Marion Kimberlin

Marion Kimberlin

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Xiaomi has released MIUI 12 updates for its three smartphones: Mi 8 Pro, Mi 8 Lite and Mi Max 3. All three received a stable ... The post Xiaomi Mi 8 Pro, Mi 8 Lite and Mi Max 3 has received MIUI 12 update appeared first on Gizchina.com.
  Sony's WH-1000XM4 headphones are among the best wireless noise-cancelling headphones you can get in the $350 price range. They have excellent noise cancellation, phone call quality that cuts out a tremendous amount of ambient noise, great battery life, and amazing audio performance.  If you're not satisfied by the way they sound out of the box, you can use Sony's Headphones app to tweak them. It's worth doing, because you can get better sound than the historical gold standard in wireless noise-cancelling headphones — the $400 Bose 700.  If you're looking at wireless noise-cancelling headphones, chances are you're also looking at the Bose 700. If so, check out our direct comparison between the Sony WH-1000XM4 and the Bose 700.  Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky Right off the bat, the Sony WH-1000XM4 wireless noise-cancelling headphones should be serious contenders for your head and ears. Indeed, "wireless" and "noise cancelling" have been popular criteria, and Sony gets these two aspects absolutely right. You're also getting great sound quality that you can refine to your liking by using the Sony Headphones app, and you might even like them more than the historical gold standard in wireless noise-cancelling headphones — the $400 Bose 700.  If $350 is in your budget for wireless noise-cancelling headphones, the XM4 should absolutely be high up in your shortlist, but make sure to read the full review below to ensure they're for you. Specifications Drivers: 40mm dome Connectivity: Bluetooth, NFC, 3.5mm jack, USB Type-C charging Codecs: LDAC, DSEE Battery Life: 30 hours App: Sony Headphones for iOS and Android Comfort and design The XM4 are very comfortable headphones. The earcups covered in smooth leatherette are plush and don't grip onto my head, but they're just tight and lightweight enough that the headphones stay on while tilting and turning my head in every direction. For reference, my head around my brow and tips of my ears measure in at about 23 inches. The headband is made of something firmer, but also covered in smooth leatherette, and it doesn't apply too much pressure, nor does the top of my head get sore after long periods of listening.  Design-wise, the XM4 are pretty neutral and modern looking. Their matte plastic exterior is available in black and "silver," which looks more like a kind of light tan or gray beige. You could make the argument that there should be more metal for a pair of $350 headphones, but metal would probably add more weight, and it wouldn't really add much more to their premium feel. Sound quality What's objective and definitive is that the XM4 gets the basics right — they have a very rich sound and a good, fairly wide soundstage. Sony also boasts that it collaborated with Sony Music Studios Tokyo for the sound quality of the XM4s. To be honest, I'm not the right person to tell you how much that counts for, but I thought I'd mention it.  Outside of that, it's hard for me to tell you whether these sound good or not, because everyone hears differently and everyone has a preference to how their music sounds. And that happens to be an area where the XM4s shine. Their sound is customizable via the Sony Headphones app, and you can change the sound to however you want it to be. Customizing sound through equalizer (EQ) settings isn't new, it's just particularly effective with Sony's app and the XM4 headphones.  Thank goodness the XM4s are customizable, because their out-of-the-box sound isn't my favorite. In their default state, the XM4s have big, powerful sound that leans heavily towards bass and doesn't give very much attention to higher frequencies, which leads to a muffled sound that frankly isn't very impressive. If you like clarity and a better balance that features a little more treble and highs, the XM4 won't be for you, and you'll want to go into the Sony Headphones app to customize the sound.  So that's what I did, and I found an adjustment that makes my music sound amazing to me, and it was pretty easy and quick. In fact, my own customization turned the XM4 into a pair of headphones that are going to be hard to replace. It was worth going into the app and playing around with the sound settings, as I prefer the way the XM4 sound compared to the Bose. (If you're curious, I use the "Bright" preset, and set the "Clear Bass" to +5 or more.)  Some don't really care too much and just want a pair of headphones that they're told sound good without fiddling around in an app, and for those people, I'd suggest the $400 Bose 700 that can often be had for less. They offer excellent sound out of the box. Noise cancellation and battery life Noise cancellation on the XM4 is excellent and on par with Bose, which have set the standard for noise-cancelling wireless headphones with the Quiet Comfort line, and most recently its 700 line.  In an office-type environment at about 53 decibels, including air conditioning droning and a couple of loud fans, I could listen to music at significantly lower volumes than without noise cancelling. The ambient noise from the air conditioning and fans, and even the sound of my wife on a phone call in the same room was all but forgotten while listening to music.  Without music, some higher frequency fan noise was still audible, but the XM4 made the room significantly quieter and more comfortable to work in. I could also still hear my wife's phone conversation, but again, it was totally tolerable, and I could still easily work comfortably without feeling distracted.  I even tested the XM4 next to my home's 10KW backup power generator, which produces between 65 and 85 decibels — a range that decently represents a Midtown Manhattan avenue. The XM4 did remarkably well at cancelling out the generator's noise considering my proximity to the generator, and that the noise was coming exclusively from one source rather than the "everywhere" nature of noise in Manhattan. In a sentence, the XM4 will absolutely make subway and walking commutes in busy cities significantly more tolerable and comfortable.  As for battery life, Sony touts an impressive 30 hours, and five hours of listening time from a quick 10-minute top-off charge with 1.5A or more adapter. All in all, battery life in real life is great — it never felt as if I was constantly charging the XM4.  Phone calls Sony has worked to improve the ambient noise reduction during phone calls, and that work paid off. I had a phone conversation at around the 65-75 decibel range (near my generator), and the person I was speaking with said, for the most part, they wouldn't know I was next to a noisy engine that produces 10,000 watts of power at 240 volts.  Basically, that means you can walk around a city's busy streets and have a comfortable conversation with barely any city noise making its way into the phone call.   That brings the XM4s up to the Bose 700 region for phone call performance, which is saying something. The Bose 700 were a revelation for ambient noise control for phone calls.  Apps and other features The Sony Headphones app is utilitarian but necessary to customize the sound to your liking, and while it was quick and easy for me, I see plenty of room for improvement to make it more intuitive and more attractive, especially for those who are less inclined on tech. Sony has loaded the XM4s with one feature that's incredibly important for a pair of wireless headphones in 2020 and beyond, as well as a bunch of features that aren't entirely necessary, even questionable.  First, the important feature the XM4s include is Bluetooth multipoint technology, which lets you connect to two devices at the same time. Multipoint is essential if you often switch between your phone and computer — you can listen to music from your computer with the headphones, as well as pick up a phone call from your phone without any manual switching.  Another feature that works well is "Quick Attention," which reduces your music's volume and turns off noise cancelling when you place your hand over the right earcup. That's great when you need to communicate with someone briefly, like when you're buying something. Volume and noise cancellation come right back when you remove your hand from the right earcup. I'd still think I'm being rude if I kept my headphones on while communicating with another human being, but at least the motion of putting your hand to the earcup is an indication that you're doing something to pay attention to them.  There's also "Speak To Chat," where the headphones detect when you're talking, and music and noise cancellation are totally turned off. When the headphones detect that you're no longer talking, music and noise cancellation are re-engaged after a set amount of time. It works well, but if I'm going to chat with anyone for more than a brief amount of time, I'm going to take off the headphones. If it's not obvious, this is one of the questionable features.   The Sony app includes a noise cancellation optimizer designed to, well, optimize noise cancellation for you by analyzing anything that might alter the earcups' seal around your ears. I'm not entirely sure if it works, to be honest, but optimized or not, sound quality and noise cancellation remain excellent. There's also a "360 Reality Audio" feature that supposedly enhances audio with some kind of surround sound enhancements. The setup process is odd, as you need to take photos of your ears, and it only works with the Tidal, Nugs, and Deezer streaming apps. I don't use any of these apps, so I couldn't test this feature. Honestly, these kinds of features rarely end up enhancing anything for the better.  Should you buy the Sony WH-1000XM4? Yep! I could leave it at that, but I need to disclose that the XM4s work best if you use the Sony Headphones app. Maybe you'll like the default sound, but I find it lackluster. After a little effortless tweaking, the XM4 became one of my favorite pairs of all-around headphones — you're getting some of the best sound quality, comfort, noise cancellation, and phone call quality in the $350 price range.  If $350 is on the higher side, you could still pick up Sony's previous generation in the XM series, the WH-1000XM3. Sound quality, noise cancellation, and comfort are all just a hair under the new XM4, but for the sub-$250 price tags we're seeing these days for the XM3, they're a bargain. To note, the XM3s would also benefit from some minor finagling with the app to get the sound you like. See what we said about the XM3 headphones around the time they were released.  If you're truly not interested in playing around with an app and you "just want a good pair of headphones," I'd recommend the Bose 700 instead. You can check out the Bose 700 review here.  Pros: Comfortable, long battery life, excellent noise cancellation, great audio quality, incredibly effective sound customization, impressive ambient noise reduction for phone calls Cons: Default sound is muffled and lacks highs and clarity, app is utilitarian and not super intuitive  Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
As the US presidential election nears, many companies are detailing the measures they’ve taken to prevent their platforms from being used as a tool to manipulate the public and interfere in politics. YouTube is the latest among them, revealing the steps it is taking to address the potential abuse of its streaming platform as a means for election interference. Which … Continue reading
Amazon reportedly told multiple podcasters in an email that the company was considering launching podcasts on its Amazon Music and Audible services. However, the company told the producers that it will only give them a platform if they don't talk badly about Amazon. One podcaster who received the email tweeted about the "content restriction," writing that "signing up requires signing away your journalistic integrity." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Amazon reportedly communicated to multiple podcasters in an email its plans to launch podcasts on its Amazon Music and Audible streaming services, per a report from Billboard. But one stipulation of the deal is that podcasters "may not include advertising or messages that disparage or are directed against Amazon or any Service." As Pitchfork noted, one of the podcasters that Amazon emailed was Corey Quinn, the host of the AWS Morning Brief and Screaming in the Cloud podcasts. Quinn tweeted Monday night about the Amazon email, writing in part, "I'm a freaking entertainment podcast and I can't consent to that. How can any actual news podcast?!" He also wrote "signing up requires signing away your journalistic integrity." That's a standard flub, but here's where it really goes off the rails: the terms and conditions specify that podcasts will not disparage @Amazon in any way.I'm a freaking entertainment podcast and I can't consent to that. How can any actual news podcast?! pic.twitter.com/QlE23KdAv7 — HydroxyCoreyQuinn (@QuinnyPig) August 11, 2020 Amazon did not immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment. Rival streaming service Spotify has made strides into the podcasting world as of late, with a multi-year licensing deal with Joe Rogan and its acquisitions of The Ringer, Gimlet Media, and Anchor. The company also struck a deal with Kim Kardashian West for an exclusive podcast that will feature the celebrity and entrepreneur's work with the Innocence Project. Both Apple and Google also offer podcasts as part of their streaming services.SEE ALSO: Musicians are coming after Jeff Bezos over copyright concerns after the Amazon CEO told Congress he's not sure if Twitch pays royalties Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why thoroughbred horse semen is the world's most expensive liquid
(Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) Using highly complex analytical techniques, a group of researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin were able to observe in detail how different metals are released from joint implants and accumulate in the surrounding bone tissue. Findings showed a steady release of metals from various implant components. In contrast to previous assumptions, this was not related to the degree of mechanical stress involved.
TLDR: The Complete Digital Marketing Growth Hacking Certification Bundle offers insight into dozens of strategies for finding and converting customers online. From search engine optimization (SEO) to content marketing, from social media advertising and engagement to email campaigns and affiliate plays, there are nearly as many avenues to digitally market online as there are sellers marketing. And while one method may serve a particular seller better than others, there’s never a one-size-fits-all answer to assembling a digital marketing plan. In fact, the reality is it will almost always take a combination of many approaches to build to the web audience… This story continues at The Next Web
The company argues it needs to review each and every game before users play them
I really need to upgrade my brain's internal storage.I'm only partially kidding: Just like a hard drive, I'm pretty sure my mind reached maximum capacity at some point in the past decade. The only way I can remember anything these days is by making and maintaining a million notes, both physical and digital. (My wife can confirm this: "I told you that a week ago" is an all-too-common phrase 'round these parts.)I'm still waiting for Western Digital to start selling SSD implants for the noggin, but in the meantime, Google Keep has become my repository for notes of the non-sticky variety. I like it because it's simple to use and yet packed with features that make my life easier on both a professional and a personal level. Plus, it works as well on my desktop computer or Chromebook as it does on my Android phone — and I can seamlessly move from one device to the next and know all my notes will always be synced, current, and available wherever I need 'em.To read this article in full, please click here
Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge Uber is continuing to bleed cash during the coronavirus pandemic. The chronically unprofitable company lost $1.8 billion over the last three months, with its adjusted net revenues down 29 percent compared to Q2 of 2019. Even Uber’s successful delivery business, which saw revenues grow 162 percent year over year, wasn’t enough to buoy the company’s finances. Gross bookings in its ride-hailing division, or the amount of money it takes in before paying drivers, fell 73 percent year over year. It’s a slight improvement over the first quarter, in which Uber’s ride-hailing business was down 80 percent. But there was no mistaking the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the company’s core transportation business. Meanwhile, gross bookings in... Continue reading…
Final Fantasy VII Remake has held fairly steady at $60 since it launched in April 2020, but the disc-based version for PS4 is currently down to $40 at Amazon, Best Buy, Walmart, and Target. My colleague Andrew Webster called it a “thrilling, thoughtful take on a classic” in his review. In case you weren’t aware, the FF7R covers the first portion of the game in Midgar. That section isn’t too long in the original title, but Square Enix completely reimagined the world and fleshed it out with more quests, a new battle system, and some slight changes to the story. Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge Google’s Pixel 4A is its latest midrange Android phone, but you can get the Pixel 3A XL released in 2019 for $250 at Woot. It... Continue reading…
Twitter has disclosed the discovery of a security bug that impacted only a small percentage of users, according to a brief note detailing the matter. According to the company, it has already fixed the bug, as expected, one that potentially left some private messages exposed to malicious actors who may have been aware of how to exploit the security issue. … Continue reading
The telehealth giant Teladoc is acquiring Livongo, a chronic-care company, in an $18.5 billion deal. It's the biggest deal that digital health has ever seen, several analysts told Business Insider. More importantly, it could change the future of healthcare by combining patients' coaching, physicians, prescriptions, and data under one umbrella for tens of millions of patients. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Two of the biggest digital health companies are combining in a record-breaking deal for the industry, in a transaction that one analyst said could prove to be more significant than the oft-touted ambitions of tech giants like Amazon. Teladoc Health, a giant telehealth company, agreed on Wednesday to acquire Livongo Health in an $18.5 billion deal. Livongo delivers online care for chronic conditions, and helps more than 410,000 patients manage their diabetes. The deal "truly transforms and digitizes healthcare," said David Larsen, an analyst at Verity Research. "While Amazon and other large entities in industry have talked about wanting to revolutionize healthcare, and lower its costs while improving value, this deal will actually deliver on that objective." The deal eclipses previous digital health transactions, like Amazon's purchase of online pharmacy PillPack, and Google's $2.1 billion bid for FitBit, said Forrester's Arielle Trzcinski. In fact, the next-largest deal falls short by roughly $7.5 billion, according to Stephanie Davis, an analyst at SVB Leerink. That was last month, when MultiPlan went public in an $11 billion transaction with investment company Churchill Capital. It's a testament to the many ways in which the coronavirus pandemic made healthcare more digital. Clinical trials are being conducted over iPhones. Hospitals are doing more things online with help from Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. Roughly 43% of patients worldwide have tried telehealth, with most saying they want to keep using the technology in the future.  Read more: We spoke to Amazon, Microsoft, Google, and 9 top healthcare leaders. They all said coronavirus is creating a new and permanent foothold for tech giants in the $3.6 trillion industry. Coronavirus-related demand has boosted both Teladoc and Livongo, recent earnings reports show. Year over year, their quarterly revenues grew by 85% and 125%, respectively. The deal announced on Wednesday is made up of cash and stock: for each Livongo share, Teladoc is paying $11.33 and 0.5920 Teladoc shares. The transaction is slated to close by the end of the year, the announcement said. Teladoc, which works with 70 million patients in the US alone, didn't have much in the way of chronic care management. Instead, it typically does one-off visits to help patients who are sick or who want a skin condition examined, for example. Through combining with Livongo, the idea is to create a single online source for almost any medical need, Jason Gorevic, the CEO of Teladoc, told Business Insider. Gorevic will be CEO of the combined firm after the deal closes. The companies will also collect and analyze data based on technology developed by Livongo that can help the two companies chart out care plans for individuals and render bigger insights about healthcare, they told BI. "The time is now for this combination," Gorevic said. "The adoption curve of virtual care and the maturity curve of virtual care have accelerated by several years during this pandemic." Livongo, meanwhile, could help patients monitor their health and provide coaching, but generally didn't connect them with doctors, said Dr. Jennifer Scheider, Livongo's president. "This allows us to give that step therapy through partnership at a scale that's very different from the other telehealth vendors, because of the tremendous number of lives the Teladoc has covered," she said.  Some investors are wary of the sticker price At $18.5 billion — and with Livongo's stock up more than 330% year to date as of Tuesday — Wall Street winced at the sticker price Teladoc is paying for a program it probably could have built internally for much less money, Jared Holz, a healthcare analyst at Jefferies, told Business Insider. The telehealth giant's stock was down 15% on news of the merger as of Wednesday afternoon, likely for that reason, Holz said. While it's a good move for Teladoc, making it a global healthcare power player, valuations of both companies are likely inflated, he said.  "To put capital to work with a stock at an all time high is probably not that surprising," Holz said. "I think what's surprising is they decided to buy another company with a similar, potentially stretched valuation to begin with." Plus the deal price represents a 10% premium on Livongo's prior close, leading to market pushback, SVB Leerink's Davis wrote in a note to investors.  However, she noted that consolidating these options for online care makes sense for all involved, from employers looking for holistic health plans to end-users who'd prefer one app instead of several.  On the other hand, bigger can be better The acquisition of Livongo makes Teladoc roughly nine times the size of its next closest competitor, Sean Dodge, a healthcare analyst at RBC Capital Markets, told Business Insider.  That gives Teladoc more tools for what's still a growing opportunity in virtual health, he said. Despite the boost from the pandemic, only a small fraction of care is carried out online, even though up to half of it could be, per RBC's estimates.  The merger also expands Teladoc's focus away from just urgent medical needs, he said. Some of the company's core business prior to this included working with health systems to help them care for patients, and treating mental health, hypertension, and lower back pain, Teladoc's Gorevic said. But chronic conditions can cost the US $1.1 trillion each year, the equivalent of 6% of GDP, a 2016 report by the Milken Institute showed. That's a big part of the healthcare pie that's gone unaddressed by big telehealth vendors, but an area that Livongo specializes in. "This lets them now address the people that are really sick and are big spenders of healthcare dollars," Dodge said.  'This combined platform truly gives the entire world a digital healthcare solution' The disjointed nature of the US healthcare system probably can't be overstated, and it extends to care that's delivered online. Patients can be using one app for their mental health, another for their diabetes, and another for urgent care needs, all with differing reimbursement from their health plans.  In the new arrangement with Teladoc and Livongo, things could be different. Members could be passed from coaches to physicians as needed, get access to their own primary care physician, and have prescriptions written for them all in the same Teladoc-organized network, according to Larsen at Verity Research. That's more disruptive than Amazon and other large entities that have only talked about revolutionizing healthcare, he wrote in a research note on Wednesday. "And this combined platform truly gives the entire world a digital healthcare solution," Larsen said.Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Why American sunscreens may not be protecting you as much as European sunscreens
Netflix is on the verge of acquiring a new movie from Disney’s 20th Century Studios, a report claims, a transaction that would see the thriller debut on Netflix’s own platform. Called The Woman in the Window, the movie directed by Joe Wright stars Amy Adams — and it is, sadly, the last book adaptation from the Fox 2000 division Disney … Continue reading
Photo by Christian Charisius/picture alliance via Getty Images In-flight Wi-Fi provider Gogo is laying off 143 people, or about 14 percent of its workforce, as people continue to avoid air travel during the COVID-19 pandemic. The company previously furloughed 600 workers and cut executive pay in April, and said Thursday that it will “continue certain furloughs and maintain the salary reductions that were previously implemented.” The cuts will come “predominantly from the Company’s Commercial Aviation business,” according to a press release issued Thursday. Gogo applied for CARES Act funding, but it’s unclear if it ever received any assistance. “Based on our current expectations of the scope and timing of a recovery in the industry and our Commercial Aviation business, reducing our workforce has... Continue reading…
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