Kevin Murphy

Kevin Murphy

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Following 39
US
Researchers drew attention three years ago when they reported that a two-dimensional perovskite - a material with a specific crystal structure - composed of cesium, lead and bromine emitted a strong green light.Crystals that produce light on the green spectrum are desirable because green light, while valuable in itself, can also be relatively easily converted to other forms that emit blue or red light, making it especially important for optical applications ranging from light-emitting devices to sensitive diagnostic tools.But there was no agreement about how the crystal, CsPB2Br5, produced the green photoluminescence.Now, however, researchers from the United States, Mexico and China, led by an electrical engineer from the University of Houston, have reported in the journal Advanced Materials they have used sophisticated optical and high-pressure diamond anvil cell techniques to determine not only the mechanism for the light emission but also how to replicate it.While CsPbBr3, the base crystal, is three-dimensional and appears green under ultraviolet light, the new material, CsPB2Br5, has a layered structure and is optically inactive.At the time, there were two schools of scientific thought on the light emission from the cesium crystal: that it emitted green light due to a defect, mainly a lack of bromine, rather than the material itself, or that a variation had unintentionally been introduced, resulting in the emission.
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TVs are getting more and more advanced every year.If you’ve been living your life in 1080p and planning to upgrade to 4K TV, you may want to check out this deal on the Sony 49-inch Bravia 4K HDR LED TV.It combines High Dynamic Range (HDR) and 4K Ultra HD resolution to deliver superior picture quality with exceptional detail, color, brightness, and contrast.This TV boasts a newly developed 4K HDR Processor X1 Extreme which takes everything you watch and upgrades it to near 4K HDR quality.An object-based HDR Remaster technology can recognize, analyze, and optimize each object individually to adjust the overall contrast, resulting in a more natural and realistic picture.It also comes with X-Motion Clarity, a revolutionary feature from Sony that refines action on the screen in real time with an incredible refresh rate for a brighter and clearer quality.
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But "Halo" is far from the only game we know that's coming to next-gen game consoles.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.Sony's PlayStation 5 and Microsoft's Project Scarlett— the next Xbox — are scheduled to arrive next fall."It's in the concept and design [stage] — this is what it is, this is what it will be, these are some of the parts it will have."There is no announced launch window for "The Elder Scrolls VI," but we can guess based on Howard's statements that it's anywhere from two to four years away.The legendary "Halo" franchise helped make Microsoft's Xbox a household name back in 2001.
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Today we’re taking a peek at the just-re-released Neon Genesis Evangelion, just re-released and available legally for the first time since the 2005 DVD collection.Netflix first announced their ties with Evangelion in March of 2019, and the series first premiered on Netflix on June 21st, 2019.But why should an average, everyday viewer care about this series from the 1990s?This anime series has been the subject of some debate, political, personal, and international since inception.The series became so important to viewers during its relatively short run on television that the show’s creator received death threats from angry viewers of the final two episodes – which ended up being the subject of movies which showed alternate endings to the series thereafter.In addition to the re-release of the series on Netflix, streaming to such a large international audience now for the first time ever, Evangelion will be the subject of another new, major motion picture in the year 2020.
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An Australian Court has ruled that media organisations are liable for anything defamatory that’s published to the public Facebook pages of those media companies, even if it’s just posted by a random Facebook user.The Supreme Court of New South Wales ruled today that Facebook pages controlled by the Australian media companies Fairfax, Nationwide News, and Sky News all contained defamatory content and that they should be held liable despite the fact that none of the news organisations published the content to Facebook themselves.Dylan Voller, an Aboriginal-Australian whose abuse at a youth detention facility was documented by Australia’s public broadcaster in 2016, brought the lawsuit against a number of Australian news organisations for content on their Facebook pages that was posted by third parties.Facebook commenters reportedly made false allegations that Voller had attacked a Salvation Army officer, leaving him blind in one eye.Voller never asked for the comments on Facebook to be taken down, at least according to the media companies.Previously in Australia, publishers were only liable for comments in which the subject of the defamation had asked them to be removed but failed to do so.
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Businesses and individuals with a third-level domain (.co.uk, .org.uk, .me.uk, .net.uk, .plc.uk or .ltd.uk) have until Tuesday morning to secure the shorter second level (.uk) equivalent of their domain before it becomes available to the public.Five years ago, Nominet, the registry for the .uk domain launched a new shorter domain ending called .uk.Registrants of existing .co.uk domains were given five years to decide if they wanted the corresponding .uk domain.On Tuesday, June 25, the five year 'Right of Registration' period will come to an end with the deadline closing at 6:00 am BST.So if you haven't yet registered for a .uk domain, now is your last chance.Why your business needs a .uk domain, now rather than later
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Pi-Top today announced its latest model – the Pi-Top [4].Oh, and it’s not a laptop.That’s a weird one, because Pi-Top is known for its elaborate Raspberry Pi-based portable computers.In its early years, the company 3D printed its machines, but as time has dragged on, its computers have become increasingly sophisticated – and, dare I say, a bit more professional.The Pi-Top [4] comes in a square package and looks not too dissimilar from one of Intel’s NUC computers.It’s got a tiny footprint, but somehow manages to include a small integrated screen and a built-in battery.
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The rumor mill has long suggested Microsoft is working on a dual-screen Surface, but we’ve seen little in the way of specifics.Originally, rumors pointed towards a pocketable device named Andromeda, but more recently it seems Microsoft is focusing on a larger device codenamed Centaurus.A report from Forbes has shed some light on what we might expect from the device.IHS Markit, a market research firm with “supply chain info,” told Forbes the foldable Surface could be released the first half of next year and is expected two have dual 9-inch screens and a 4:3 aspect ratio.It’s also anticipated to use Intel’s upcoming 10-nanometer Lakefield chips and feature LTE or 5G connectivity.The software might be just as interesting as the hardware.
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To read the full article, simply click here to claim your deal and get access to all exclusive Business Insider PRIME content.Supurna VedBrat, BlackRock's head of trading, said the $6.5 trillion firm is navigating how to "operate at scale" in the rapidly-changing fixed income markets.As more trades are completed electronically, BlackRock is looking to work with five or six firms directly, and then use aggregated platforms like TradeWeb and MarketAxess.The world's biggest asset manager is figuring out how to stay on top of the rapidly-changing fixed income market.Supurna VedBrat, BlackRock's head of trading, said at a conference last week that the $6.5 trillion firm is working out the best ways to "operate at scale" as increasing amount of fixed income volume has begun to trade electronically, thanks to the rise of electronic trading marketplaces like MarketAxess and Tradeweb.See more: A BlackRock executive highlights the new kinds of skills he's looking for in a $2 trillion business - and why old-school traders are still important
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decided to head to the high street and poke around local supermarkets to find out how easy they make it for their customers to correctly recycle waste, and it turns out that the answer is 'not very'.Taking 46 items from the shelves of Tesco, Waitrose, Aldi, and Asda - to name but a few - the study set out to investigate how much of the product packaging was recyclable, and incidentally discovered that a lot of it wasn't even labelled correctly.“Our research shows there is a lot more supermarkets and manufacturers can do to banish single-use plastics and make sure any packaging they do use is minimal, recyclable and correctly labelled, so that shoppers know exactly how they can recycle it,” said Natalie Hitchins of Which?Easy to recycle packaging was deemed as such if it could be disposed of in one of the multitude of bins found in households, and only 52 per cent met that standard.42 per cent wasn't labelled at all, or was incorrectly labelled, with Morrison's apparently being the worst of the bunch.From the selected sample, 61 per cent was deemed not easily recyclable, and Morrison's was quick to pipe up, calling the study "misleading," with a spokesperson stating that over 80 per cent of the supermarket's plastic packaging is recyclable, "and that’s across tens of thousands of items, not the 46 collected by Which?”
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For the first time, scientists have been able to study how well synthetic bone grafts stand up to the rigors and 'strains' of life, and how quickly they help bone re-grow and repair.Researchers led by Dr Gianluca Tozzi, at the University of Portsmouth, are the first to examine the strains between bone and graft from animal models in 3D and in microscopic detail.Dr Tozzi hopes this window on to living bone grafts will help scientists find ways to improve the body's ability to regrow its own bone, and more chance surgeons can predict the success of a synthetic graft.Fragile bones break easily and are also more difficult to repair, particularly when the defect area is extended.It's vital we understand what is happening where bone meets graft so we can better engineer sophisticated replacement materials."Bones are very complex biological tissues and a synthetic bone substitute needs to have specific requirements to allow blood supply and encourage new bone growth.
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In this article Yuval Stein, AVP Technologies at TEOCO looks at the use of machine learning to optimise the roll out of 5GThe invention of the stethoscope was thanks to shyness rather than a spark of genius.Instead, he rolled up some paper, and found that he was able to hear much better.The earliest designs of stethoscopes were simple wooden tubes and it was many years before the instrument we see as emblematic of healthcare was created.Before, it was normal to treat symptoms rather than underlying causes—now, through this new device, doctors had insight into what was going on inside the body, and were better able to understand the diseases behind the symptoms.Machine learning as a stethoscope
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At Shopify Unite, Shopify’s fourth annual developer conference, it was business as usual—lots of conversations, lots of panels, lots of coffee.That is, until Craig Miller, the company’s chief product officer, announced the Shopify Fulfillment Network (SFN), which gives merchants another fulfillment option than other third-party logistics providers or Fulfillment by Amazon—a choice that Miller said is part of “what’s core to Shopify.”Adweek sat down with Miller after his keynote to chat about some of the announcements Shopify made, as well as how the company decides what’s best to build for merchants.Shopify’s in the business of democratizationThe SFN, Miller explains, came about to help businesses achieve a “best-in-class experience” to merchants of all sizes.Since Amazon’s known for its capabilities in ecommerce, Shopify decided to bring that same experience to merchants—and let the merchants focus on building their brand instead.
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A giant squid has been caught on camera in U.S. waters for the first time ever by researchers who were looking for creatures living in the "midnight zone" of the sea.The squid was found 2500 feet below the surface in complete darkness and can be seen attacking a probe, which was being used to draw any creatures towards the camera.The scientists, who are part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Journey into Midnight project, were using a specialized camera system called the Medusa.This technology uses red light that is undetectable to sea creatures but allows the pitch black ocean to be illuminated enough for researchers to spot elusive animals and discover new ones.The Medusa probe has a fake jellyfish attached to it, which mimicked the luminescent defense mechanism of a jellyfish and alerted creatures like the giant squid that a meal might be nearby.Rare footage like this excited the researchers but they had to rush back to shore to find a squid expert who could confirm they were looking at a giant squid.
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32-bit binaries will still run, insists Canonical, but it may not be good enough for key appsCanonical's decision to cease development of 32-bit libraries in Ubuntu 19.10 "eoan" means it won't support Steam gaming runtime and devs say the Wine compatibility layer for running Windows apps will be little use.The Steam news was reported on Twitter by Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais, who said "Ubuntu 19.10 and future releases will not be officially supported by Steam or recommended to our users."Ubuntu has caused anxiety with its announcement that "the i386 architecture will be dropped" in the next release.Some presumed this meant i386 libraries would not be shipped at all, meaning that no 32-bit applications would run.Ubuntu says i386 to be 86'd with Eoan 19.10 release: Ageing 32-bit x86 support will be ex-86
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It is still not clear whether the source of the gas was the lettings off of microscopic organisms or whether it was produced by rocks interacting with water.The gas was detected by the Rover's tunable laser spectrometer.It found methane at 21 parts per billion by volume in the Martian atmosphere.But NASA will conduct more experiments this coming weekend to try and discover whether the reading represents a plume or something more substantial.Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Principal Investigator Paul Mahaffy of NASA noted: "With our current measurements, we have no way of telling if the methane source is biology or geology, or even ancient or modern."The rover has found methane at a confusing variety of levels suggesting possible seasonal variation or specific plumes.
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Chinese retailer Suning.com has signed an agreement with Carrefour Group to buy an 80% equity interest in the French retailer’s China business as a slew of international retailers adjust their strategies in the country.Suning will pay RMB 4.8 billion (around $699 million) for the deal which values Carrefour China at RMB 6.0 billion, according to a company statement released on Sunday.Carrefour Group will retain a 20% stake in the business and two seats out of seven on Carrefour China’s supervisory board.As a major appliance seller and e-commerce platform, Suning has been pushing its offline expansion to various segments including convenience stores, supermarkets, and department stores.The omnichannel retailer, which operates a network containing upwards of 8,881 stores in more than 700 cities, aims for 15,000 offline stores this year.The move follows Suning’s February acquisition of 37 Wanda department stores from Chinese conglomerate Wanda Group.
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The Trump administration is apparently looking into requiring that 5G equipment used in the US be designed and put together outside China.The talks kicked off after an executive order issued last month required a 150-day review of the US telecoms supply chain, the Wall Street Journal reported Sunday.White House officials want to know if telecom equipment manufacturers can make hardware destined for the US, like cell tower electronics, routers, switches and software, according to the report, which cited anonymous sources.The review deadline isn't until October, so these conversations seemingly are in early stages and any decisions could take years to adopt.Companies like Finland's Nokia and Sweden's Ericsson -- both of which sell equipment to U.S. wireless carriers -- to move some operations outside China to maintain those relationships, the report noted.Trump's May order specifically targeted Huawei, essentially banning the Chinese company in light of national security concerns that it had close ties with the country's government -- a charge it repeatedly denied.
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Considers Requiring 5G Equipment for Domestic Use Be Made Outside China – The Wall Street JournalWhat happened: The Trump administration is seeking to require all equipment for next-generation 5G networks used in the US be designed and manufactured outside of China.The move would expand its ban on Chinese telecoms giant Huawei to all Chinese companies, as well as foreign companies that manufacture products in China.Officials are asking telecom equipment makers whether they can develop US-bound hardware including cellular base stations, routers, and switches as well as software outside of China.US officials said they are acting urgently because telecom operators are starting to build their 5G networks to power a “fourth industrial revolution,” which “will be built on the telecommunications networks being constructed today.It is critical that those networks be trusted,” a Trump administration official said.
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If you thought the heat wave-induced melting of half of Greenland’s surface was alarming, wait until you hear the long-term projections for its ice sheet.Research published last week in Science Advances finds that if emissions continue to climb at their current rate, all of Greenland’s ice could melt by the year 3000, causing sea levels to rise 23 feet and redrawing coastlines around the world.On timescales a bit closer to home, doing nothing to rein in carbon emissions soon could translate to ice losses from Greenland that raise sea levels six inches to a foot by 2100, and 2-5 feet by 2200, permanently inundating low-lying coastal cities and island nations.The researchers arrived at their grim findings by using supercomputers to run ice sheet models out to the end of the millennium.They looked at three different carbon emissions scenarios, one in which we rapidly ratchet down global carbon emissions, a middle of the road scenario, and a worst-case scenario where we keep burning fossil fuels with abandon, modelling each one 500 times.The models featured improved representation of the flow and speed of outlet glaciers, those frozen rivers that drain ice from Greenland’s interior and dump it out to sea.
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