Leon Rhodes

Leon Rhodes

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Following 35
UK
Some 3 million years ago, a tiny mouse featuring reddish fur on its back and a white belly scurried across the landscape of what is now Germany.We know this thanks to a remarkable new breakthrough in which reddish colour pigment was detected in an ancient fossil—a scientific first.Fossils with traces of soft tissue are exceptionally rare, making it difficult—if not impossible—for scientists to determine the colour of a specimen, the texture of its skin, and other important cosmetic and functional characteristics.New research published Tuesday in Nature Communications describes a new technique in which scientists, for the very first time, were able to detect reddish color pigment in a 3 million year old mouse fossil.Using x-ray spectrography, chemical imaging, and other techniques, researchers from the University of Manchester and several other institutions showed that the extinct field mouse had reddish to brown fur on its back and a white belly.We can reconstruct key facets from life, death and the subsequent events impacting preservation before and after burial,” said Phil Manning, the lead palaeontologist on the paper and a professor at UM, in a press release.
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Mainly, we're hoping Nintendo will offer more solid details on titles which have already been announced such as Pokémon Sword and Shield, Link's Awakening Remake and Luigi's Mansion 3 - not to mention Animal Crossing on the Switch.If we're being really optimistic, there could even be news about the new Nintendo Switch – but it's not super likely given the lack of concrete rumors.Keep up to date with all the latest E3 2019 newsNintendo has already announced that Pokémon Sword and Shield will be hitting the Nintendo Switch in late 2019, with the next generation of Pokémon games seeing players traversing the brand new region of Galar (based on Britain).While we already know the new core Pokémon games will bring with them fresh Pokémon to train, we don't know much about these outside of the starter options.We also don't know much about the game's new features (or which will be making a return) or how Sword and Shield will differ, if at all.
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Wikipedia is taking Turkey to the European Court of Human Rights as it seeks to overturn a blanket ban on its website in the country.The Wikimedia Foundation, the charity behind the online encyclopaedia, said it has filed an application with the Strasbourg court in a bid to lift the block, which was established more than two years ago.Read more: Turkish lira falls to eight-month lowWikipedia said the ban violates fundamental freedoms, including the right to freedom of expression, which is guaranteed under the European Convention.The application, which was announced today during a press call, comes after Wikipedia’s “continued and exhaustive” attempts to overturn the ban in Turkish courts failed to bear fruit.“Wikipedia is a global resource that everyone can be actively part of shaping,” said Katherine Maher, Wikimedia executive director.
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An iPhone's Photos app makes it easy to hide photos or videos on your iPhone by removing it from your main albums and tucking it away in an obscure folder.You can also use the Notes app to create media files you can secure with a password, ensuring no one can get to the image (or other file type) without your assistance.There is another clever way to keep an image on your iPhone readily available to you, but hidden to others: text messages.Maybe you're going to have a great shot of the kids framed as an anniversary gift for the wife, or you took an image of the secret birthday gift list for your husband.Whatever your reasons for wanting to hide photos on your iPhone may be, that's your concern.How to hide pictures on iPhone with the Photos app
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What I've mostly discerned is this: It's a show about sex and dragons and dragon sex (I'm actually not sure about the latter, but if I'm being honest—and I always strive to be—that'd be incredibly cool); Peter Dinklage has a role on it; there was a very-hard-to-see (literally) battle at night where the Night King (the blue-faced Darth Maul-looking dude) died; no one is quite sure what is west of Westeros (LOL); there are a ton of badass women rulers; some guy named John (Jon?Jason Parham is a senior writer for WIRED.One thing I can say with absolute, irrefutable certainty: Game of Thrones, like most sweeping TV experiments born of the prestige era, was fated for a doomed endpoint.Expectations are like organic sesame rice cakes—good in theory but seldom nourishing.History is a formidable teacher: The Sopranos ended in a confusing blink and The Wire's last season proved its most bizarre.Today, fandom is fueled by our most influential hysteria machines (not counting Fox News): Twitter, Reddit, YouTube.
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Las Vegas has tapped Elon Musk's Boring Company to build a one-mile tunnel underneath its downtown convention center.The tunnel will connect one end of the building to the other, at a cost of $48 million, the city's convention and visitor's authority said in a press release.Transit experts have criticized the Boring Company's plans for traffic mitigation as less-than-innovative.Details for the contract include three underground passenger stations, a pedestrian tunnel and two vehicular tubes, which will all be outfitted with escalator access, lighting, WiFi coverage, cell phone data, and video surveillance systems."Las Vegas will continue to elevate the experience of our visitors with innovation, such as with this project, and by focusing on the current and future needs of our guests," Steve Hill, LVCVA CEO and president, said in a press release.Boring Co Eventually, the Boring Company proposes, the tunnels could stretch beyond the convention center, to connect the Casino-lined Strip and to the airport at speeds of 155 miles per hour.
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Researchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia presented at ICRA 2019 - the International Conference on Robotics and Automation held in Montreal (Canada), the most recent results about the new version of the hydraulic quadruped robot HyQ, HyQReal.The HyQReal robot is developed to support humans in emergency scenarios.HyQReal is 1,33 m long and 90 cm tall, and its weight is 130kg considering hydraulics and batteries onboard.The robot is protected by an aluminium roll cage and a skin made of Kevlar, glass fiber and plastic.The new features have been tested in Genova Airport, in Genoa (Italy), with the support of Piaggio Aerospace, demonstrating the power of HyQReal by pulling a small passenger airplane (Piaggio P180 Avanti), 3300kg weight, 14.4m long, with a wingspan of 14m.The long-term goal of the project is to create the hardware, software and algorithms for robust quadruped vehicles for rough terrain that can be tailored to a variety of applications, such as disaster response, agriculture, decommissioning, and inspection.
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Compared to the $900 Galaxy S10 and the pricier $1,980 Galaxy Fold (which doesn't yet have an official release date thanks to screen issues), the Galaxy S10E is the cheapest out of the group.And while it doesn't feel as luxurious as the iPhone XR, its small size is comfortable to hold.The phone also has a higher resolution and a greater pixel density than the iPhone XR, but you really can't discern much of a difference unless you hold the phones side-by-side.These days, however, an absence of a headphone jack isn't considered much of a deal breaker; indeed preferring the beloved but endangered headphone jack may just be delaying the inevitable as more and more phone makers decide to lop it off their handsets.Finally, the iPhone XR and Galaxy S10E are rated IP67 and IP68, respectively, for water resistance.Subjects also look sharper and the dynamic range appears to be wider.
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Actually, I step into the lobby only on my third go-around: I walked past Forward twice because its entrance to the Glendale location is just as glossy and polished as every other building in the Americana at Brand shopping center.Instead, in Forward's "front of house," members check themselves in on tablets, where initials pop up according to what appointments are in queue.Forward Health considers itself the doctor's office of the future, where tech and medicine meet to create a seamless, collaborative primary care experience.What did I think was the absolute coolest feature out of everything I experienced at Forward?"I've had patients come in for appointments and cry because it's such a powerful experience for them," Favini told CNET.The app is compatible with anything that connects to Apple Health, including the Motiv Ring, MisFit Ray, Omron Evolv, AliveCor Kardia, Withings smart scales and many others.
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The US government, courtesy of an executive order from President Donald Trump, has blacklisted Huawei from buying from or selling to US companies.That has caused Google, Qualcomm, and ARM to withdraw support from the Chinese manufacturer, three companies that have a mutually beneficial relationship with Huawei.It has gotten a temporary and short reprieve but, unless the situation changes, the hammer will fall again.Disregarding political and economic considerations, the effects of this ban won’t just cause headaches for Huawei, it could also throw the Android world into disarray.Selling more phones means Huawei also buys more components and pays for more licenses, among other things.While it’s inconceivable that Huawei will stop making smartphones the way ZTE almost did, a nosedive in its production will hurt even the likes of Google and Qualcomm, even if not as much as Huawei.
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John Goodenough, a University of Texas at Austin professor in the J. Mike Walker Department of Mechanical Engineering in the Cockrell School of Engineering, has won the Royal Society of London's Copley Medal, the world's oldest scientific prize.Already a fellow of the Royal Society, Goodenough has been honored for his exceptional contributions to materials science, including his discoveries that led to the invention of the rechargeable lithium battery used in devices such as laptops and smartphones worldwide.The Royal Society first awarded the Copley Medal in 1731 -- 170 years before the first Nobel Prize -- and gives it annually for outstanding achievements in scientific research.As the 2019 recipient, Goodenough joins an elite group of past awardees including Benjamin Franklin, Charles Darwin, Louis Pasteur, Albert Einstein and Dorothy Hodgkin."Professor Goodenough has a rich legacy of contributions to materials science in both a fundamental capacity, with his defining work on the properties of magnetism, to a widely applicable one, with his ever-advancing work on batteries, including those powering the smartphone in your very pocket," said Venki Ramakrishnan, president of the Royal Society."The Royal Society is delighted to recognize his achievements with the Copley Medal, our most prestigious prize."
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Amazon is clearly edging ever closer to the day when it can replace its warehouse workers with robots, but until then it needs to make sure those workers operate as efficiently as possible so that it can streamline its operation and ensure its online shoppers receive their orders in a timely fashion.One way Amazon is doing this is by allowing its warehouse staff to play games while they work.The games have been specially designed to increase productivity by encouraging competition among workers.According to a Washington Post report this week, hundreds of pickers and packers at Amazon warehouses “spend hours a day playing video games,” with some competing “by racing virtual dragons or sports cars around a track, while others collaborate to build castles piece by piece.” The offerings include Amazon-made titles such as MissionRacer, PicksInSpace, and Dragon Duel.The games, whose graphics and gameplay are described as being a bit on the clunky side, are currently offered at five Amazon warehouses, including in its home city of Seattle, Washington, and Manchester, England.Employees can choose whether or not to play the games, which are displayed on screens attached to workstations.
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WikiLeaks editor in chief Kristinn Hrafnsson has issued a warning that any information recovered by U.S. authorities from Julian Assange’s devices – seized following his expulsion from London’s Ecuadorian embassy in April – is likely to be tampered with, claiming that chain-of-custody procedures have already been violated.Hrafnsson, in an interview with the Associated Press this week, said there was no way to guarantee the devices hadn’t been tampered with in the six weeks since his arrest.“If anything surfaces, I can assure you it would’ve been planted,” he told the news agency, adding that “protections” had been in place for “a very long time.”“Julian isn’t a novice when it comes to security and securing his information,” he said.The remarks came as news broke that Ecuadorian authorities had catalogued the WikiLeaks founder’s personal belongings, including electronic devices containing data as-of-yet undisclosed.Per WikiLeaks, the cache of documents includes medical records, legal papers, and two manuscripts, in addition to electronic equipment.
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Remove this ad space by subscribing.Taxi operator ComfortDelGro will test a self-driving shuttle bus at the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Kent Ridge campus starting this Saturday, although trials with passengers will start in the third quarter this year, Channel News Asia reports.“The key purpose of the road test is to ‘map’ the route through the collection of data for the vehicle’s navigation systems,” said a news release issued on Thursday.The vehicle is based on EasyMile’s autonomous technology, and is funded by car dealership chain Inchcape in Singapore.
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The idea of jumping into a self-piloting flying taxi for a trip downtown sounded like the stuff of fantasy only a few years ago, but with so many companies now developing such a vehicle, it’s hard not to believe it’ll soon be a thing.And no, we’re not talking about some crackpot glueing a pair of wings onto an old banger and hoping for the best.We’re talking the likes of Airbus, Uber, and Toyota-backed Joby, all of whom are working on their own projects with the very same goal.Airbus’s single-passenger Vahana Alpha, for example, is an autonomous vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft that’s already been several years in development.The Vahana Alpha One prototype took its first full-scale flight test in early 2018, and has since gone on to make well over 50 more.This week the Pendleton, Oregon-based team offered a tantalizing first glimpse of the Alpha Two, its second full-scale demonstrator aircraft and the first to feature a finished interior.
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You probably won't ever get to go to space – but your name canIt will be engraving millions of names onto a tiny silicon chip by using an electron beam over a ready-made stencil and booting it off to the Red Planet onboard its Mars 2020 rover.Any extraterrestrial life will have a hard time trying to read the ruddy thing thought because all the text is smaller than 75 nanometers, less than one-thousandth the width of a human hair.“As we get ready to launch this historic Mars mission, we want everyone to share in this journey of exploration," said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate."It’s an exciting time for NASA, as we embark on this voyage to answer profound questions about our neighboring planet, and even the origins of life itself.”It has invited members of the public to submit their first and last names, their country of residence, postal codes and email addresses.
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Before NASA's Osiris-Rex spacecraft can reach out and grab a piece of asteroid Bennu, it needs to find a safe spot on the space rock's surface.And for that, NASA wants your help.Osiris-Rex, which arrived at Bennu on Dec. 3, 2018, aims to become the first US spacecraft to return a sample from an asteroid to Earth.Japan's Hayabusa mission brought back asteroid particles in 2010, with another asteroid-wrangling mission out of Japan under way this year.Since the NASA craft arrived at Bennu, the team has discovered an extremely rocky terrain that threatens the vehicle's safety."We ask for citizen scientists' help to evaluate this rugged terrain so that we can keep our spacecraft safe during sample collection operations."
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Chinese tech giant Huawei may have its own smartphone and laptop operating system ready for its Chinese customers by fall of this year, CNBC reports, citing a high-level exec.Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer business, added that an international version of the operating system may follow by the first or second quarter of 2020.Huawei was recently placed on a blacklist that restricted it from dealing with any US firm, resulting in the telecom company not having access to a licensed version of Google’s Android along with its services.
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TVs are no longer what they were just a few years ago.Never mind how some have become so thin that they almost disappear into walls, they’ve also become so intelligent they could become the hub of modern smart homes.Many of them, however, can’t do it alone and require the help of some AI assistant.That’s why LG is rolling out support for Amazon Alexa to its 2019 TVs under its AI ThinQ smart brand.LG has mostly been cozying up to Google by putting Google Assistant in its smart products, from smartphones to smart appliances.Under its new “ThinQ” umbrella brand, however, it has started to open up its ecosystem to more players, including Amazon.
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Game of Thrones was an epic ride.For eight seasons, HBO treated viewers to some of the best acting and storytelling on television.It all concluded, with a bang, on Sunday.While we all agree that it was a magical journey to get us to season eight in the first place, it’s here where two camps begin to form: some who believe the finale was a solid conclusion, and others who, well, don’t.The latter camp has even gone so far as to collect nearly 1.5 million signatures in hopes that HBO will reshoot the final season.One fan though, rose above the bickering, creating an ending that he felt we deserved — complete with the signature stylings of 1980s filmmaker John Hughes.
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