Juan George

Juan George

Followers 138
Following 29
China
Services marketplace Ovvy has raised US$435,000 in a seed funding round from angel investor Rapzo Capital.The company said in a media statement that it will focus on small and medium-sized businesses, which might increase demand for graphic designers, social media content creators, and web developers.Founded in June 2018, Ovvy lets users post job requests with an asking price that merchants then bid for.Users can hire plumbers, painters, and electricians, among others, from the platform.The startup, which claims to have about 20,000 active users, said it plans to include new services such as pest control and pet sitting.Currency converted from Singapore dollars.
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Skyrim player DarkMaster06 didn’t waste a second pretending that their request on the Skyrim Mods subreddit was anything more than an elaborate “troll” mod.“Based on the Game of Thrones series, we should add a Starbucks cup to Dragonsreach.”A couple weeks ago, as part of its race to an unsatisfying conclusion that could’ve been good if the showrunners had taken their dang time, Game of Thrones left a cardboard coffee cup in a shot that made it into the show.It became a meme faster than you can say, “Yeah, I know I said I was gonna cut back on coffee before, but I’m really gonna do it this time.” HBO has since removed the shot of the cup from the episode, but its spirit lives on.Within three hours of the Skyrim Mods request post going up yesterday, two modders – Sphered and Johnrose81 – came through.They whipped up their fresh brews in eerily similar amounts of time, but each of them took an intriguingly different approach to the subtle art of crafting a throwaway meme mod.
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'Statistical significance' is one of the most widely misunderstood phrases in science, according to a 2013 Scientific American article.Probability values (p-values) have been used as a way to measure the significance of research studies since the 1920s, with thousands of researchers relying on them since.This misunderstanding is what the latest episode of the How Researchers Changed the World podcast explores, in conversation with statistician Ron Wasserstein.In particular, the podcast focuses on Ron's research into the misuse of p-values as a measure of statistical significance, which culminated in his 2016 paper: 'The American Statistical Association's statement on P-values: Context, Process and Purpose.'So, Ron was tasked with leading the creation of a framework outlining how p-values should be used in research, which would be published as a statement by the American Statistical Association , a leading authority in the statistics world.It wasn't a simple task, but although the debate regarding p-values continues, the statement has had an impact on the research world beyond what Ron could ever have imagined...
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In a string of game shows in the Noughties, I was offered no support after big losses – or big wins.Instead I was meant to be grateful for the opportunity and to do as I was told.HuffPost is part of Oath.Oath and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Oath will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Oath and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
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Content aggregator Qutoutiao doubled its net losses in the quarter ended March 31 despite strong revenue growth as the company pours money into aggressively growing its user base.Share prices for the Nasdaq-listed company plunged more than 8% on Monday by market close.Revenues in the first quarter skyrocketed 373% to RMB 1,118.8 million ($166.7 million) compared with the same period last year, driven by ad revenues from a significantly larger user base.However, despite revenues landing on the high end of analyst estimates, net losses more than doubled to RMB 688.2 million from RMB 302.6 million seen in the same period a year earlier.Average combined monthly active users (MAUs) increased nearly four-fold to 111.4 million for its two platforms, the Qutoutiao mobile app and its literature app Midu.The company reported that daily time spent on its core content aggregator app increased in the first quarter to 62.1 minutes.
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The Bose SoundSport and SoundSport Wireless are two fantastic sets of headphones that excel in a host of situations where a set of over-ear cans would be too intrusive — like bouncing between meetings or heading out on a run, for example.To be clear, we aren’t saying over-ear cans are bad.There are some circumstances, however, when they can be a bit of an inconvenience; stowing them while darting around town is tedious, for instance.So, which is the better deal?Even though the Bose SoundSport get a bigger price reduction, the SoundSport Wireless is the better of the two from a convenience standpoint (audio is comparable).Because they’re wireless, of course.
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Honestbee has been a hot topic not just within the tech community, but also among consumers.Let’s give credit where credit’s due: the company has built a successful brand that people care about.We’ve been covering Honestbee since 2014, and I daresay that if you want a real understanding of what it went through, Tech in Asia is your go-to source.My most recent piece, Honestbee: The inside story of what went wrong and what’s next, is the deepest dive yet into the history of the startup and what went wrong over the years.It also contains an exclusive interview with one of the company’s co-founders.You can follow our comprehensive coverage of Honestbee here.
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As consumers crave more real-life experiences, brands are looking for ways to leave lasting impressions beyond a clever spot or a “buy now” button.Meanwhile, tech companies have been opening pop-ups to promote hardware like the Google Home or Facebook Portal.Metrics for how they perform and whether they’re worth the cost are often still a bit of a mystery.“Experiential companies are going to need to adapt or go away,” said Mat Micheli, co-founder of Viral Nation, a Toronto-based influencer marketing agency.“What I’m noticing is that brands are becoming more conscious of what they’re getting, what they’re receiving and whether they can prove some sort of ROI.”BYOM (build your own measurements)
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Temporary General License buys time for Chinese tech giant, customers, suppliersThe US government on Monday gave Huawei permission to obtain technology from American organizations so that the Chinese giant can continue to maintain existing deployments of its products around the world, and push US-sourced software updates to people's phones.Last week, Uncle Sam banned Huawei and dozens of its affiliates from sourcing American components and code for its equipment, effectively cutting the Middle Kingdom manufacturer off from US-designed chips, software, and other components.By placing Huawei on a so-called Entity List, the US government required American organizations to get export licenses before doing any further business with the Chinese corporation, thus bringing chunks of the equipment maker's supply chain to a sudden shuddering halt.That meant Huawei phones already out in people's hands, or base stations and other networking kit deployed in the field globally, would be cut off from software updates and repairs and other parts that originated from America – such as Android operating system and app updates, or electronics.The ramifications were potentially huge: crucial telecommunications equipment out in the wild couldn't be easily repaired, security patches couldn't be issued, and so on.
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General Motors is upgrading the soul of its lineup, our political parties are still vulnerable to cyberhacking, and Game of Thrones has reached the finish line.Here's the news you need to know, in two minutes or less.GM is rolling out some new digital guts for its lineupAutomaker General Motors will soon be updating the computers in its lineup of vehicles.The new "electric platform," as they're calling it, will be five times more capable than the current iteration, the rough equivalent of updating from the original iPhone to an iPhone 7.The update will allow the company to issue over-the-air software updates to do things like improve how the engine runs or how its suspension handles bumps, even years after you drive it off the lot.
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Game of Thrones has ended its watch, but we're still reeling from the aftermath of the series finale.It evoked Lord of The Rings ending vibes (George R.R.Martin is a huge fan after all), with Arya and Jon going off on further adventures, though it retained its trademark emotional bullets, specifically the killing of Emilia Clarke's Daenerys Targaryen at the hand of Jon Snow.Clarke spoke to Entertainment Weekly in detail about the lead-up to her character's end, and why it makes total sense.Jon Snow is partly to blameIn the lead-up to Dany's annihilation of King's Landing, she suffers her best friend's death, the death of one of her dragons, betrayal by Varys and a general isolation from the people of the North.
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Xbox chief Phil Spencer has detailed Microsoft’s commitment to dealing with the toxic culture found in the gaming community.In his commentary on the matter, Spencer kicked off the details by saying, ‘First, gaming is for everyone.’ As such, says Spencer, ‘Second, gaming must promote and protect safety for all.’ Under these two ‘fundamental truths,’ Microsoft’s head of Xbox explained, the company is publishing multiple commitment that will improve gaming for everyone.No single group owns gaming, Spencer said in a blog post published on both the official Xbox news site and Microsoft’s own blog.Everyone is ‘welcome to play and welcome to all the fun and skill-building that comes with gaming,’ he states, concluding that, ‘In this way, when everyone can play, the entire world wins.’The gaming community is home to a huge variety of people from every walk of life, including everyone from ‘grandmothers learning about their grandchildren through play’ to soldiers, parents, kids, and teachers.As such, says Spencer, ‘Gaming must be a safe environment.’ The burden for crafting this safe environment lies on both gamers themselves and the companies in the industry.
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Huawei has had its restrictions around conducting business in the US scaled back.Last week, the US Commerce Department added Huawei to an "entity list" that blacklisted the company from buying parts from US businesses without government approval.The restrictions on Huawei have been reduced so the Chinese company is able to work with its existing cell phone customers in the US.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.The US Commerce Department on Monday created a temporary general license restoring Huawei's ability to maintain existing networks and provide software updates to existing Huawei handsets.The license, which was posted for public inspection, scales back the restrictions imposed by the US government last week on Huawei's buying US goods in order to help existing customers.
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Last week, it was reported that hackers had managed to install spyware on a large number of smartphones thanks to a previously unrevealed vulnerability in WhatsApp (it has since released an update to patch the issue).Now, the founder of a rival messaging service, Telegram, claims that WhatsApp users should never expect it to be secure.In a post on the Telegraph blogging site, Telegram founder Pavel Durov claimed that WhatsApp’s security issues stem in part from the decision by its parent company Facebook not to release the source code to the app.Durov claims that WhatsApp goes even further and tries to blur the app’s binaries.This means software security researchers cannot take a detailed look at them to discover privacy issues.In addition, Durov speculates that Facebook and WhatsApp may allow government agencies to access backdoors to those apps to combat cyber criminals.
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Industrial emissions come from a lot of different things, including the manufacture of common chemicals.Overall, the chemical industry consumes about 10 percent of global final energy, according to the International Energy Agency.In a recent PNAS paper, researchers from universities in Germany and California tried to estimate how effectively the chemical industry could decarbonize and whether such a decarbonization is likely.But the transition would require so much renewable energy that it's far more efficient to focus on decarbonizing transportation and even residential heating first.The researchers looked at 20 large-volume chemicals made from fossil-fuel-based hydrocarbons, including paraxylene (a feedstock in the creation of polymers and polyester), toluene (which is found in paint thinner, contact cement, and some types of glue), propylene (which is found in film, fiber, packaging, and clothing), and methane (which is refined to make rocket fuel as well as hydrogen for industrial ammonia synthesis).Generally, this requires some combination of capturing CO2 and using renewable electricity to reform that CO2 to a synthetic hydrocarbon.
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Google's new Pixel 3a has earned many raves for offering an amazing camera at the comparatively low price of $399.(Read CNET's Pixel 3a review to learn more.)Want it for even less?For a limited time, Best Buy is offering the Google Pixel 3a (64GB) for $299.99 when you activate the phone on Sprint.Note that it's currently out of stock, but the product page says "Getting more soon," and you can still order now.Whereas previous Pixel phones have courted the flagship market, the Pixel 3a aims squarely at midrange buyers.
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Almost 70 per cent of drivers would be willing to install smartphone apps that block texting and browsing according to new QUT research - but only if they can still do hands-free calls and listen to Bluetooth music.Study leader Dr Oscar Oviedo-Trespalacios said 68 per cent were willing to use an app that blocked text messaging, web browsing and email features, so long as it still allowed hands free calls.But only 37 per cent were prepared to embrace the idea if calls were blocked completely.Retaining the ability to use music-playing functions was also important to app acceptance.But 17 per cent confessed to doing 'visual-manual tasks' that involved touching their phone, such as texting, browsing and emailing.Fifteen per cent reported occasionally looking at their phone for more than two seconds, and 19 per cent said they occasionally monitored/read conversations without writing back.
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In addition to a Ram recall affecting some 400,000 trucks, Fiat Chrysler has a second recall covering more than 100,000 vehicles.Chrysler late last week issued a recall for nearly 200,000 examples of the 2017-2019 Chrysler Pacifica minivan.The affected vehicles carry build dates between Oct. 11, 2016 and Nov. 20, 2018.Vehicles built after that date feature an updated component that does not present an issue.The problem stems from the wiring harness.A specific sealer used during the manufacturing process might cause a loose battery ground joint.
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Several major tech hardware companies will no longer supply Chinese tech giant Huawei with the parts it needs to manufacture smartphones and other electronics, according to a new report from Bloomberg.Existing Huawei users will still get security updates, but newly produced smartphones will likely lose access to applications like Gmail in the near future.But it’s not clear what kind of impact there will be on Huawei beyond the next three months.The move comes after the US Trump regime blacklisted Huawei last week over concerns that the company has close ties to the Chinese government.A new report from the Financial Times this morning reveals that top U.S. intelligence officials, including Dan Coats, the director of national intelligence, have recently briefed American tech executives on the supposed “dangers of doing business in China.” The meetings reportedly started in October and have been led by a bipartisan delegation of Republican and Democratic lawmakers.“We have to increase awareness among U.S. companies, investors, and universities about the tactics China is now using to undermine US competitiveness, security, and influence,” Democratic senator Mark Warner, one of the people involved in the briefings, told the Financial Times.
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A US preliminary report into a fatal Tesla crash in March involving its Autopilot self-driving technology has found that the tech was engaged for 10 seconds before the crash.The driver had apparently removed his hands from the wheel about 8 seconds before the crash, according to the US National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), which is carrying out the investigation.The roof of the Tesla Model X was sheared off and its 50-year-old driver was killed when the vehicle drove under the trailer of a semi truck that was crossing its path in March 2019.The driver was previously named as Jeremy Beren Banner, 50, with the incident having taken place on a highway in Delray Beach, Florida.“Tesla drivers have logged more than one billion miles with Autopilot engaged,” the company said.The March incident has similarities to a May 2016 crash in which a Model S also drove under the trailer of a semi truck crossing its path.
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