Owen Grundy

Owen Grundy

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(Penn State) By examining how fruit flies use eye movements to enhance flight control with a staggeringly fast reaction speed -- about 30 times faster than the blink of an eye -- Penn State researchers have detailed a framework to mimic this ability in robotics.
Photo by Sean O’Kane / The Verge Revel’s shared electric mopeds are now available in San Francisco, with over 430 mopeds scattered across in the city, the company says. Revel has been expanding into new cities across the US this year even as it faces questions about its safety protocols. Revel isn’t new to the Bay Area; the company also operates in Berkeley and Oakland. But the scooters that are available in San Francisco are not the same as the ones offered in other markets like New York City. The company says the mopeds are custom-designed with new hardware, including a 2960-watt motor “designed to help riders navigate San Francisco’s famous hills.” “designed to help riders navigate San Francisco’s famous hills” The mopeds are serviced and rebalanced by a staff of... Continue reading…
Here's how to watch today's BMW Championship, the second round in the Fedex Cup Playoffs, for free online.
A joint declaration has removed any doubt about where the island nation, which China thinks it owns, stands on the matter of 5G security.
(Rice University) Rice University researchers are creating a table-top system that uses light, ranging from terahertz to extreme ultraviolet, to spectrographically probe materials that are simultaneously cooled near absolute zero and subjected to a 50-tesla magnetic pulse.
Here's everything you need to know about World of Warcraft: Shadowlands.
NEC-SX Aurora Tsubasa can be installed into a desktop and run AI/ML workloads.
Alphabet reportedly mulled participating in a group bid for a small stake in the short-form video app.
These replacement grates can upgrade a gas grill by improving its heat distribution. But not everyone will see the same results.
Senator Kamala Harris painted a vision of America that celebrated diversity in her historic Democratic National Convention speech. The senator from California, who made history when selected as Biden’s running mate last week, spoke live from Wilmington, Delaware, on Wednesday. (The major political event was held virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic.) Harris said she was “committed to the values” that her mother, an immigrant from India, had taught her. “She raised us to be proud, strong Black women,” Harris said of her mother, Shyamala Gopalan Harris, who died of cancer in 2009. “And she raised us to know and be proud of our Indian heritage.” Harris then spoke of a “vision passed on through generations of Americans — one that Joe Biden shares. ... A vision of our nation as a beloved community, where all are welcome, no matter what we look like, where we come from or who we love.”Harris also criticised President Donald Trump — who has a long, ongoing history of racism — saying that Americans “must elect a president who will bring something different, something better... A president who will bring all of us together — Black, white, Latino, Asian, Indigenous — to achieve the future we collectively want.”Harris, 55, is the second Black woman ever to serve in the U.S. Senate and is the first Black and first Asian American nominee for vice president by a major political party. If elected, she will also become the first female vice president in U.S. history.A short video that played before Harris’ remarks Wednesday featured several Black women speaking about the senator, one of them describing Harris as “someone who can fight for Black people, brown people, undocumented people, LGBT people, disabled people.” It included a clip from an interview in which Harris said, “The litmus test for America is how we are treating Black women.”Kamala Harris pays tribute to the trailblazers who came before her in her DNC address #DemConventionpic.twitter.com/eZF0VeBQAf— NowThis (@nowthisnews) August 20, 2020Before Biden tapped her for the ticket, Harris was one of his rivals in the Democratic primary race last year. In one of the most powerful moments in the Democratic debates, Harris called out Biden for his collaboration with segregationist lawmakers early in his Senate career and for his opposition to busing to integrate schools. Harris said she herself was bused to school as a young student in Oakland, California. But a few months after dropping out of the presidential race in December, Harris endorsed Biden and has since staunchly supported his candidacy. Harris first appeared with Biden last week after she was added to the presidential ticket. Both she and Biden took aim at Trump, and Harris criticised the president’s “mismanagement of the pandemic.” “America is crying out for leadership, yet we have a president who cares more about himself than the people who elected him,” she said.Again on Wednesday, Harris called out how “Trump’s failure of leadership has cost lives and livelihoods.” The U.S. continues to lead the world in coronavirus cases and deaths, with over 5.5 million confirmed cases and more than 172,000 dead so far. Harris noted that Black, Latino and Indigenous people are “suffering and dying disproportionately” from COVID-19.“This is not a coincidence. It is the effect of structural racism,” Harris said.Harris opened Wednesday’s event with brief remarks calling out voter suppression efforts, including “obstacles, misinformation and folks making it harder for us to cast our ballot.” The senator’s statements come as Trump has been spreading lies about mail-in voting being “fraudulent” and undermining the U.S. Postal Service. Democratic lawmakers have called the U.S. postmaster general, a Trump donor, to testify about recent changes in operations that have led to mail delays. These changes have since been suspended until after the election, as outrage grew around mailed ballots possibly not arriving on time to be counted in November.“We need to ask ourselves, why don’t they want us to vote? Why is there so much effort to silence our voices?” Harris said Wednesday, urging all Americans to create a “voting plan.” “The answer is because when we vote, things change … When we vote, we address the need for all people to be treated with dignity and respect in our country.” Harris explicitly spelled out where she was born: at Kaiser Hospital in Oakland. It appeared to be a subtle response to racist birther conspiracies spread by right-wing pundits and echoed by Trump, suggesting she may not be eligible for the office of vice president because of her parents’ immigration status when she was born. There is no question of Harris’s eligibility. This is notably a continuation of Trump’s history of perpetuating birther conspiracy theories about former President Barack Obama.  In Obama’s speech Wednesday night, the former president described Harris as his friend and as “someone who knows what it’s like to overcome barriers and who’s made a career fighting to help others live out their own American dream.”Harris’s sister Maya Harris, who was chairwoman of Harris’s presidential campaign, introduced the vice presidential nominee, along with Harris’s niece Meena Harris and her stepdaughter Ella Emhoff, who called the candidate “Momala.” “You’re showing my daughters, and so many girls around the world who look like them, what’s possible,” Meena Harris said. Related... Barack Obama Gives Blistering Critique Of Trump’s Presidency In DNC Speech Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Slams NBC’s ‘Unacceptable, Disappointing' Tweet About Her Trump 'Appreciates' QAnon Supporters 'Like Me Very Much'
A state judge ruled that Uber and Lyft must start classifying their drivers as employees instead of gig workers starting on Thursday. In response, the firms are threatening to temporarily shut down their businesses in California.  Here's how Uber and Lyft have fought hard over worker classification in their home state — and how their fight heated up this month. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Ride-sharing giants Uber and Lyft are threatening to pull their businesses from their home state of California on Thursday until at least November and possibly longer, if a judge doesn't grant them a 10-day stay on a ruling that classifies drivers as employees. This is the latest effort from the firms to keep their drivers classified — and paid — as contractors instead of employees. Companies like Uber and Lyft have built their business models around hiring drivers as independent contractors, reserving full-time employee status for corporate jobs such as the tech workers that build and run their app. Classifying drivers as contractors allows them to keep their costs lower. They've said doing so also affords drivers flexibility in how and when they work. If the companies were to reclassify them as full-time employees, they could have to pay them higher wages and more benefits including unemployment insurance. Doing so would have a major long-lasting impact on Uber and Lyft businesses but especially now, in the wake of the pandemic, where revenues from their rides businesses have suffered. Here's how California has upped the ante in recent months to get the firms to upgrade drivers to employee status: In January, a controversial gig worker law called Assembly Bill 5 (AB5) went into effect that made it harder for companies to classify workers as contractors. The law was designed for companies that rely on gig workers. Uber and Postmates pushed back and filed a lawsuit that challenged the law while Lyft continued to argue that their drivers were contractors, even under the new law. As a result, drivers alleged in April that they were collectively owed more than $630 million in back wages since the first few months of the year. In May, the companies were hit with a lawsuit from the California Attorney General over their refusal to recognize drivers as employees, a classification made even more crucial given the COVID-19 pandemic, the subsequent economic fallout, and the rise in unemployment. Then, California's labor commissioner filed a lawsuit against both companies on August 5 alleging that the firms were "committing wage theft" by "willfully misclassifying" drivers as contractors instead of employees. A state judge ruled on August 10 that the firms indeed would have to start classifying all drivers as employees by August 20, but both companies have argued that migrating all of their gig workers to employee status would take time and are appealing for a delay. If the appeal isn't successful, they are threatening to shut down business throughout California on Thursday until at least the election in November. Uber sent an alert out to customers on Tuesday night warning riders of a potential shutdown. It's worth noting that both Uber and Lyft have a history of threatening to pull their businesses from markets when they don't want to comply with regulations. Doing so has worked in some cases, as Business Insider's Tyler Sonnemaker reported. Uber and Lyft are also toying with other workaround options that would change their business model in the hope of avoiding California's law, like adopting a franchise model, The New York Times reported Tuesday. Meanwhile, Uber and Lyft, as well as other firms with heavy gig workforces, have been pouring millions into funding for a November ballot measure called Proposition 22, the Chronicle's Carolyn Said reports. Prop 22 aims to get ride-sharing and food-delivery services classified as exemptions from the AB5 law. Worth noting, if Uber and Lyft do shutdown in California, this could prompt voters to back Prop 22 come November after being cut off from the convenience of ride-sharing services. Instead of AB5, the companies have been advocating for regulators to create a third classification, just for gig workers. It would allow platforms to set up a so-called "benefits fund" that would offer cash stipends to help gig workers cover some of their expenses, like healthcare or paid time off, without risk that the workers could later claim they were employees, not contractors.SEE ALSO: Travis Kalanick reportedly threw a party at his Los Angeles home amid a spike in coronavirus cases in Southern California SEE ALSO: A Stanford economics professor who was once an Uber driver says Uber and Lyft are not 'exploiting' drivers, so California's new AB5 law creates more problems than it solves Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Leslie Odom, Jr.'s $500,000 gamble that led to a starring role in 'Hamilton'
Some of the first credible reporting about the “Apple iWatch” I remember reading described it as being “made of curved glass.” The eventual Apple Watch did use curved glass to an extent, of course, but it wasn’t really a defining feature of the product. After all, in 2013 The New York Times said Apple’s watch was expected to “stand apart from competitors based on the company’s understanding of how such glass can curve around the human body.” I was imagining something a little more futuristic than what we got. Something that looked more or less like the Nubia Watch, as it happens. Nubia’s new smartwatch is essentially a bracelet dominated by a large flexible OLED screen that curves halfway around your wrist, which is technically pretty... Continue reading…
After the comedian was accused of sexual misconduct, he’s getting recast.
Need a mug to keep coffee warm for more than 30 minutes? How about a videogame to help you relax? We've found plenty of discounts to help.
Some physicists think our data is as real as the air we breathe and it may eventually overtake our world.
Terror cyberfinance campaigns are being targeted by the US government.
Astronomers have used the ALMA, Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array to observe an extremely distant galaxy that looks surprisingly like our Milky Way. The researchers say that the galaxy is very young, and the light from the galaxy has taken over 12 billion years to reach us. Scientists view the galaxy as it was when the universe was only 1.4 billion … Continue reading
You can set up Netflix closed captions or subtitles for any show or movie, with a variety of languages and customizations available. Netflix users can choose the type of font, background, and preferred languages for subtitles in Account Settings.  Visit Business Insider's Tech Reference library for more stories. Subtitles on Netflix are a great way to keep up with the dialogue of your favorite show or movie without missing a beat, as well as for those who are hearing impaired, or if you are watching a show in a different language.  Netflix gives viewers the option to select a variety of subtitle preferences, including font style, background color, and text size. While viewing a video, you can also update your preferred language for subtitles.  Accessing subtitle preferences is simple, and enabling those preferences can be done in just a few easy steps, either within the video player window or through Netflix Account Settings.  Check out the products mentioned in this article: Netflix Subscription (From $8.99 from Netflix) Apple 4K TV (from $179.00 at Apple) Samsung 50-inch Smart TV (from $399.99 at Best Buy) How to turn on Netflix closed captions on your device If you're using a computer, tablet, or smartphone: After you've selected a title to watch, tap or click the middle of the video player, then select the "Audio & Subtitles" icon and choose a subtitle option. If you're using a smart TV or gaming console: While viewing the selected title, use your remote's "down" or "up" arrow to access the video player menu. Then, select the "Audio & Subtitles" icon and choose a subtitle option. If you're using an Apple TV: Depending on the Apple TV model you have, either hold down the center button or swipe down on your Apple TV remote while the selected title is playing. Then, select the "Audio & Subtitles" icon and choose a subtitle option.  How to edit the subtitle appearance in Netflix Account Settings on a computer 1. Log into your Netflix account on your preferred web browser.  2. In the top right corner, hover over your profile icon and select "Account" from the dropdown menu.  3. On the next screen, under "Profile & Parental Controls," select the profile you would like to manage subtitles for.  4. Under the profile's account settings, select "Change" in the "Subtitle appearance" category.  5. Next, using the dropdown menus, select the desired font and shadow for the subtitle appearance.  6. Then, select the desired text size, and colors for the subtitle background and window. Subtitle appearance is not available to viewers whose primary language is Thai, Hebrew, Arabic, Romanian, Korean, or Japanese. 7. Select "Save" at the bottom. To reset your subtitle preferences, follow the steps above and then select the "Reset to default" button.  8. Open Netflix on your device, and begin watching. Your updated subtitle preferences should now be reflected in the video.  How to change preferred audio or subtitle language in Netflix on your device 1. Launch Netflix on your device.  2. Select a TV show or movie to watch.  3. While the video is playing, hover your mouse or tap in the center of the screen: The menu items will appear.  4. At the bottom right corner of the video player, select the "Audio & Subtitles" icon (resembling a text bubble).  5. On the right side of the pop-up menu, you will see "Subtitles" where you can disable subtitles, or select from a list of languages. Netflix usually lists five to seven languages it thinks are relevant based on your location data or preferred settings. Select the desired option, and a white check mark will appear beside your selection and will begin populating on the screen.  6. On the left side of the pop-up menu, you will see "Audio" where you can change your audio preference, if there are available audio options other than English. Related coverage from Tech Reference: How to turn off subtitles on your Apple TV or edit their appearance How to turn off language subtitles on the Disney Plus app on your streaming device How to turn on subtitles on Quibi and watch shows in your chosen language How to turn on subtitles on Amazon Prime Video using your viewing device How to turn off subtitles on Hulu on the desktop website or mobile app SEE ALSO: The best media streaming sticks and devices Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
The FBI has warned that Iranian hackers are using the BIG-IP exploit to attack US private and government networks. In the security alert, the FBI did not name any specific group or campaign but ZDNet’s sources told the publication “the group is tracked by the larger cyber-security community under codenames such as Fox Kitten or Parasite.” The alert... Read more » The post FBI claims Iran is using BIG-IP exploit to attack US private and government networks appeared first on Telecoms Tech News.
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