Larry Johnson

Larry Johnson

Followers 42
Following 33
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President Donald Trump reportedly plans to direct China's ByteDance to divest its ownership of social media app TikTok's US operations. Fox Business Network's Charles Gasparino reports Microsoft is in talks to buy the stake. Microsoft and TIkTok have yet to respond to requests for more information. Are you a Microsoft employee? Contact this reporter via encrypted messaging app Signal (+1-425-344-8242) or email ([email protected]). Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As President Donald Trump reportedly plans to order TikTok parent company ByteDance to sell the social media app's US operations, Microsoft has emerged in one unconfirmed report as a potential buyer. Fox Business Network's Charles Gasparino reports Microsoft is in talks to buy the stake. Microsoft and TikTok have yet to respond to Business Insider's requests about the reports. Gasparino also reported the White House is "deeply concerned" about Microsoft's potential purchase and whether any Chinese investors would retain a stake in TikTok's US operations, citing unnamed sources. Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message her on Twitter @ashannstew, or send her a secure message through Signal at 425-344-8242.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
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Combining different imaging techniques helped document the changes made over time.
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge The CEOs of Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon are testifying in Congress today — trying to convince the House Judiciary Committee that their business practices don’t amount to anti-competitive monopolies. It’s one of the biggest tech oversight moments in recent years, part of a long-running antitrust investigation that has mustered hundreds of hours of interviews and over a million documents from the companies in question. Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Apple’s Tim Cook, and Google / Alphabet’s Sundar Pichai have all laid out their defense strategies in published testimony. They make the case that their companies are providing beneficial products in a landscape filled with competition and that their massive scale... Continue reading…
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(University at Buffalo) How does water leave a sponge? In a new study, scientists answer this question in detail for a porous, crystalline material made from metal and organic building blocks -- specifically, cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate, 5-aminoisophthalic acid and 4,4'-bipyridine. Using advanced techniques, researchers studied how this crystalline sponge changed shape as it went from a hydrated state to a dehydrated state.
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(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) The Big Data in Atmospheric Physics (BINARY) project at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) has been granted EUR 1.5 million in funding by the Carl Zeiss Foundation. The basic idea of this interdisciplinary project that unites atmospheric physics and computer science is to apply state-of-the-art methods of statistical data analysis and machine learning to various scientific problems in atmospheric physics.
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Olivia de Havilland, one of the last remaining stars of Hollywood’s golden age and the oldest living Academy Award winner, died of natural causes on Sunday at her home in Paris. She was 104.Her publicist Lisa Goldberg confirmed the news to The Hollywood Reporter.Gracing the silver screen in both big and small roles, in a career stretching over 50 years, de Havilland was perhaps best known for her performance as Melanie Hamilton in “Gone with the Wind,” and for making multiple films with Errol Flynn. She won the Academy Award for Best Actress twice, for “To Each His Own” in 1946 and for “The Heiress” in 1949.She is also forever enshrined in the history of workplace law, scoring a major legal victory over the Hollywood studio system in 1944 that became informally known as “the de Havilland law.” Her lawsuit against Warner Brothers resulted in California state regulations that limited the extent to which artists could be bound to contracts. It catalysed the eventual end of the powerful studio system, which often constrained actors’ career opportunities.De Havilland had a lifelong personal and professional rivalry with her younger sister, Joan Fontaine, which became a major part of her star persona and the stuff of Hollywood legend. The two actors ― the only pair of siblings to win Oscars in a lead acting category ― clashed over everything from their careers, to their romances, to their mother’s funeral. Fontaine, who died in 2013, said de Havilland resented sharing the spotlight and began antagonising her younger sibling as soon as she was born.“I remember not one act of kindness from Olivia all through my childhood,” Fontaine said in a 1978 interview with People magazine.Both were nominated for the Best Actress Oscar in 1941 ― Fontaine for Alfred Hitchcock’s “Suspicion” and de Havilland for “Hold Back the Dawn.” They were sitting at the same table when Fontaine was announced the winner.“I stared across the table, where Olivia was sitting directly opposite me. ‘Get up there, get up there,’ Olivia whispered commandingly. Now what had I done?” Fontaine later recalled in her memoir. “All the animus we’d felt toward each other as children, the hair-pullings, the savage wrestling watches, the time Olivia fractured my collarbone, all came rushing back in kaleidoscopic imagery. My paralysis was total.”Unlike her sister, de Havilland rarely spoke about the feud. But in an interview with The Associated Press for her 100th birthday in 2016, she referred to Fontaine as “Dragon Lady” and described their relationship as “multi-faceted, varying from endearing to alienating.”“On my part, it was always loving, but sometimes estranged and, in the later years, severed,” de Havilland said. “Dragon Lady, as I eventually decided to call her, was a brilliant, multi-talented person, but with an astigmatism in her perception of people and events which often caused her to react in an unfair and even injurious way.”De Havilland was born in Tokyo on July 1, 1916, to British parents. She grew up in California, where she and Fontaine, a year and a half younger, were raised primarily by her mother, a former theatre actor.As a teenager, she began performing in community theatre productions and gave up a college scholarship when she landed a role in a production of William Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” at the Hollywood Bowl. She reprised the role in Warner Brothers’ movie adaptation in 1935, which launched her film career.“It was an illustrious beginning,” she told Entertainment Weekly in 2015.The studio paired her with Flynn, who ended up being her co-star in a total of eight feature films. Their onscreen chemistry spurred rumours of a real-life romance, but de Havilland repeatedly denied it. Later in life, she admitted to having feelings for Flynn, saying that their last film together felt like a “loss.”“I experienced a sense of grief and loss, a terrible feeling, but couldn’t define it at the time. I had sort of a sense of that you may know a person one way but not others. Errol and I were not sharing experiences and life but instead sharing the lives of these characters we were playing,” she recalled in a 2006 interview. “But, oh, he did mean a great deal to me, but in that day, a woman did not declare her feelings for a man.” After the success of “Gone with the Wind,” de Havilland’s career continued to soar. In addition to winning two Oscars for Best Actress, she also received nominations for “Hold Back The Dawn” and “The Snake Pit.” In the latter film, released in 1948, de Havilland played a woman living in a psychiatric hospital after experiencing a mental breakdown. The movie’s realism inspired states to reform conditions in mental institutions.De Havilland grew tired of the film industry and her celebrity by the 1950s. She moved to Paris, where she would remain for the rest of her life, taking fewer acting roles and preferring reality over the artifice of Hollywood.“I loved being around real buildings, real castles, real churches—not ones made of canvas,” she told Vanity Fair in 2015. “There were real cobblestones. Somehow the cobblestones amazed me. When I would meet a prince or a duke, he was a real prince, a real duke.” Later films included “Light in the Piazza” (1962) and “Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte” (1964), co-starring her friend Bette Davis. She also returned to theatre and appeared on numerous TV shows, including the NBC miniseries “Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna,” for which she received an Emmy nomination in 1987. As de Havilland got older, her deteriorating vision and hearing forced her to conduct interviews over email. Even in writing, though, she maintained her charm and wit and was candid about her career, including her experiences with sexism in Hollywood ― “a fact of life I simply had to accept,” she said in 2016.“Men felt threatened and mistrustful of women who had good ideas, and one had to employ immense tact when dealing with directors and producers,” she said. Men felt threatened and mistrustful of women who had good ideas, and one had to employ immense tact when dealing with directors and producers.Olivia de HavillandIn 1965, she became the first woman to serve as president of the Cannes Film Festival’s jury. The French government appointed her a chevalier of its Legion of Honor in 2010.U.S. President George W. Bush awarded her the National Medal of the Arts in 2008 “for her persuasive and compelling skill as an actor in roles from Shakespeare’s Hermia to Margaret Mitchell’s Melanie. Her independence, integrity, and grace won creative freedom for herself and her fellow film actors.”Although de Havilland retired from acting in 1988, she still made occasional public appearances to commemorate her films and career. As one of the only surviving stars of “Gone with the Wind,” she often attended anniversary celebrations of the classic film.She was met with a standing ovation when she introduced a presentation of previous Oscar winners at the 75th anniversary of the Academy Awards in 2003.“There have also been tributes and similar occasions that have called me back to Hollywood,” she said in 2015. “I’ve returned so often, I almost feel that I’ve never left.”Before she turned 100, she said that she hoped to live to 110. She remained in good health in her later years, regularly taking the stairs at her home in Paris and doing The New York Times crossword puzzle.At the peak of her stardom, de Havilland had several famous Hollywood romances, including with business mogul Howard Hughes, actor Jimmy Stewart and director John Huston. She married and divorced twice, first to American screenwriter and novelist Marcus Aurelius Goodrich. Their son, Benjamin, died of Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 1991.She is survived by her daughter, Gisele, from her second marriage to French journalist Pierre Galante.
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Listen to HuffPost Life’s weekly podcast Am I Making You Uncomfortable? about women’s health, bodies and private lives. Available on Spotify, Apple, Audioboom and wherever you listen to your podcastsAs borders between countries start to reopen and coronavirus lockdown rules begin to relax, we’re lusting for that holiday feeling after months of being cooped up indoors (even if we’re not all ready to jet off to Marbs quite yet).Sun, sea, sand and snogs from a beautiful stranger – who doesn’t love a holiday romance? Fuelled by warm weather, a carefree, ‘joie de vivre’ mindset and perhaps too much sangria, someone you wouldn’t look twice at back home seems suddenly attractive on foreign shores. Those feelings of intense lust and longing coupled with the time limit of a looming plane ticket home can turn on the holiday goggles every time.HuffPost UK spoke to those who fell hard for their holiday beaus to hear their unexpected travel fling stories. From drunkenly transporting expensive art across a foreign city to bringing your laundry along for an impromptu trip, love on the road is nothing if not random.Related... What You Need To Know Before Booking A Holiday This Year ‘He reminded me of Villanelle from Killing Eve’ Liz Beardsell, 38, an event producer and podcaster for Diary, She Wrote in Hackney recalls her memorable birthday adventure in Paris two years ago.“I wandered into an art gallery and the guy running it invited me to join him at his desk for a glass of red wine. He was white, dark-haired, handsome and had a look of Daniel Day-Lewis about him,” she explains. “I accepted his invitation, it led to a kiss, he gave me his number and the following morning I headed to his apartment and spent a few hours naked with him until we needed to return €20,000 worth of art.“After drunkenly clumsily wrapping it up together, like the Chuckle Brothers, we transported it in an Uber to another art gallery on the other side of Paris.”Beardsell saw the funny side but was also slightly on edge about potentially breaking one of the 3D elements and drastically reducing the piece’s value.“From here we went for red wine, steak and frites,” she recalls. “He told me he had been to jail for six months when he was 18 for beating up a man who’d groped his sister. He went to the toilet and came back to a full restaurant, locked my eyes, did a pirouette like a ballerina, and then bowed to the pretend crowds.”“The whole time we were together, he reminded me of Villanelle from Killing Eve – it was like witnessing two different personalities. He was confident, flirtatious and good looking. I really enjoyed his company and I was fascinated to see what was going to happen next, or what new story he was about to tell me.” ‘I asked him: Do you have a washing machine?’For Rochelle White, 34, who runs a marketing and PR agency in Milton Keynes, romance arrived when she used to work as a PR rep in Ayia Napa and got talking to an olive-skinned Turkish Cypriot man after the clubs were shut. “We chatted until the sun started to rise. I was hungry and we went to the shops and he bought me some fresh bread and Ribena,” says White. “He dropped me home where I was staying. He asked me to pack some things and bring my passport for tomorrow the day I met him and told me he was going to take me somewhere. Me being cheeky I asked: “Do you have a washing machine?” and he replied, “yes?” The next day I packed my passport along with my washing and we went to North Cyprus for the day.”That one day turned into four, White realised it was a big risk at the time, but she felt safe and trusted him. Their relationship lasted the rest of the summer season and the following two seasons when she returned to Ayia Napa. They even met up once when she returned to the UK. “We were never official, but we spent most evenings together. Although there was an age gap, it never felt like there was. We both were fun and didn’t take anything too seriously, loved the same music and just went with the flow,” she explains. “It naturally fizzled out, but I don’t know how it would have panned out if it was in the UK. We still speak to this day, but I would honestly say, it was one of the most fun, random summer romances I had ever had.”Related... Get The Party Started: Will We Ever Go Clubbing Again? ‘Sex was awkward, sweaty, poorly ventilated’James*, 27, writer based in New York, was on a working holiday covering a film festival in France when he met a young fellow American woman in the queue for waffle sandwiches. “I overheard her speaking English. I asked her if she was American as well and in town for the festival — we ended up eating lunch together and exchanging numbers,” he says. “Once I’d finished my writing that night, I texted and found out that her hotel was only a few blocks from my Airbnb. She nabbed a bunch of the little bottle of liquor from her hotel room (on her employer’s dime, of course) and brought them to the beach. We drank little nips of vodka and talked over the gentle crash of black water, which felt too romantic not to be acted on.”Related... Rules, Rants And Toilet Sex – Wedding Guests Share Their Most WTF Stories “We went back to mine, watched about twenty minutes of the film Kate Plays Christine in what I can now recognise as poorly-conceived foreplay and had awkward, sweaty sex. I remember, it was so damned hot and the flat I was staying in was so poorly ventilated that we both had to take a cold shower afterwards and tried to have sex again. Once we’d both collected ourselves, she left for the night, and I didn’t see her again during the festival.”Later in the year, they kept missing each other at different film festivals and fell out of touch. “We never met up again! I suppose that’s the faintly tragic end this romance deserves.”‘I dumped his demanding ass and had a fling with a Brit instead!’ Seetal Savla, 39, social and PR Manager, North London, had a French fling while working as a waitress on a holiday camp in Brittany when she was 17.She started seeing an older French man and things were going well until he started pressuring her to sleep with him. “We had a decent relationship. I was working and he was on holiday, so our time together was limited. We mainly kissed, cuddled and so on, but he wanted to take it further,” she explains. “He said I was frigid, made me feel bad for not wanting to go ‘all the way’ and that he’d dump me if I didn’t. Even though I wasn’t the most confident teen, I wasn’t going to cave in to this pressure when I wasn’t ready, so I dumped his demanding ass and had a better fling with a Brit instead!”‘He made soup and wrapped me in a blanket’Andrew, 30, a fitness trainer from Manchester fell for the receptionist who opened the door for him on his last-minute solo trip to Porto. “I’d booked the cheapest hostel. It was so run down I couldn’t even find the place and had to ask locals in very broken Portuguese. But when he finally arrived, he saw the receptionist and “felt chemistry with him right away”, he says. “I dropped subtle hints every time I popped hoping he’d notice and eventually plucked up the courage to ask him out on the last night because why not? I had nothing to lose. To my surprise, he actually said yes and offered to cook for me after his shift.” Together, they drank good wine as the receptionist made a delicious soup at his place. “I remember it being winter and they didn’t have heaters, so he wrapped a blanket around me. We cuddled and kissed, but didn’t do anything more.“It was such a perfect end to a holiday, I’ll never forget it,” says Andrew. “Sadly, I never stayed in touch with my Portuguese receptionist. I had moved on to Lisbon before returning home and he only spoke about three words of English.”‘I knew I’d met the actual love of my life’Olivia Mushigo, 23, a PR manager from London, was travelling around Thailand with her friends when she met a Swedish Iraqi DJ on a night out on the island of Koh Phi Phi – and knew it was love at first sight.“He was performing at the club we were in and I loved his confidence. I told my friend I was taking him home with me – obviously as banter. She then went up to him and to my surprise, he came up to me. I don’t know what magic words she said, but we got talking and all moved on to another club with his friends.“The next day we went on a date, we went to a restaurant and had a motorcycle ride around the island. It was the first time I was on a motorcycle but he was really good at calming me down. He was such a gentleman and did little things like holding the door open and pulled out my chair.” Despite the strength of feeling, the romance ultimately didn’t stay the course. “He was a bit older than me and sadly it didn’t go any further,” says Mushigo, with a sigh. “A friendship would’ve been nice – he was so easy to talk to. If it wasn’t for the distance, we’d definitely still be together.” Related... 'Happy, Loved, Free': How We Make Our Open Relationships Work I Tried Sex In A Park During Lockdown. It Was Exciting, But I Wouldn’t Do It Again So, Are We Going To Get Our Sex Lives Back Anytime Soon?
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It’s a big day for Xbox fans and, indeed, anyone who is looking forward to the next generation. Later today, Microsoft is hosting a game showcase for Xbox Series X in which it will show off a number of first-party games that are currently in development at its various Xbox Game Studios. Halo Infinite is the headliner of this event, … Continue reading
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(Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard) Psoriasis afflicts millions of people worldwide, but treatments are limited to small molecules like steroids, which can cause skin thinning and lose their effectiveness over time. A Wyss Institute collaboration has circumvented those problems by using a topical ionic liquid to effectively deliver an RNA-based therapy directly into the skin of mice with psoriasis, which reduced multiple psoriasis-related gene products as well as redness and inflammation, resolving the longstanding challenge of delivering nucleic acids into cells.
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It could also help with the treatment of brain disorders
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Nikon is offering a new gateway into full-frame ownership – or should that be obsession? – with the new Nikon Z5, promising a big sensor with a relatively small price. Based around a 24.3-megapixel FX-format CMOS sensor, the Z5 gets the same EXPEED 6 image processor as its more expensive Z-series siblings, but starts out at under $1,400. There’s ISO … Continue reading
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YouTube channel Stuff Made Here has published a new video showing off what is arguably one of the riskiest ways to cut your own hair: using a homemade robot wielding a pair of sharp scissors. No, host and subject of the video Shane doesn’t lose an eye or an ear during the haircut, but he does show off the construction … Continue reading
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On July 1, OnePlus allowed one hundred people to place pre-orders for OnePlus Nord smartphone. On July 8 and 15, two more stages passed, which ... The post OnePlus Nord is up for pre-orders in several countries appeared first on Gizchina.com.
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Amazon is being sued by six Staten Island warehouse workers who claim the company didn't do enough to protect them against the coronavirus. Amazon says it takes the health of its workers seriously, and as part of its defence it claims it told workers they could take time to go wash their hands without fearing reprisal. Amazon also on Monday sent an email to workers at the Staten Island warehouse telling them hand-washing wouldn't count as idle "time off task," and they wouldn't be penalized for not hitting their quotas. Its lawyer said this has been a policy since March. The employees bringing the lawsuit claim they were never informed of this. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Amazon is arguing with warehouse workers in court over whether it told them they could step away from their stations and wash their hands without being penalized. Three workers from Amazon's JFK8 Staten Island warehouse filed a lawsuit against the company in June, alleging that lax safety measures around the coronavirus endangered their health. One of the plaintiffs said she became infected with COVID-19  in March. Within a month her cousin died from COVID-19, according to the complaint. There are now six workers suing the company as part of the suit, which broadly alleges the company didn't do enough to protect workers from the spread of the virus inside the warehouse. As part of its defence, Amazon claims that it relaxed rules about how much time workers could take away from their stations to wash their hands. Bloomberg was first to report that Amazon is fighting over whether it communicated to workers that taking time to wash their hands would count as "time off task." "Time off task" (TOT) is Amazon's term for when employees are away from their workstations outside of their allotted breaks. If workers spend too much TOT managers can ask why they're away from their stations and they can be reprimanded, a UK-based Amazon worker told Business Insider. It's part of Amazon's machinery to keep worker productivity high and make sure they hit their quotas, known as "rates." According to a letter submitted to the judge by Amazon's lawyer Jason Schwarz, Amazon sent an email to workers at the Staten Island warehouse on Monday saying time spent hand-washing and performing other safety measures wouldn't be counted as TOT, and that workers wouldn't be penalized for not hitting their quotas. It also put up posters in the bathrooms. Amazon's lawyer said the policy had been in place since March but that it had re-sent the message "in an abundance of caution." The workers bringing the suit say this is the first they're hearing of hand-washing being exempt The warehouse employees bringing the suit claim they were never informed of this policy. "To date, no managers or supervisors at Amazon have notified me that Amazon has changed its rate and TOT productivity standards," said Derrick Palmer, one of the plaintiffs who still works at JFK8, in a declaration filed Monday.  "I have continued to work as fast as I did before the outbreak of COVID-19, and I have continued to do things like rush back to my workstation following breaks or skip trips to the bathroom to wash my hands, in order to keep my rate up and to limit my TOT," he said. Palmer said part of his job entails keeping track of how other workers are using their TOT. He said he was not told by his supervisor that hand-washing has any sort of special dispensation. Palmer's "rate" refers to how many items he's expected to process in an hour. "Amazon managers are still writing rates on the whiteboards in the stand-up areas, just like they did before the pandemic," Palmer added. A UK-based Amazon worker who spoke to Business Insider, who recently underwent orientation at their warehouse, said they have received no communication about hand-washing being exempt from TOT. Amazon was not immediately available for comment when contacted by Business Insider. JFK8 Staten Island is the same warehouse which fired worker Christian Smalls after he organized an employee protest against working conditions. Amazon claims it fired Smalls for breaking quarantine measures, although lawmakers have questioned this version of events.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 7 secrets about Washington, DC landmarks you probably didn't know
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(Kyushu University, I2CNER) Composite membranes for CO2 separation contain different functional layers in their structure (e.g. porous mechanical support, selective layer etc.). We found that when selective layer in composite membrane is made ultimately thin - it forms specific interface with supporting gutter polymer, and this structure shows unexpectedly high selectivity towards CO2 over nitrogen. This new finding provides the way to develop better membranes for CO2 capture.
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Google for India Digitization Fund will invest and forge partnerships in the country over the next five to seven years.
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US lawmakers have repeatedly raised security concerns over the app's Chinese ownership. Are US businesses next?
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Cloud operations, or cloudops, is becoming the problem to solve as enterprises operationalize their cloud and multicloud deployments. The ideal pattern of management involves a pragmatic approach to operations by leveraging tools to automate predetermined procedures and runbooks. Right now, many overwhelmed managers toss cloudops tools at the problems and hope for the best.The issue is one of balance. To put cloudops solutions and tools to their best uses, you need to define why and what before you determine how. It’s not that the tools are unimportant; rather, the tools should meet specific requirements, such as performance, security, cost management, governance, automation, and self-healing.To read this article in full, please click here
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Malware developers have begun to mix politics with their malicious payloads according to the Cisco Talos Group which recently discovered a payload named Trump.exe.The firm first found the politically-themed payload while investigating a recent malspam campaign and they then decided to look into other malicious programs that contained political references or themes and found hundreds of other examples.In a blog post titled 'How adversaries use politics for compromise', the Talos Group explained their methodology, saying:"Pivoting off of this campaign, we began to look for other IOCs that utilized political references.We developed a list of various names, terminology and iconography that has generated headlines across the political spectrum over the past few years.We then began a search throughout various malware repositories and discovered that not only were political names and iconography surprisingly common, but the results produced a wide variety of threats and was almost a microcosm of what we see on the threat landscape daily."
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Italy has become the first country in the world to make lessons on climate change compulsory in schools, in a move announced by the country’s education minister, Lorenzo Fioramonti.The news comes as students around the world continue to strike from school to protest a lack of action on climate change, while leading scientists have declared a “climate emergency”.HuffPost is part of Verizon Media.Verizon Media and our partners need your consent to access your device and use your data (including location) to understand your interests, and provide and measure personalised ads.Verizon Media will also provide you with personalised ads on partner products.Select 'OK' to continue and allow Verizon Media and our partners to use your data, or select 'Manage options' to view your choices.
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Google two years ago launched Teachable Machine, a web experiment intended to elucidate machine learning concepts.It let any user with a webcam train an AI model to output specific media — an image, sound, speech, or GIF — corresponding with a hand gesture, object, or activity.Now Teachable Machine is expanding to incorporate inputs beyond those it initially supported, including audio.Additionally, it will allow folks to export their trained models to websites, apps, devices, and more.Google says it worked with people across industries with different needs — like architect Steve Saling, who has amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) — to test and shape the new Teachable Machine.“People are using AI to explore all kinds of ideas — identifying the roots of bad traffic in Los Angeles, improving recycling rates in Singapore, and even experimenting with dance,” wrote the company in a blog post.
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In April 2018 Facebook implemented new rules restricting the amount of personal data third-parties could access following the Cambridge Analytica scandal.These rules precluded app developers from gaining access to individuals' data through Facebook groups.Facebook admitted on Tuesday a recent review has revealed some 100 app developers still had access to users' data through private groups.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.More than a year after Facebook clamped down on how much personal data third parties could see, the company has found some app developers still had access to people's data through Facebook Groups.In the wake of the Cambridge Analytica scandal Facebook tightened its rules on what personal data app developers could access.
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China’s Xiaomi looks set to extend its smartphones, and other product offering to more markets.We reported earlier today that the Chinese brand is mulling foraying into the Japanese market in 2020, and now comes report of its expansion into Sweden.The company already sells smartphones in India, China, and 20 other countries, and with the planned roll out in China, the figure will be rising to a total of 23.The firm isn’t currently present in the US market, at least not yet.Talk of devices coming to the US has been around for years but hasn’t materialized, though you can still get Xiaomi smartphones in the market through other means.Speaking of its launch in Sweden, the brand has now scheduled a launch event for November 13th in Sweden.
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Apple announced the iPhone 11, 11 Pro, and 11 Pro Max at a special event on Sept. 10, 2019, on its futuristic campus in Cupertino, California.It comes in six different colors, including a great yellow, a subtle purple, a green, black, white, and a special red version.Apple has also added a new Night Mode that automatically activates when the light is low, and a slow-motion video mode.The iPhone 11 uses the new A13 Bionic processor, which Apple claims is the fastest processor ever in a smartphone, and is 20% faster than the A12 Bionic inside the previous generation iPhone models.It is currently available for pre-order, and deliveries will start on September 20 when the phone fully releases.It comes in a stunning midnight green, space gray, silver, and a new gold finish.
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The hearings are expected to take two to three weeks, and are the first for the three key executives charged for their alleged roles in the OneCoin cryptocurrency caper.Mark Scott, once a partner at major law firm Locke Lord, was arrested just over a year ago at his beachfront property in Cape Cod, Massachusetts.The FBI accused the 50-year-old of acting as a money launderer for OneCoin, which has taken in an estimated $5bn worldwide, and making many times his salary by moving funds from the scheme.Prosecutors allege that OneCoin works by getting people to purchase packages of the cryptocurrency with the assurance that at some point it will go live on a public exchange and they will become instant millionaires.But, it is claimed, there is no evidence that OneCoin even possesses the fundamental foundation of a cryptocurrency – a blockchain – and the entire program is a multi-level marketing pyramid, where members receive commissions for recruiting others.Incredibly, despite the FBI case and widespread global media reports, OneCoin continues to function across the world and its founder – the self-titled "CryptoQueen" Ruja Ignatova – remains at large.
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Alcohol breath tests, used by police stations across the country to convict drunk drivers, often produce inaccurate results, a New York Times investigation found.The skewed results can be from problems with software or how police stations maintain hardware.Still, the tests are highly regarded as accurate by law enforcement.Now, judges and states are starting to question the tests and throw out thousands of convictions.That can help some who were wrongly convicted, but also could let dangerous drivers off the hook.Alcohol breath tests, used by police stations across the country, often produce results that are incorrect, an investigation by the New York Times found.
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The new iPhone 11, 11 Pro and 11 Max have arrived and so have a multitude of cases to protect them.As always, when the new iPhones arrive every year, I've put together a list of my favorite cases, with a focus on those that are relatively slim but offer strong protection.A few budget cases are included, but since this is supposed to be more of a best-of-the-best list, most of my picks tend to cost more than the typical generic case you'll find on Amazon for $20 or less.Also, since the iPhone 11 comes in a variety of colors people may want to show off, I've included a number of cases that are translucent.If you're looking for a clear case for your new smartphone, you can't go wrong with Speck's Stay Clear case that resists discoloration (yes, cheap clear cases can turn yellow), provides 13-foot drop protection and includes Microban antimicrobial product protection.The case also allows for easy wireless charging.
Sweden
Macrumors har publicerat nya uppdaterade skärmdumpar på gränssnittet i Hitta-appen i IOS 13.2 som det kommer se ut när Airtags har släppts.Skärmdumparna hittades av en läsare och visar hur Apple har stuvat om i designen en aning sedan september då Macrumors publicerade de första bilderna.Guilherme Rambo på 9 to 5 Mac har rotat runt i IOS 13.2-uppdateringen som släpptes i går och har hittat nya uppgifter om den prylhittarbricka som Apple ser ut att snart ha redo för lansering.Tidigare har den bara varit känd som "B389".Guiherme Rambo har hittat en mapp med bildresurser till den, men bilderna i mappen är hämtade från andra produkter som Homepod och Airpods.Det är en modell Apple har använt tidigare för att försöka dölja registreringen av olika varumärken.
UK
Gatwick Airport and its chums at EasyJet have been experimenting on their human cargo, and appear to have come up with a method that gets passengers on their aeroplanes to exotic short-haul destinations a fair bit quicker.The airport loading life hack you won't believe?They analyse the makeup of the passenger load for a flight, then call the window-seat sitters first.Once they're on, they fill the aisles, then leave the irritating families with their endless overhead locker fiddling until last.This, they say, can lead to at least a 10 per cent time saving when it comes to loading up an aeroplane, giving the pilot a little less time to orient him or her self and prepare for the next mission.Gatwick's also segmenting the plane's layout more in another trial, with detailed new boarding screens better prepping passengers for the aggressive scrum come boarding time.
UK
When a leaflet for a camera called the EOS Ra appeared on Canon UK's site in September, it piqued the photography world's interest.According to the leaflet – which has since been taken down – "the EOS Ra is a version of the EOS R designed for astrophotography".Since then, though, we've barely heard anything about the EOS Ra, but reliable camera rumors site Nokishita has tweeted that the astrophotography-focused camera has been added to Canon's product list and is "probably the next camera to be announced".If this rumor turns out to be true, this will be the first specialized camera from Canon since 2012, and the first full-frame mirrorless model ever specialized for astrophotography.The older cameras that were designed for astrophotography were DSLR variants of existing Canon snappers – the difference is that they had their infrared-blocking dielectric mirror (also called a 'hot mirror') removed to make it more sensitive to hydrogen-alpha light (the wavelength of light emitted by stars and needed to produce high quality astro images).The EOS 20Da (a variant of the EOS 20D) was announced in 2005, but has since been replaced by the EOS 60a (a spin on the EOS 60D) which was announced in 2012.
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