Mark Moore

Mark Moore

Followers 30
Following 31
US
Cutting through the competitive chaos can be a difficult task, and while Three UK is focusing on convergence and broadband, Three Denmark is making a play to manage the consumers wallet.With mobile services becoming increasingly utilitised the telcos need to search for a new way to stay relevant and add value to the consumer.Some are diversifying into alternative connectivity services or content, but other are broadening their wings outside the traditional realms of telecommunications.“It can be difficult to keep track of how many different small amounts you are allowed to spend on apps, movies and games – or how much you get used during a month,” said David Elsass of Three Denmark.“Therefore, many of our customers, both with and without children, have sought greater overview.”Many telcos have created a very unique position of trust with the consumer.
US
On March 15, young people around the world walked out of school and into the streets.From San Francisco to South Africa, an estimated 1.4 million students raised their collective voices to bring awareness to the urgency of climate change.It was the largest ever global action against the harms of climate change, and it was pulled off entirely by children.A teenager named Greta Thunberg inspired the strike, and kids across the globe heeded her call, organizing strikes in their home towns, and showing up.The message of the global climate strikes were clear: The youth will have to live on a climate-ravaged Earth, and so it is their voices that must be heard.In that spirit, WIRED hired two teenage photographers to cover the climate strikes in the US from their perspective: In Atlanta, 17-year-old Henry W. Grady High School senior Esme Bella Rice photographed the strike in front of the Georgia State Capitol building; and in San Francisco, 18-year-old Ruth Asawa School of the Arts senior Max Buenviaje-Boyd photographed the large march from the Federal Building, through downtown, to Union Square.
US
WEST HAVEN, Conn., March 18, 2019 - University of New Haven chemistry professor Chong Qiu, Ph.D., has been awarded a five-year, almost $700,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Award for his groundbreaking research on aerosols - tiny particles suspended in the air - in the atmosphere.Qiu will use the funding to advance his research that has the potential to shape understanding of the impact of air quality on climate change, weather forecasting, and human health."National Science Foundation Early Career Awards are coveted by the very best faculty at the very best universities," said Ron Harichandran, Ph.D., dean of the University's Tagliatela College of Engineering, noting that Qiu's fellow recipients of NSF's early career award this year are professors at Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard and NYU.Qiu's research is investigating chemicals, such as amines - nitrogen-containing organic compounds that are derived from ammonia - that Qiu said were previously thought not to have a significant impact on the atmosphere."We recently discovered that reactions of amines play an important role in the formation and transformation of atmospheric aerosols," Qiu said.For the past two years, Qiu has worked with undergraduate and graduate students on this research.
US
In what could either be a clever tease or an inadvertent mistake, jump pads are starting to appear across Kings Canyon in Apex Legends, particularly in the Market area of the map.This has led many users on Reddit to speculate that the next legend, thought to be Octane, will arrive in the coming days.Octane’s Ultimate lets them deploy jump pads on the map that launch players into the sky, according to a leaked screenshot shared on Reddit earlier this month.How they wound up on the map is a mystery, but it seems likely developer Respawn is doing a Fortnite-style tease, slowly introducing new elements into the world to create excitement.Numerous Reddit posts showcasing the jump pads have more than 1,000 replies.To add to the curiosity, Respawn developers have joined a few of the threads, offering various coy responses such as the smirking emoji.
UK
The final season of Game of Thrones might be the shortest one to date with only 6 episodes, but don’t let that get you down.We’re learning today that most of the episodes in season 8 will run longer than the typical hour we’re used to setting aside, so even though this is the shortest season in terms of episode count, there’s still going to be plenty of content to watch.HBO revealed the length of all 6 episodes in the final season today.The first two clock in at lengths we more or less expect out of Game of Thrones at 54 minutes long and 58 minutes long, respectively.Once we hit episode 3, though, they start getting significantly longer.Have a look at the full list of episodes and their running times below:
US
Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) today introduced legislation that would allocate millions of dollars for local governments to create dedicated teams that could “update and rebuild” government systems.The United States Digital Service, an office established in 2014 after the widespread failures of Healthcare.gov, provides IT support for the federal government, bringing technologists into the government to work on tools like federal websites.It’s continued to operate under the Trump administration, and some states, Harris’ office notes, have experimented with similar teams.Harris’ bill, the Digital Service Act, would provide an annual $50 million to the federal service, but it also goes further, allocating $15 million per year to state and local governments to create similar teams.Under the plan, the national Digital Service would offer two-year grants, giving state and local governments between $200,000 and $2.5 million per year.Those governments would be required to take on 20 percent of costs and to spend at least half of the money on talent, rather than tech.
US
We expect a lot from our phones: communications, internet access, entertainment.A man in New South Wales in Australia seems to have discovered an extra bonus feature of his phone: the ability to stop an arrow.Here's the story from the New South Wales police, complete with lots of "allegedlys."On Wednesday, a 43-year-old man pulled into his driveway in the small village of Nimbin.He got out and spotted another man he knew standing outside his property line, allegedly armed with a bow and arrow.The first man whipped out his phone to snap a photo of the bow-wielding guy.
US
Google has seen plenty of success with Chromebooks and recently launched the Pixel Slate, but plans for future hardware could now be in question.According to a report from Business Insider, the company is reassigning dozens of employees in its laptop and tablet division as part of “roadmap cutbacks.”Citing internal sources, Business Insider reports that the impact of reassignments has led to the cancellation of several projects which have already been in the works, including laptops and tablets.Specifically, Google is reportedly cutting back on its “Create” team as part of plans to “re-assess product plans.” It will temporarily be sending these employees to work on new projects within the company.Hardware engineers, technical program managers, and support program managers in this division are all involved in the changes.The Google Home and Wearables teams are not impacted.
China
“We can confirm that Mobike has submitted a proposal to Singapore LTA [Land Transport Authority] for a managed and orderly withdrawal from the market,” said a spokesman for Mobike owner Meituan Dianping.“We will work with LTA to explore all options, including the potential to transfer our operations or license to existing licensees to minimize impact to consumers,” the spokesman said, without giving a date for the startup’s exit.Under Singapore’s Parking Places Act, a bike-sharing license may only be surrendered with the LTA’s written consent.The LTA confirmed it is considering Mobike’s proposal for a “proper” exit from the city-state.It also said the company had withdrawn its earlier applications to expand its dockless bike fleet and to launch an e-scooter sharing service.Congratulations on completing yet another story on Tech in Asia.
Sweden
Two pilots in the united states has previously warned of problems with the flygplansmodellen Boeing 737 Max 8, reports the news agency AP.It is the same aircraft model at the accidents in Indonesia in October and in Ethiopia on Sunday.a Total of 346 people died in the two accidents.the Pilots have stated that the aircraft störtdykt shortly after that they switched on the autopilot.In both cases, the pilots regained control over the pitch and rätat them up after the autopilot has been disconnected.The two safety update reports, which came in last year, is voluntary and anonymous.
US
San Francisco startup Tetrate, which develops an app management platform for hybrid and multicloud environments, today emerged from stealth with $12.5 million in financing led by Dell Technologies Capital, with participation from 8VC, Intel Capital, Rain Capital, and Samsung Next.It also attracted individual investments from a number of industry executives, including former Cisco chief development officer Pankaj Patel, Yubico chief product officer Guido Appenzeller, and WeWork’s Shiva Rajaraman.“Fortune 500 enterprises need a microservices-friendly networking layer to power their digital transformation, including application modernization and public/hybrid cloud adoption,” said CEO and former Google Cloud Platform product manager Varun Talwar.“Tetrate’s mission is to create a secure and flexible application networking layer to help enterprises transition from their decades-old rigid networking stack.Our tools and technologies will help customers with availability and manageability of their applications as they undergo this transformation.”Boiled down to basics, Tetrate’s technologies enable dev teams to run and manage microservices — a collection of loosely coupled, independently deployable components embedded within larger apps — across private and public clouds.
UK
Ongoing concerns in the US about Chinese company Huawei have spread to Germany, where security agencies have been warned that they’ll be cut off from certain intelligence data if Huawei equipment is used as part of the nation’s 5G infrastructure.The matter stems from concerns in the US that Huawei could be used by the Chinese government for espionage purposes, though the mobile company has repeatedly denied the claims.The warning was outlined in a letter from US Ambassador to Germany Richard A. Grenell, according to a report from the WSJ.In the letter, German officials are warned that the US will stop sharing certain intelligence information with Germany’s intelligence agencies if the nation allows Huawei Technologies equipment to be used as part of its 5G infrastructure.The concern appears to revolve around the potential for Huawei equipment to be used by China for espionage.According to the report, the US doesn’t plan to end its intelligence sharing with Germany in the event this equipment is used, but rather limit the scope of the data.
US
Meet the "Galleonosaurus dorisae", or Galleonosaurus for shortIt's 125 million years old and once bopped about Victoria, southeastern Australia on its hind legs during the Cretaceous.In the common parlance of stereotypical Australians that don't actually exist, you might call her a "little ripper".It is thought to have been the size of the most Australian of animals: the wallaby.The Galleonosaurus was a small herbivorous creature from the ornithopod family, but it knew how to move."These small dinosaurs would have been agile runners on their powerful hind legs," said Dr Matthew Herne, a vertebrate palaeontologist from the University of New England in Armidale, New South Wales.Ornithopods were among the most successful herbivores in the Cretaceous period, starting out as small bipedal grazers but eventually got as big as the Edmontosaurus, which could grow to up to 50 feet (15 metres) long.
US
Starbucks founder Howard Schultz has not said definitively whether he will run for president.As he’s mulling over the idea, he says he’s speaking to Americans across the country and presenting them with a possible centrist candidate as an answer to what he believes is a broken two-party system.Schultz, over the course of a panel with CNN’s Dylan Byers at South by Southwest in Austin, argued that if he were president he would convince businesses to do more for people.Below are the key insights on brand building, capitalism, businesses doing good and the Howard Schultz brand from the discussion.Balance a fiduciary responsibility and humanity“In 1987, Starbucks had 11 stores and 100 employees,” said Schultz.
US
Responding to Elizabeth Warren’s call to regulate and break up some of the nation’s largest technology companies, the venture capitalists that invest in technology companies are advising the presidential hopeful to move slowly and not break anything.Warren’s plan called for regulators to be appointed to oversee the unwinding of several acquisitions that were critical to the development of the core technology that make Alphabet’s Google and the social media giant Facebook so profitable… and Zappos.Warren also wanted regulation in place that would block companies making over $25 billion that operate as social media or search platforms or marketplaces from owning companies that also sell services on those marketplaces.“As they say on Broadway, ‘you gotta have a gimmick’ and this is clearly Warren’s,” says Ben Narasin, an investor at one of the nation’s largest investment firms,” New Enterprise Associates, which has $18 billion in assets under management and has invested in consumer companies like Jet, an online and mobile retailer that competed with Amazon and was sold to Walmart for $3.3 billion.“Decades ago, at the peak of Japanese growth as a technology competitor on the global stage, the US government sought to break up IBM .“We slow down our country, our economy and our ability to innovate when the government becomes excessively aggressive in efforts to break up technology companies, because they see them through a prior-decades lens, when they are operating in a future decade reality.
US
Ten years after the launch of Foursquare at SXSW, the company is laying its technology bare with a futuristic version of its old app that doesn’t require a check-in at all.The godfather of location apps is returning to the launchpad with Hypertrending, but this time it hopes to learn what developers might do with real-time info about where people are and where they aren’t.Hypertrending uses Foursquare’s Pilgrim technology, which is baked into Foursquare’s apps and offered as an third-party enterprise tool, to show where phones are in real time over the course of SXSW in Austin, TX.Hypertrending also has a Top 100 list that is updated in real time to show which places are super popular, with arrows to show whether a place is trending up or down.Hypertrending was cooked up in Foursquare’s skunkworks division, Foursquare Labs, led by the company’s cofounder Dennis Crowley .The feature is only available during SXSW and in the Austin area, and thus far Foursquare has no plans to launch this publicly.
US
The animated masks, glasses, and hats that apps like YouTube Stories overlay on faces are pretty nifty, but how on earth do they look so realistic?Well, thanks to a deep dive published this morning by Google’s AI research division, it’s less of a mystery than before.In the blog post, engineers at the Mountain View company describe the AI tech at the core of Stories and ARCore’s Augmented Faces API, which they say can simulate light reflections, model face occlusions, model specular reflection, and more — all in real time with a single camera.“One of the key challenges in making these AR features possible is proper anchoring of the virtual content to the real world,” Google AI’s Artsiom Ablavatski and Ivan Grishchenko explain, adding “a process that requires a unique set of perceptive technologies able to track the highly dynamic surface geometry across every smile, frown, or smirk.”Google’s augmented reality (AR) pipeline, which taps TensorFlow Lite — a lightweight, mobile, and embedded implementation of Google’s TensorFlow machine learning framework — for hardware-accelerated processing where available, comprises two neural networks (i.e., layers of math functions modeled after biological neurons).The first — a detector — operates on camera data and computes face locations, while the second — a 3D mesh model — uses that location data to predict surface geometry.
US
Airbnb is broadening its accommodation business with a plan to acquire last-minute hotel booking service HotelTonight.The cost of the deal hasn’t been disclosed.The move comes ahead of Airbnb’s IPO later this year, and could help to make the company an even more attractive proposition for investors.HotelTonight, which helps travelers secure same-day accommodation via its app or website, launched in 2010 and currently offers hotel rooms in more than 1,700 cities in around 35 countries.Both based in San Francisco, Airbnb announced its intention to buy HotelTonight in a message posted on its website on Thursday.Brian Chesky, Airbnb CEO and co-founder, said the move fits with its plan to create an end-to-end travel platform that can serve every guest, “whether they plan their trip a year or a day in advance.” Beyond accommodation, Airbnb’s expanding service also offers carefully selected activities and experiences for travelers, as well as spaces for business meetings and other gatherings.
UK
On one hand, you’ve got a resurgent nativist right who desperately want to raise the drawbridge – or, at the very least, severely limit who can cross it.The UK’s tech sector is, as you might expect, terrified it at the prospect of being cut off from one of their biggest sources of tech talent.In the last year, I’ve met Estonian, Hungarian, and Polish tech leaders who have made the UK their home, thanks to its erstwhile reputation as an open and deeply international country.Brexit will damage the UK’s tech sector.To try and stem the damage, the Centre for Policy Studies (CPS), supported by food delivery giant Deliveroo, is proposing a new “unicorn visa,” which will allow the fastest growing tech companies to recruit from abroad with a minimum of fuss.The paper starts by acknowledging the UK has a dearth of qualified tech workers.
China
How hard is it for friends to be co-founders?Can you grow a company while raising a baby?Tech in Asia finds out how these co-founders make it work.Come in and experience Spaces yourself.To learn more, visit its website and apply for a tour.(And yes, we’re serious about ethics and transparency.
More

Top