Kenneth White

Kenneth White

Followers 133
Following 24
US
As we move toward having fully automated smart homes, one smart device is hard to ignore: the smart mattress.Perhaps the most well-known smart mattress is the Sleep Number mattress, which lets you adjust the firmness on both sides and tracks your sleep quality through your smartphone.Ending May 27, Sleep Number is taking hundreds of dollars off its most popular smart mattresses, each giving you the ability to track your sleep with the SleepIQ app and adjust the bed to your and your partner’s liking.If your partner turns into a human space heater at night or you often find yourself piling on more blankets, this is an ideal choice.Still, smart mattresses aren’t cheap when compared to their traditional counterparts, so why should you invest in them?Here are just a few reasons:
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UK
The recent drama surrounding Huawei and the ban imposed by the US government has caused some chaos in the Android world.There will probably be no shortage of smartphone users from the other camp that are feeling relieved that they are far removed from all that.Of course, it’s business as usual in Apple land and even Huawei headlines won’t stop this year’s “iPhone 11” generation from also making waves.Even if it’s just unbranded model numbers found in a regulatory database.Any sign of the existence of any new iPhone is, of course, good news.Clues to how many models there might be is even better.
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The Trump administration's assault on Huawei could end up harming Google and other US tech giants, said Gregor Berkowitz, a tech industry consultant with extensive experience in China and Asia.The US government's move to bar the Chinese device maker from using US tech products and services could encourage it to promote Chinese apps and services outside of China, Berkowitz said.Investors have already started to worry that Apple may get caught in the crossfire of the Trump administration's attacks on Huawei and the broader US-China trade war.The administration's moves against Huawei could end up giving a leg up to the Chinese competitors to US behemoths such as Google and harm those tech giants' ability to compete, particularly in the developing world, he said.Last week, as part of its targeting on Huawei, the administration issued an order barring US companies from supplying Huawei with their products and services.That move not only barred smaller component makers from dealing selling their products to the Chinese company, but it also will prohibit Google and other tech companies from offering their software to Huawei.
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Faced with escalating accusations of bias from the right and an onslaught of calls to break up Facebook on the left, the social media juggernaut released a data dump Thursday that its leaders hope will help the public better understand how it moderates content—and remind them that the bigger Facebook is, the more it can invest in fending off these threats.In most, though not all categories, the company explained how prevalent views of that content were, how many pieces of content Facebook took action on, how much of it Facebook found before users reported it, how many enforcement decisions Facebook users appealed, and how much content was restored after that appeal.The report also includes some never-before-shared insights into certain categories of banned content, including child sexual exploitation and terrorist propaganda, which Facebook says accounted for .03 percent of all views in Q1 of 2019.According to the report, Facebook catches more than 99 percent of those posts before a single user reports them.In a press call introducing the reports, CEO and founder Mark Zuckerberg argued that Facebook's size is precisely what makes the company a responsible watchdog for the internet."We really need to decide what issues we think are the most important to address and to focus on, because in some ways, some of the remedies cut against each other in terms of making progress."
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UK
“We can’t just knock on someone’s door and tell them that they are going to become a drug addict…”Meera Kanhouwa has seen the impact of America’s opioid epidemic all too first hand.As a veteran emergency medicine physician, she estimates that she has personally treated 70,000 patients with opioid-related afflictions: from pregnant addicts whose babies are born suffering from withdrawal symptoms, to thousands of overdose patients; some arriving at the emergency room dying; all at risk of relapsing.Once at the medical front line of the country’s opioid addiction crisis – where abuse of prescription pain killers, heroin, and synthetic opioids such as fentanyl is estimated to cost taxpayers $78.5 billion yearly and kill hundreds of victims daily – the Potomac-based doctor is now a managing director at Deloitte, and the face of a new predictive analytics tool built by the professional services giant on DataStax Enterprise and Google Cloud.Demonstrated publicly this week at DataStax’s Accelerate conference in Washington, Opioid360 is a link analysis platform designed to identify individuals at risk of becoming opioid addicts; a predictive tool that performs visually like that of data mining company and law enforcement favourite Palantir.But in the world of big data and machine learning, those rubber bands are made of public datasets, and no human fingers tug them to the next pin on the board – the tool finds its own patterns…)
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Amazon wants its third-party sellers to store more merchandise in its warehouses to ensure it has enough inventory of popular products to execute one-day shipping, so it is offering discounts on monthly storage fees up to 75%.That’s according to an email to independent sellers from Fulfillment by Amazon, the service in which Amazon stores, packs and ships products on sellers’ behalf, which was sent to Adweek.A rep for Amazon confirmed the discount.The email notes that more inventory on hand means Amazon can place goods closer to customers.The promotion begins June 1 and runs through January 31, 2020.According to the email, from June 1 to September 30, monthly storage fees will drop from $0.69 to $0.17 per cubic foot.
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UK
It was a pun waiting to happen – Uber has launched an underwater ride-hailing service named, naturally, ScUber.ScUber is a partnership with Tourism and Events Queensland, and will take pairs of passengers for a trip to Australia's Great Barrier Reef.Uber self-driving cars: everything you need to knowYou can book your trip through the regular Uber app, but unlike UberX, UberXL or UberBLACK, which are charged based on a flat fee, plus rates of charge and distance, a dip in the sub will set you back a flat fee of AU$1,500 (about $1,000, £800) per person.It takes two to dive, so that fee will be doubled for each sub.That's pretty steep, but you'll be helping save the reef you're visiting; as part of the project, Uber is donating $100,000 to Citizens of the Great Barrier Reef to help preserve the delicate coral ecosystem.
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UK
A new USC study has shed light on the thermostat wars that go on in homes and offices around the country.Women always seem to be cold, and men always seem to be hot leaving neither ideally comfortable in most settings.The study found that women perform better on math and verbal tasks at higher temperatures.However, the study found that the relationship between temperature and men’s performance was less pronounced than in women.Study results suggest that gender is an important factor in determining the impact of temperature on comfort, productivity, and cognitive performance.Study author Tom Chang says that it had been documented that women like warmer indoor temperatures than men but until now the idea had been that the warmer temps were just a personal preference.
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Here are 83 of the latest relevant social media marketing statistics to trick out and inform your marketing efforts, with a particular focus on certain fascinating new B2B-specific data.1 Sprout Social Index: Edition XV: Empower & Elevate (2019)2 Hootsuite / We Are Social: Digital 2019 Q2 Global Digital Statshot.3 Pew Research Center: January 2019 Core Trends Survey (2019)4 Microsoft Fiscal Year 2019 First Quarter earnings Release (2019)5 How LinkedIn’s Products Are Evolving to Support the New World of Work (2019)
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UK
Qualcomm has been handed a legal setback after a US judge issued a damming verdict against the firm.The US ruling says that Qualcomm illegally suppressed competition in the market for smartphone chips by threatening to cut off supplies and extracting excessive licensing fees from mobile manufacturers, Reuters reported.Last month Apple surprised many when it opted to end the bitter legal battle, and also agreed to make an undisclosed payment to Qualcomm, and use its chips going forward.But the Apple case aside, Qualcomm has been facing regulatory investigations around the world for a number of years now.US regulators have also made similar allegations, with the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) accusing Qualcomm in 2017 of violating antitrust law.The San Diego-based company produces the chipsets for many of the world’s leading smartphones and tablets.
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Invented approximately 50 years ago, surgical medical meshes have become key elements in the recovery procedures of damaged-tissue surgeries, the most common being hernia repair.When implanted within the tissue of the patient, the flexible and conformable design of these meshes helps hold muscles tight and allows patients to recover much faster than through the conventional surgery of sewing and stitching.Thus, antibiotic therapies, which are time-limited, could fail against these super resistant bacteria and the patient could end up in recurring or never-ending surgeries that could even lead to death.As a matter of fact, according to the European Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance Network (EARS-Net), in 2015 more than 30,000 deaths in Europe were linked to infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria.In a recent study published in Nano Letters and highlighted in Nature Photonics, ICFO researchers Dr. Ignacio de Miguel, Arantxa Albornoz, led by ICREA Prof. at ICFO Romain Quidant, in collaboration with researchers Irene Prieto, Dr. Vanesa Sanz, Dr. Christine Weis and Dr. Pau Turon from the major medical device and pharmaceutical device company B. Braun, have devised a novel technique that uses nanotechnology and photonics to dramatically improve the performance of medical meshes for surgical implants.Because gold nanoparticles have been proven to very efficiently convert light into heat at very localized regions.
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John Goodenough, a University of Texas at Austin professor in the J. Mike Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering in the Cockrell School of Engineering, has won the Royal Society of London's Copley Medal, the world's oldest scientific prize.Already a fellow of the Royal Society, Goodenough has been honored for his exceptional contributions to materials science, including his discoveries that led to the invention of the rechargeable lithium battery used in devices such as laptops and smartphones worldwide.The Royal Society first awarded the Copley Medal in 1731 -- 170 years before the first Nobel Prize -- and gives it annually for outstanding achievements in scientific research.As the 2019 recipient, Goodenough joins an elite group of past awardees including Benjamin Franklin, Charles Darwin, Louis Pasteur, Albert Einstein and Dorothy Hodgkin."Professor Goodenough has a rich legacy of contributions to materials science in both a fundamental capacity, with his defining work on the properties of magnetism, to a widely applicable one, with his ever-advancing work on batteries, including those powering the smartphone in your very pocket," said Venki Ramakrishnan, president of the Royal Society."The Royal Society is delighted to recognize his achievements with the Copley Medal, our most prestigious prize."
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Samsung’s research center at Moscow has developed a new AI that can create talking avatars of photos and paintings without using any 3D modeling.A paper posted by the research team suggests that while traditionally researchers have used a large number of images to create a talking head model, a new technique can achieve it by few, or potentially even one image.In a video, engineer Egor Zakharov, explains that although it’s possible to create a model through a single image, training it through multiple images “leads to higher realism and better identity preservation.”Samsung said that the model creates three neural networks during the learning process.First, it creates an embedded network that links frames related to face landmarks with vectors.Then using that data, the system creates a generator network which maps landmarks into the synthesized videos.
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What on Earth are you playing at, Microsoft?We think physically, with our bodies, and our toys help us get our hands around what we think.That's what makes Minecraft Earth so interesting.At a casual glance, it looks like little more than the latest-and-greatest revision of the most influential video game of the past generation.Look underneath: all of Microsoft's new strengths in augmented reality and cloud computing support a venerable title.For half a decade, Hololens and Azure seemed as though they marched to the tune of different drummers, in different directions, but in Minecraft Earth these paths unexpectedly cross.
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China
Alibaba-owned online marketplace and retailer Daraz has named Rakhil Fernando as managing director of Daraz Sri Lanka, effective June 1, 2019.He will head the company’s business strategy and overall operations in the country, according to a statement.Prior to this appointment, Fernando was the innovation director at LumenLab, the Asia-focused innovation arm of insurance firm MetLife.He also served as CEO of Kashmi, a peer-to-peer payments and digital banking platform that operated in Singapore and Sri Lanka.Set up in 2012, Daraz has its own online marketplace and logistics business that target customers in South Asia.The company, which also operates in Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Myanmar, claims to have over 10 million products in more than 100 categories.
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The first time we heard about a 100MP medium format camera from Fujifilm was back in September of last year, at Photokina 2018.Since then, the rumor mill has been rife with whispers of this high-resolution camera, but they can all now be put to rest.The Fujifilm GFX 100 has officially debuted, packing a mammoth 102MP backside-illuminated (BSI) CMOS sensor working alongside a speedy X-Processor 4 image processor, which has previously starred in Fujifilm's X-T30 snapper.This marriage, Fujifilm says, helps the GFX 100S achieve autofocus (AF) speeds that are twice as fast the GFX 50S.In fact, given the sensor is 70% larger than a 35mm full-frame counterpart, Fujifilm prefers to call the GFX 100 a "large format" camera rather than a medium format one.The new pro shooter includes with some jaw-dropping specs that, combined, promise all-round top-notch performance.
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When the agenda goes up, so do the tickets...Event If terms like FaaS, serverless and event-based computing are creeping onto your todo list, here’s something else to add: grabbing a blind bird ticket for our Serverless Computing Conference while you still can.The agenda for Serverless Computing London goes live in a couple of weeks, but until then tickets are just £500 plus VAT for the November event, which happens at the QEII Centre in the heart of London, England.Once again we’ll be looking over the full gamut of serverless platforms, including AWS Lambda, Azure Functions, and Google Cloud Functions.But we’ll also be looking at the surrounding tooling, and those crucial issues like monitoring and keeping your serverless apps secure.The focus throughout will be on the real world application of the technology, with tech leaders showing how they’ve applied it to problems in their own businesses.
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No word if a trip through Manchester was scarier than atmospheric reentryHaving spent the last 20 months being lugged around the UK, the Soyuz capsule used to ferry British Astronaut, Tim Peake, safely back to Earth is returning to London’s Science Museum.The capsule has enjoyed an eight-stop tour of the UK, popping up in locations as diverse as the National Railway Museum in York, Peterborough Cathedral and the Ulster Transport Museum Belfast, as well as visiting locations in Scotland and Ireland.All in all, the organisers reckon the attraction clocked up 1.3 million visits.Peake traveled to the International Space Station (ISS) on 15 December 2015 aboard Soyuz TMA-19M and accompanied by NASA's Tim Kopra and Russia’s Yuri Malenchenko.The gang, expedition 46/47, spent more than six months in orbit and returned safely to Kazakhstan on 18 June 2016.
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NASA is planning to return to the moon within five years, thanks to a directive handed down by Vice President Mike Pence in March.However, if it is to put astronauts back on the lunar soil, it's going to need a lot more cash.On May 14, the White House requested an additional $1.6 billion to top up the proposed $21 billion in funding for the agency over the 2020 fiscal year.On Wednesday, the House Committee on Appropriations, which controls the government's purse, left that additional request out of NASA's spending plan, Quartz reports.The White House had proposed the additional funding come from unused cash from an aid program, the Pell Grants Program, designed to help low-income students get to college.The chair of the committee, Rep. Nita Lowey called it an "unconscionable proposal," according to Quartz.
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The study looked at recipes of homemade sunscreens shared on the popular website Pinterest and found these concoctions were woefully worse at actually protecting our skin from UV radiation than commercial sunscreens.Pinterest, like other social media sites, has quickly become a haven for users to upload and share information (in this case, images) on so-called natural and alternative treatments made at home.“It made us want to look at what people are making themselves that could be potentially harmful for them or their children.And coconut oil was having a moment—everything seemed to have coconut oil in it.So that made us want to look at homemade sunscreens, because it’s very common there,” senior study author Lara McKenzie, a principal investigator in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in the US state of Ohio, told Gizmodo via phone.So McKenzie and her team, whose study was published in Health Communication, conducted two searches on the site, using the terms “homemade sunscreen” and “natural sunscreen.” Then they took a sample of the searches—every fifth image—and studied their contents more closely using whatever information was available.
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