Joshua Herbert

Joshua Herbert

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Microsoft has confirmed it is currently in discussions with ByteDance to acquire TikTok operations in the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia.
Following Rakuten and Spotify, messaging service Telegram has filed a complaint with the European Commission regarding Apple’s App Store.
The race is on. Since the introduction of social distancing measures earlier this year, the market has suddenly become a real life version of “the floor is lava”, with startups and even large enterprises jumping from idea to idea, and competing for funding, customers, and survival.   Whether their whole business model needs a reset or they need to develop new growth-focused features, many are in an innovate-or-die situation.  The latest Startup Ecosystem Report by Startup Genome found that four out of ten startups have less than three months of capital runway.  To add to this, Startup Genome found that since… This story continues at The Next Web
Photo illustration by William Joel / Photos: Getty Images Ahead of the antitrust hearing that’s due to take place later today, the opening statements from the CEOs of Apple, Google, Amazon, and Facebook have been published on the House Judiciary Committee’s website. Ranging in length from four to eight pages, the statements give us our best look yet at how Tim Cook, Sundar Pichai, Jeff Bezos, and Mark Zuckerberg plan to defend their companies from this latest wave of antitrust scrutiny, and accusations that some of their actions harm consumers and stifle competition. There are a lot of similarities between the four statements which you can read in their entirety here: Apple’s Tim Cook Google’s Sundar Pichai Amazon’s Jeff Bezos Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg For example, they all make appeals to... Continue reading…
So many questions, but it's only the second time such a phenomenon has been observed Astrophysicists have spied an extremely rare type of supernova from an exploding and possibly radioactive white dwarf that emits mysterious flashes of UV light.…
It’s no secret that sub-screen fingerprint scanners are gaining popularity more and more rapidly, replacing conventional ones even in the mid-budget segment of smartphones. At ... The post The world’s first full-screen fingerprint reader for LCD screens is ready appeared first on Gizchina.com.
On June 25th, Meizu officially announced that 10 of its models will get the latest Flyme update on top of Android 10. From June 23 ... The post Meizu’s first batch of Android 10 internal betas arrives today appeared first on Gizchina.com.
I’m in a special education classroom when I hear the news. They’ve had the first presumptive positive case of the coronavirus in Maine. We talk throughout the day about what that will mean as we wait for news from the superintendent. Will schools close down?While I am a school employee, I am not a teacher. I am an educational technician. I don’t make enough to cover the expenses for my family, and I’m not contractually paid all year, but rather during the months I work. My husband works in life insurance and investments. His job is hard even without the chaos a pandemic promises to bring. Even before Covid-19 arrived, we struggled to pay the mortgage, to cover the rising electric bill, to make the monthly payments for my daughter’s braces, and to juggle the million other expenses that are simply part of living and raising a family. Somehow, we’ve gotten by and felt the comfort of knowing we are not alone in this struggle.My family is like many others ― we live paycheck to paycheck with a bit stashed away in retirement. A small safety net is the only thing that separates us from financial devastation. I think about this every single day of my life in the best of times.This is not the best of times. Navigating this new world with even less is a new reality for many of us.  “You need to buy a few things so you can stock up,” my aunt advises via text. I know she’s right, but we budget and cannot spend more than usual — because like so many other families in the same financial situation, there is not much extra money. We do not vacation. We hold credit card debt. We stress over trying to contribute to our retirement and college funds. This is what life is like.We accept it, but when something comes along that adds even more pressure to our already-overloaded lives, we feel an overwhelming sense of dread. The powerlessness is unbearable.A small safety net is the only thing that separates us from financial devastation. I think about this every single day of my life in the best of times. This is not the best of times.But I still go to the grocery store. Standing there, I am first struck by how little is left of certain things. As I begin filling my cart with some essentials and some canned goods, I do the math in my head. This is something I have learned to do in every situation ― adding some items, putting some things back, picking up cheaper versions of items, all while evaluating what we really need versus what is a luxury.I’ve become quite adept at this skill and have even taught it to my children. “Buy the store brand” and “Look for the cheapest one” are my two most-frequent shopping requests for them. However, on this day at the grocery store, there are no cheap versions of many of the things we normally buy. Other people, probably also feeling the pinch of this pandemic, have already bought all of the lowest-priced things and left behind the versions I never buy. Words like “organic” and “gluten-free,” along with more expensive price tags, flash before me, and I feel hopeless.Ultimately, we can use my retirement savings if we have to, but there isn’t much there. Luckily, we aren’t worried about the stock market because we didn’t have the money to invest in it. I do worry about my husband and his job. While he can still work, I’m not sure what work remains for him.Sure, people need life insurance right now, but he can’t go meet with them. The loss of income for the families he serves will affect what he earns, too, since his job is based heavily on commission. We cannot live on his base salary. In truth, there isn’t much of a base. We’ve had to draw from our retirement fund to live during hard months in the past, which is part of the reason we don’t have much left in that fund. I also stress about my health. I have asthma, and therefore I’m considered high-risk for potentially experiencing serious difficulties if I end up contracting the coronavirus. Now, each cough or mild body ache I feel causes panic. In the grocery store, I turn down a different aisle when I see someone and I limit my trips in order to avoid contact with other people. I have come to fear people, even as I miss them.If I get sick, what will it cost? Even those of us with insurance often pay monthly medical bills if a kid breaks an arm or someone needs surgery. It took me over two years to pay off my daughter’s surgery when she fell from a zip line and hurt her wrist. Once that bill was paid off, another one sprung up in its place. With such precarious financial footing, many families will be pushed to their limits if they get sick and need care, especially if they are also in a high-risk group. Still, I consider myself am lucky: I am home with my kids, and many paycheck-to-paycheck families are worried about child care. With more and more restrictions on what can remain open as we try to contain the spread of the coronavirus, child care options are limited, so many parents are forced to stay home. Often, this means working from home, too. These parents who are juggling work while caring for their kids must now try to help with the online learning program kids are participating in from home.This is what it is like for so many of us now. We’re trying to balance the needs of our children, the shifting of income we thought we could count on, the fear of sickness and what it will cost, and the budgets we had set up that will now be stretched to the limit ― and possibly beyond. How will we continue to pay bills, juggle child care and work and live on such limited ― and now vanishing ― funds? There are so many reasons to be stressed and worried right now, and it’s already taking a toll.We’re trying to balance the needs of our children, the shifting of income we thought we could count on, the fear of sickness and what it will cost, and the budgets we had set up that will now be stretched to the limit — and possibly beyond.I cried on the way to work on Friday. It was my last day for at least six weeks but I didn’t know that at the time. As I cried, I made contingency plans in my head and promised to remember them and make notes when I got to work. They swirled in and out of my head before I got there.We will make it though. We will. I have to believe that, because I have no other choice. This is also what it means to live paycheck to paycheck: finding reserves of optimism amid financial chaos. It will take a lot of shuffling finances and pushing things off that we really need and tabling projects that we already couldn’t afford, like fixing our leaky roof and the broken dishwasher. This is the reality now for so many families who were already living paycheck to paycheck. What’s worse ― we’re finding we may have to confront the fact that the paychecks may stop coming altogether or might be much less than they were before.I promise myself to do a million simple things to cut corners ― cut down on hot water use by showering less or washing the million dishes a family of six generates with cold water or shutting off lights or eating less myself so my children don’t have to, but I don’t know if it will be enough. We know the struggle that we ― and millions of others ― have been through to survive with what we have, and we will make do. We’ll make it through this. We always do. We have to. Nicole Johnson is a freelance writer. This article first appeared on HuffPost PersonalHave a compelling personal story you want to tell? Find out what we’re looking for here, and pitch us on [email protected] from HuffPost UK Personal I’m An Asylum Seeker. Coronavirus Is Tearing Apart My Second Chance At Life I’m A Millionaire, And I Want To Be Taxed More To Help The Economy Recover From Covid-19 This Is What It’s Like To Be A Paramedic On The Coronavirus Frontline
Galaxy Unpacked is going to be one hell of a presentation.
Or for most recent fans: Toss a chip to your Witcher. He's found his destiny.
The Mi notebook 14 series mark Xiaomi's foray into computing devices in Indai. These laptops will be available via open sale going forward
Vestager vexed Apple has had a €13bn (£11.6bn) tax bill overturned after the EU's General Court ruled that the iGiant was not the recipient of unlawful state aid from the Republic of Ireland.…
On Tuesday, Google Cloud announced BigQuery Omni, which allows customers to use the flagship data warehouse product to store, protect, and analyze their data, no matter what cloud it is stored on. Customers had long been asking Google to make BigQuery cloud agnostic, says Debanjan Saha, vice president and general manager of data analytics at Google.  BigQuery Omni will be available for Amazon Web Services in private alpha, and support for Microsoft Azure is coming soon. The move aligns with one of Google Cloud's major strategies under CEO Thomas Kurian: Giving customers the option to run Google Cloud products on AWS and Microsoft Azure cloud platforms as well. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Under CEO Thomas Kurian, Google Cloud has increasingly allowed customers to use its tools on other cloud platforms like Amazon and Microsoft's, and now one of its most popular data services will have that option, too.  This service — called BigQuery — is Google's flagship data warehouse tool for storing, protecting, and analyzing data. Many of Google Cloud's customers had been asking for a while to be able to use BigQuery on other clouds, says Debanjan Saha, vice president and general manager of data analytics at Google. The company is finally granting their wish.  On Tuesday, Google Cloud announced BigQuery Omni, which will give customers a consistent BigQuery experience across different clouds, whether Google Cloud or a rival cloud like Amazon Web Services or Microsoft Azure. It can be difficult to use multiple clouds, Saha says, especially if data is stored in different places, but the new product allows customers to easily access it no matter where it's stored, including through creating dashboards to analyze it. With BigQuery Omni, customers don't need to manage the underlying infrastructure or hardware — the product is currently in private alpha for AWS, with Azure support coming soon.  "You know that we believe in customer choice and you have heard from Thomas and others that we believe that multi-cloud is the future," Saha said in a press call. BigQuery Omni isn't Google Cloud's first foray into giving customers the option to use multiple clouds. Last year, Google Cloud announced a hybrid cloud product called Anthos, which allows customers to run their applications in Google Cloud, private data centers, or even another cloud. The approach is seen as pivotal to Google's strategy of catching up to Amazon and Microsoft, which is lags behind significantly in cloud market share.  Read more: Google Cloud is beating Amazon to the punch with Anthos, a new hybrid cloud offering In addition, Google Cloud has made open source software a major focus by partnering with companies in that field. Often, companies choose to use open source software because it can be run on multiple clouds. In February, Google Cloud closed a $2.4 billion acquisition of Looker, which offers a data analytics product with capabilities to host on multiple clouds like AWS, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud. Analysts expect Google Cloud to continue to make major acquisitions. Kurian previously said that while Google Cloud is not dependent on acquisitions to grow, it will make acquisitions "appropriately when the time is right." Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], Signal at 646.376.6106, Telegram at @rosaliechan, or Twitter DM at @rosaliechan17. (PR pitches by email only, please.) Other types of secure messaging available upon request.SEE ALSO: Advertising tech company MadHive explains why it chose to pour millions into Google Cloud as the only platform that could help with its rising demand during the pandemic Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How 'white savior' films like 'The Help' and 'Green Book' hurt Hollywood
Virtual reality has struggled to breakthrough to mass adoption even among consumers, but companies are actively looking for ways to use it both internally and to better connect to customers.  Fidelity's Center for Applied Technology, for instance, researches out how emerging tech like VR can be used to improve business as far out as five years.  The financial giant's innovation hub is experimenting with VR to educate employees on quantum computing and create a virtual meeting space for customers to chat with advisors, among other things.  "In virtual reality, you've got this interactive blank canvas that wraps 360 degrees around you," vice president Adam Schouela told Business Insider. "It's a phenomenal visual experience and interactive experience." Sign up here to receive updates on all things Innovation Inc. BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS — Virtual reality may finally be hitting its stride.  Prior to the coronavirus, the nascent technology struggled to breakthrough to mass-adoption. And top companies, while experimenting with it, were nowhere near deploying it enterprise-wide. But now, as the pandemic rages on and more Americans are regulated to their homes, industry leaders are hopeful that consumers and businesses will flock to VR.  It has the ability to transport individuals to actual locations around the world — creating a potential market for "virtual tourism" — as well as simulated environments that can be used to train employees. Goldman Sachs Chief Technology Officer Lahtiranta even previously expressed interest in developing a VR-based trading floor.  Much of the sector has been dominated by the gaming industry. Some tech giants, like Facebook, are also gradually expanding their VR-based services. But now, more industries are trying to employ the tech. Fidelity — the Boston-based investment firm that manages nearly $8 trillion in assets — is piloting a new VR-based system that the company is hoping can eventually help both novice and experienced traders better manage their portfolios. It's just one of a slew of innovations in development in the Fidelity Center for Applied Technology, or FCAT, the hub tasked with looking three-to-five years out and determining what tech will make the biggest difference for the firm and its customers.  And the projects in the works show the early promise of using VR and other emerging tech as a key mechanism for interacting more closely with both consumers and employees.    "In virtual reality, you've got this interactive blank canvas that wraps 360 degrees around you," FCAT Vice President Adam Schouela told Business Insider. "It's a phenomenal visual experience and interactive experience." Fidelity originally demoed its virtual reality tech at the popular Consumer Electronics show in January 2019, but the projects took on a new resonance amid the coronavirus as in-person interactions dwindle.  Fidelity created a virtual meeting space to allow headset-donning investors to talk to real-life financial advisors. Those in the virtual room can ask a voice-activated personal assistant to do things, like pull up stock information on a particular company or list when a specific organization is having its quarterly earnings call. While the technology is still a prototype, the company envisions a future where the system could be linked to a customer's personal account information that the assistant could access.  It's all part of an effort to make emerging tech like VR "relatable enough" to those who don't use it everyday, according to Schouela. "And that's how we start experimenting with — and starting — proofs of concepts."   Business Insider got an exclusive tour of the FCAT center to see what other innovations were in development — including a program that virtually shrinks users down to roughly the size of an electron to explain quantum computing.  Coronavirus as a catalyst for VR While Schouela's team had been steadily working on the VR meeting room prior to the pandemic, it has taken on greater importance as more companies pivot to a remote-first environment and more consumers opt for digital experiences over the real-world.  "Who knows how long this — the current situation — is going to be," Schouela said. "These types of environments are becoming more and more and more important." There's no timeline for releasing the VR-based meeting room as an official product, but Schouela is hoping to open it up soon so that people can begin to play around with the system, though it's still figuring out the best way to do that. Its measured approach speaks to both the nascent-stage of the tech and the need to convince consumers and employees to actually use it.  While VR headsets make the experience more immersive, they are not required to experience the virtual room. When Business Insider demoed the tech, for example, we did not use a headset — instead opting to view the room through a laptop screen.  "You can literally use it from any one of these different types of devices, all to that same platform," said Schouela.  Since March, the FCAT group has been working remote. But that hasn't been a problem, given that team-members were already spread out in locations around the globe. Before COVID hit, the team even built a Rube Goldberg machine that progressed from Ireland, to Boston, to North Carolina — all powered by internet-enabled sensors that would automatically trigger the system to start in the next location. The group regularly uses Amazon Sumerian — an online VR development tool created by the e-commerce giant — to increase remote collaboration among developers.  'Honey, I Shrunk the Fidelity Employee' Another project that FCAT is working on is an educational, VR-based program to explain quantum computing to employees.  "Everybody in the firm has to be able to understand this so that they can see where this technology has the potential to displace what we're doing," said Schouela. "It's not for show. We're doing it because we want to be able to better the end-customer experience."  The virtual reality system makes the user feel like they've shrunk down to the size of a molecule and, after some initial education, takes them on a journey through a quantum computer. Hand-held remotes allow users to interact with different aspects of the simulation. Along the way, key aspects of quantum computing are described in generally accessible terms.  "Not many people get to stand right next to a quantum computer," he added. "This is one of those examples where you're getting access to something that you otherwise would never be able to have access to."SEE ALSO: How top medical device manufacturer Boston Scientific is preparing for the telemedicine wave that its digital health chief estimates could turn 80% of all physician appointments virtual Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How waste is dealt with on the world's largest cruise ship
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