyone who thinks this isn’t important, a single word of caution: thalidomide.It will also take a while for vaccine production to reach the scale at which it can meet the massive and unprecedented demand. Some of the vaccines in development are being produced using cutting edge technology – those based on RNA, for example; there are no such vaccines currently approved for human use – so it is going to potentially involve significantly more effort on the part of manufacturers than simply switching over a flu jab production line.None of this is to say the Covid-19 vaccination isn’t the right thing to do. It absolutely is.The logistics of vaccinating as many people as possible also cannot be understated. While the UK government may have secured early access to 90 million doses of two of the Covid vaccines currently being trialled  – and let’s assume that these are the successful candidates – there is a lot to work out in terms of getting supplies to the healthcare staff who run vaccination clinics, and getting the people to those clinics in an organised manner. Consider for a moment Public Health England’s annual flu report for 2019-2020: this states that over the course of several months just over 14 million vaccines were administered to people in the eligible priority groups for free NHS seasonal flu vaccination (over 65s, those with clinical vulnerabilities, pregnant women and healthcare workers), and uptake in those groups ranged from just over 41 to nearly 75 per cent. Now consider these figures in the context of the UK’s nearly 67 million population, and the impact that deploying so many healthcare workers with vaccine administration as their sole purpose will have on their usual patient duties.There will be some who refuse to have the Covid-19 vaccine, not just the traditional anti-vaxxers but also the Covid-deniers; those who reject the restrictions put in place to try and control the spread of coronavirus in order to protect the most vulnerable and manage demand on NHS services. Anti-vaxxers may benefit from an awareness campaign that emphasises how the personal and public health benefits of vaccination far outweigh the real but exceptionally small risk of post-vaccination adverse reactions, perhaps by comparing them to medicines where there tends to be less pushback. As tough a job as that is, it pales into insignificance in terms of trying to persuade Covid-refusers of the need to prioritise the greater good to society over the perceived breach of their rights.None of the above mean that Covid-19 vaccination isn’t the right thing to do. It absolutely is. And even if 60-70% of people receive the vaccine, there is a good chance that herd immunity will start to develop, which in turn can lead to gradual but safer lifting of restrictions such as lockdowns, and relaxation of measure such as social distancing. But a panacea it is not.Asha Fowells is a pharmacist and freelance journalist.More in Opinion... Opinion: Could The Second Wave Spark Riots? We're Entering Very Dangerous Territory Opinion: Trump And Johnson Are Wrong – It's Vital That We're Afraid Of Coronavirus Opinion: Coronavirus Has Universities Edging Towards Extinction Opinion: Let's Be Clear, Another National Lockdown Would Be Boris Johnson's Failure
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The best gifts for college students are practical, but fun — from waterproof speakers to a new pair of AirPods to a candle that smells like home.
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Claudia Winkleman is one of the most recognisable people on TV thanks to her role hosting Strictly Come Dancing – but you won’t catch her calling herself a celebrity. The presenter has said she “refuses” to consider herself as one, and reckons she has a very good reason for doing so – she loves her bed too much. In an interview with The Sun, Claudia revealed she prefers to be asleep than going out on the red carpet circuit. After being reminded of her huge fame, Claudia said: “That is very sweet of you to say but also wrong. I mean, I am on the Tube four times a day.“Maybe celebrity is a state of mind. I don’t go out, I don’t do red-carpet stuff, I don’t know famous people.“Maybe it’s a conscious effort to be in the public eye, and everybody who is in it, good luck to them, they do it well. It is not because I don’t respect it, I do, I just love my bed.“I love my bed more than going out, or I think I have far exceeded what I am supposed to do, so I am just going to be grateful and sleep,” she added. Claudia has been a regular fixture on Strictly since 2010, when she graduated from companion series It Takes Two to host the results show with Tess Daly. Then in 2014, she took over from the entertainer full time, and is due to return to the ballroom for the upcoming 18th series later this month. However, she recently admitted she is “just waiting to be fired” from the show. Claudia told You magazine: “I’m waiting for somebody to tap me on the shoulder and go, ‘Oh, sorry, we’ve got this all wrong, you are not allowed to go in again, we’ve got Rylan instead’, but I don’t think that’s a bad thing.”She continued: “Imposter syndrome is incredibly useful. “Feeling – don’t throw up – grateful and slightly surprised I think is a good thing. It keeps you on your toes.”The start of this year’s Strictly has been delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, and will run for four weeks shorter than usual this year. Among the stars taking part include Radio 1 DJ Clara Amfo, Olympic boxer Nicola Adams, former home secretary Jacqui Smith and comedian Bill Bailey.  READ MORE: Got Questions About How This Year's Strictly Will Work? Well, We've Got Answers Claudia Winkleman Admits She's 'Waiting To Be Fired' From Strictly As She Talks Imposter Syndrome Tess Daly Gets Candid About The Aspects Of Life In Lockdown She's 'Struggling' With Most
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Mnuchin said any coronavirus aid agreement would include another round of $1,200 stimulus checks for Americans.
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(École de technologie supérieure) To better document the repercussions of climate change on regional water resources, researchers from around the world now have access to HYSETS, a database of hydrometric, meteorological and physiographic data created by a team at the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), which contains 70 years' worth of data on 14,425 North American watersheds
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Dozens of malicious apps, some available in Play, found in the past couple months.
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Here's every detail on the company's new streaming service
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