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Organizations nowadays have their applications and data spread across Data Centers, Clouds, and Edge environments in diverse geographical regions.To meet the requirements of this diverse hybrid ICT landscape, organizations need new networking architecture that is ready for Cloud, meets application connectivity demands, and ensures technology and operational consistency across locations.Therefore, the new-age network must facilitate faster and safer modes of data transfer across Data Centers, Cloud, and Edge devices.This highlights the significance of Cloud-ready Networks with DC Interconnects and Cloud Connect capabilities.Being a trusted ICT company, Sify ensures a Cloud-ready Network, comprising of Data Center Interconnects, Hyperscale Cloud Connects, and Internet Exchanges for carrier neutrality.Our Cloud-ready Network provides you with deterministic and secure connectivity to move applications, middleware, and database workloads between private infrastructure and Cloud for improved application performance.Hybrid WAN and Application performance-focused Network Architecture:In the age of hybrid and multi-cloud, it becomes critical for organizations to have a well-thought-out network strategy for distributed workloads, data footprints, applications, services, and microservices.With the rise in multi-cloud adoption, the legacy hub-and-spoke WAN architecture can hold organizations back.
In the pre-pandemic world, the global industries were probably walking to reach their digital destination.But the COVID-19 outbreak has compelled them to sprint, jump, and somersault to achieve digital excellence as soon as they can.And certainly, telecom sector has kept up the pace too for delivering the network connectivity demands of the world.At this point, it is not possible to predict the timeline for the return of normalcy.But, looking at the way the world has adapted to the remote scenario, it is safe to say that the telecommunications sector has to work harder toward building smarter, safer, and stronger solutions.In 2021, T-mobile will extend its fast 5G services across the nation.The company has promised that their network will blanket an area covering almost 200 million people by the end of next year.Neville Ray, T-Mobile’s president for technology, recently spoke to Fortune – “We’re off to the races and came out of the blocks super quick.
One thing that emerged from the roundtable that was new (and fascinating) to me, was the concept of order management for B2B customers.Just as many of us during lockdown have become accustomed to ordering items and eagerly awaiting their arrival, it can be an anxious wait for business customers who have placed a large order with a telecom firm.For example, if a bank orders a batch of phones for employees, it needs to know when they are arriving, what set-up they require and what support is available.So, the concept of order management, where smart systems are used to catalogue and communicate the progress of an order to customers, is becoming increasingly welcome.A simple automated message that updates the customer on their order status is both reassuring and practical, allowing them to make the necessary arrangements to receive and process the delivery, thus giving the customer a great experience.The consumerisation of B2BIt was this last point that led us to discuss another topic that is close to my heart and becoming increasingly debated among telecom professionals.Personalisation and automation have, for a while, played a major part in consumer customer service–.They should in the B2B world, too.Taking the order management example mentioned above, as consumers we know we can expect similar order updates from retailers and delivery drivers.Food delivery services have become extremely creative in this regard; for example, offering an animated diagram depicting whether your order is being prepared or cooked or is already out for delivery.
We believe that creating “knowledge sharing” by putting the right information in the right hands will contribute to real progress.Tremendous technology is right around the corner, and all companies need to do is chase it up and develop it.We all are well aware how COVID19 has affected the whole world and different businesses.But the business that still is at its boom for its unstoppable demand is telecommunication.Telecommunication means the transfer of signals over long distances.However, that no longer just covers our old-fashioned telephone lines, the range of services has become explicitly vast.There are several services that fall under the telecom business umbrella.These can vary from small scale to large scale setups and can include the following;Internet service providersLandline service providersTelevision networksMobile/cellular networksSecurity and software providersThere are an array of services that come under the telecom sector.
Telecom giants are already using 5G applications and IoT devices to target industry verticals.The Healthcare sector is using telemedicine as a cost-effective and timely means of delivering diagnoses and treatments.Connected cars are improving means of transportation and traffic infrastructure.The education sector is using e-learning as the world is adjusting to the new normal amidst COVID.Telecoms are expanding into all sorts of sectors by automating processes for online customers and offering a whole set of technologies to make telecommunications better.Artificial IntelligenceAs the telecom industry is heavily based on technological advances, many are already using AI technology such as virtual assistants, chatbots, and tools to improve customer experience and satisfaction.These solutions offer unmatched ability to process and analyze an enormous amount of big data that provides valuable insights to improve the quality of service and increase revenue.It is also hard at work predicting future actions needed to reach specific business goals.More info: SDWAN RoutersArtificial intelligence provides new ways to optimize network maintenance, predictive maintenance, and customer service costs allowing operators to prepare personalized offers for their B2C and B2B customers.AI also detects problems in the network, allows self-healing, and protects networks from any fraudulent activities.Internet of Things and TelematicsThe Internet of Things has transformed the roles of telecom service providers to enable better communication between people and devices.
Gain Access to All the Voip Functionality Your Business NeedsUnlock your full business potential with Ringover.Our business lines take mere minutes to set up, allowing your employees to start making unlimited calls from anywhere, to anywhere.We offer a wide variety of robust business solutions that can streamline the way you communicate, whether you’re working in the office or at home.Every town and city center contains empty buildings right now, and some organizations have decided they are going to a completely distributed remote-first future, and will never come back.However, in most cases this is not a practical option, if only because of investment in lengthy leases or real estate owned, and others have concerns about productivity and cultural continuity.In cybersecurity terms it should be easier, to protect vital IP and personal data, if people are physically located in one place.But the reality is, that whatever nostalgic longings they have, reopening of office buildings does not mean time travel back to the pre-pandemic days - when people crammed on to rush hour trains 5 days a week to sit side-by-side and work simultaneously.Information security professionals are dealing with a new reality, not a return to what we knew before.It used to be fairly easy to manage networks and perimeters from a technical point of view, but what about now?
This will help you ensure that your customers don’t have to wait in line for someone to answer their questions.Also, your customer care executives won’t have to spend time-solving repetitive issues.Since a conversational bot is also part of a company’s communication strategy, creating a tone of voice manual for this channel is super important to align it with how the organization speaks to its customers.Here's your basic must-have information:• Who does the conversational bot talk to?Meaning, the target audience we discussed in number 4.• What does it talk about?Is it an informational bot for undergrad applicants, or does it offer product or service promotions?• How does it talk?Is it familiar with customers?This manual will also really help anyone that's added in to managing the bot.A great example of this is the telecommunication company, Movistar.They partnered with Aivo to deliver instant solutions to their customers without having to talk to a human agent and go through long wait times.With our conversational bot, Movistar reached a +80% customer retention rate, established more than 2.5 million conversations and achieved a 1:20’ average time on digital channels.Use live chats to handle more complex issuesOnce your team is not wasting time with repetitive and frequent questions, they will have more time to actually handle complex issues that a chatbot cannot solve.More info: what is icnd
Investment levels: 2020 will likely see some reduction in investment plans due to reduced discretionary spend and some practical challenges to installations and supply chains due to the pandemic.However, these effects should be short lived as the enhanced focus on connectivity and consumer appetite for higher speeds drive investment.Operators though will continue to focus on efficiencies, with network sharing and operational digitisation key.Inflation: longer term, if the wall of money generated by the significant fiscal and monetary stimuli seen in many counties leads to a sustained pick up inflation rates, then operators could well benefit from a degree of pricing power.CPI-linked price increases are already a feature in a number of European markets, and could see more widespread adoption in an inflationary environmentConsumer sentiment: A positive for the sector is a likely improvement in consumer sentiment, having long viewed telecom companies with a certain disdain.This reflects factors such as bill shock, coverage issues and perceived poor customer service.However, the centrality of connectivity to life in lockdown and measures aimed at helping users should improve consumer attitudes.
In earlier days, the data stores were expensive, and data was stored in siloed – separated and often incompatible – data stores.This was creating barriers to make use of an enormous volume and variety of information.Business Intelligence (BI) vendors like IBM, Oracle, SAS, Tibco, and QlikTech are breaking down these walls between data storage and this provides a lot of jobs for telecom data scientists.When a network is down, underutilized, overtaxed, or nearing maximum capacity, the costs add upThe telecommunication industry has been combating traditional frauds related to voice calls, text messages and IP exchange.The high frequency of these frauds, globally dispersed origins, and multiple layers of machine and network generated anonymity makes these frauds hard to detect and avert.In addition to these telecom frauds, following are the schemes on the rise that the telecom industry must prepare for.Frequent updates in technologies open gates to different types of threats of vulnerabilities.It is imperative for any telecom company to adjust fraud management systems to counteract them all and preferably in real-time.
Rapper Travis Scott staged a virtual concert within the video game Fortnite that attracted 27.7 million unique players, making it Epic Games’ most successful in-game event ever and helping to launch the rapper’s newest single, “The Scotts,” to No.Meanwhile, in Block by Blockwest, a virtual music festival inside the Minecraft video game, nearly 30 bands performed across three stages (servers) during an event streamed by 134,000 users.While the convergence of content and distribution channels has been apparent for some time, the COVID-19 pandemic sent this trend into overdrive.Box-office revenues have been declining for years as consumers watch more films from home on streaming video services.With COVID-19 closing theaters, some studios released movies directly to consumers.In the short term, this approach helps studios to counter the closure of theaters due to the pandemic.It could also serve a more strategic purpose: providing a powerful hook for acquiring and retaining customers on subscription-based video streaming platforms.Of course, no one knows how the coming months will further shift viewers’ actions and preferences.
According to a report by leading research firm Market Research Store, the Indian telecommunication services market will likely grow by 10.3 per cent year-on-year to reach US$ 103.9 billion by 2020.Spectrum held by telecom operators cannot be transferred to new buyers under insolvency proceedings if government dues are not cleared, the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal (NCLAT) ruled on Tuesday, dealing a blow to lenders to bankrupt telcos Reliance Communications Ltd (RCom), Aircel Group and Videocon Telecommunications Ltd.The telecom market can be split into three segments - wireline, wireless and internet services.The wireline (fixed) segment consists of companies that provide direct communication through landlines/ whereas the wireless segment comprises of establishments that provide communication through airwaves.Internet services include Internet Service Providers (ISPs) that offer broadband internet connections through consumer and corporate channels.The wireless market comprises 98.1% of the total subscriber base.Tariff reduction and decline in handset costs has helped this segment to scale.It has also gained dominance by making itself available in rural areas where the tele-density is far lower.India is currently the world's second-largest telecommunications market, having a subscriber base of around 1.2 billion.Owing to rapid expansion taking place in the Indian mobile economy, it is expected to contribute substantially to India's GDP.The subscriber base is also widening on account of increasing mobile network coverage and competition-induced tariff reductions.
In the early 1970s, following years of resistance to the idea, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) began setting aside a range of radio frequencies for radio telephony.Near the end of that decade, a trial of cellular phone technology had been conducted in Chicago, and the world’s first commercial cellular phone service was introduced in Tokyo, Japan.By the early 1980s, the FCC was issuing wireless telephony licenses and setting up metropolitan and rural jurisdictions (so-called metropolitan statistical areas and rural service areas), and, by the middle of the decade, first-generation wireless systems were being deployed in the United States.These systems were based on analog cellular technology using the advanced mobile phone system (or AMPS) technology that had been developed by Bell Labs.Cellular technology was being deployed in other countries, as well, although the technology and standards adopted internationally were very different from those used in the United States.Thus began one of today’s most vibrant and competitive industries—competition among wireless providers in today’s market is fierce, and new products and services emerge almost on a daily basis now.Growing consumer demand and the need to make better use of available spectrum resources fueled the development of a second generation of wireless technologies (also commonly referred to as 2G technologies).This second generation marked the transition to a fully digital technology, providing enhanced quality and enabling better use of spectrum resources.
Increasingly IT systems must incorporate all three elements to different degrees,8 and it is increasingly common for companies in any sector of IT to offer products with a communications component, and often with a communications emphasis.The IT industry’s overall strength depends on strength across communications, processing, and storage as well as strength in all layers of technology—from the physical layer (including communications hardware, microprocessors, and magnetic and optical storage), to the software infrastructure layers (operating systems and Web services), to software applications.In this era of globalization, many companies are multinational, with operations—including R—conducted across the globe.For example, IBM, HP, Qualcomm, and Microsoft all have research facilities in other countries, and many European and Asian companies have research laboratories in the United States.Increasing numbers of businesses compete globally.Every company and every industry must assess the segments and niches in which it operates to remain globally competitive.Both Asian and European nations are continuing to pursue strategies that exploit perceived U.S. weakness in telecommunications and telecommunications research as a way of improving their competitiveness in telecommunications, as well as in information technology more broadly.Leapfrogging the United States in telecommunications has, in the opinion of the committee, been an explicit and stated strategy for a number of Asian (in broadband and wireless) and European (in wireless) nations for the past decade, with notable success.
As more defense- and homeland security-related systems are interconnected, the pressure will increase on the United States to develop new technologies here at home, because relying on foreign suppliers for critical network components like firewalls and communications software might open the door to serious compromises of security and availability across a wide range of defense capabilities.Military superiority.In a military context, the goal is superiority over the adversary, which requires having the best research and engineering capability in the world.Telecommunications continues to be a dynamic sector in which significant innovation is possible provided proper research investments are made.Some examples of potential payoffs from telecommunications research include the following:A significantly enhanced Internet architecture that goes beyond incremental improvements to the existing network architecture to provide enhancements such as greater trustworthiness in the network core and customer networks, improved addressing and routing, and end-to-end quality of service provisioning;New network architectures that take advantage of ever-greater storage densities, processing speeds, and communications bandwidths;More trustworthy telecommunications networks better able to address such challenges as maintaining the security of the voice network even in the face of a rising frequency, sophistication, and severity of attacks and the complexities and interdependencies that come with the convergence of voice and data networks;Ubiquitous, higher-performance, more-affordable broadband access that enables richer, more interactive applications, including applications in such important areas as health care and education;Telepresence and telecollaboration environments that reproduce a local space at a distance and enable spatially separated individuals or teams to work more readily in concert;Public safety networks that offer higher mobility, better adaptation to harsh and changing conditions, and increased resiliency to damage;More info: help desk technician
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As supported by the horizontally homogeneous layered infrastructure, applications of various sorts increasingly incorporate telecommunications as only one capability among many.For example telephony, as it evolves into the Internet world, is beginning to offer a host of new data-based features and integrates other elements of collaboration (e.g., visual material or tools for collaborative authoring).Another important trend is machine-to-machine communication at a distance, and so it cannot be assumed that telecommunications applications exclusively involve people.Like telecommunications itself, the telecommunications industry is broader than it was in the past.It encompasses multiple service providers, including telephone companies, cable system operators, Internet service providers, wireless carriers, and satellite operators.The industry today includes software-based applications with a communications emphasis and intermediate layers of software incorporated into end-to-end communication services.The descriptions of layers were adapted from the Open Systems Interconnect Reference Model (ISO 7498-1), which provides a useful tool for conceptualizing network layers.The term “telecommunications” takes on a particular significance with respect to the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and implementing regulations.
A significantly enhanced Internet architecture that goes beyond incremental improvements to the existing network architecture to provide enhancements such as greater trustworthiness in the network core and customer networks, improved addressing and routing, and end-to-end quality of service provisioning;New network architectures that take advantage of ever-greater storage densities, processing speeds, and communications bandwidths;More trustworthy telecommunications networks better able to address such challenges as maintaining the security of the voice network even in the face of a rising frequency, sophistication, and severity of attacks and the complexities and interdependencies that come with the convergence of voice and data networks;Ubiquitous, higher-performance, more-affordable broadband access that enables richer, more interactive applications, including applications in such important areas as health care and education;Telepresence and telecollaboration environments that reproduce a local space at a distance and enable spatially separated individuals or teams to work more readily in concert;Public safety networks that offer higher mobility, better adaptation to harsh and changing conditions, and increased resiliency to damage;Adaptive/cognitive wireless networks that enable higher-performance communications, make more efficient use of radio spectrum, and complement or supplant today’s chiefly wired networks;Location-based wireless networks that provide information and services tailored to the local environment;Self-organizing sensor networks that have large numbers of nodes, are energy efficient, and have self-organizing capabilities, which would enable ubiquitous, cheap monitoring of the environment and weather, sensing of biological or chemical agents, and monitoring of facilities; and New semiconductor devices that enable higher performance and new forms of communications and computing.More info: junior network engineer
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incorporated into equipment and facilities that are purchased by service providers and users.The service providers then, in turn, build networks in order to sell telecommunications services to end users.The end users include individuals subscribing to services like telephony (landline and cellular) and broadband Internet access, companies and organizations that contract for internal communications networks, and companies and organizations that operate their own networks.Some major end-user organizations also bypass service providers and buy, provision, and operate their own equipment and software, like a corporate local area network (LAN) or a U.S. military battlefield information system.Software suppliers participate at multiple points in the value chain, selling directly not only to equipment vendors but also to service providers (e.g., operational support systems) and to end users (e.g., various PC-based applications for communications using the Internet).An implication of defining telecommunications broadly is that every layer involved in communication at a distance becomes, at least partially, part of the telecommunications industry.The broad range and large number of companies that contribute to the telecommunications industry are evident in the following list of examples:Networking service providers across the Internet and the PSTN, wireless carriers, and cable operators.
In the early 1970s, following years of resistance to the idea, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) began setting aside a range of radio frequencies for radio telephony.Near the end of that decade, a trial of cellular phone technology had been conducted in Chicago, and the world’s first commercial cellular phone service was introduced in Tokyo, Japan.By the early 1980s, the FCC was issuing wireless telephony licenses and setting up metropolitan and rural jurisdictions (so-called metropolitan statistical areas and rural service areas), and, by the middle of the decade, first-generation wireless systems were being deployed in the United States.These systems were based on analog cellular technology using the advanced mobile phone system (or AMPS) technology that had been developed by Bell Labs.Cellular technology was being deployed in other countries, as well, although the technology and standards adopted internationally were very different from those used in the United States.Thus began one of today’s most vibrant and competitive industries—competition among wireless providers in today’s market is fierce, and new products and services emerge almost on a daily basis now.Growing consumer demand and the need to make better use of available spectrum resources fueled the development of a second generation of wireless technologies (also commonly referred to as 2G technologies).This second generation marked the transition to a fully digital technology, providing enhanced quality and enabling better use of spectrum resources.
Level 5 aggregates the key benefits of research in broad areas of national concern.Concerning economic impact, the strong telecommunications industry, new spin-off industries, and more competitive industries (across the board) result in a higher GDP for the country, as well as job creation.Technological leadership and economic strength also help ensure strong leadership and capability in national defense and homeland security.The full benefits of the process depicted in Figure 1.1 develop over an extended period of time, with a long-term buildup over several years between the seed investments in research and realization of the ultimate bottom-line benefits.Each step takes time: from innovation to mass deployment and impact.Investments by both government and industry in research by academia and industry lead to both short- and long-term contributions.Over the years, CSTB studies have documented this phenomenon across multiple areas of information technology and telecommunications research.In particular, its 1995 report Evolving the High Performance Computing and Communications Initiative to Support the Nation’s Information Infrastructure9 and a 2003 update10 illustrate how long-term investments in research across academia and industry have led to the creation of many new, important U.S. industry segments with revenues that came to exceed $1 billion.In closing, it is worth noting the perils of losing leadership in telecommunications.
In the early 1970s, following years of resistance to the idea, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) began setting aside a range of radio frequencies for radio telephony.Near the end of that decade, a trial of cellular phone technology had been conducted in Chicago, and the world’s first commercial cellular phone service was introduced in Tokyo, Japan.By the early 1980s, the FCC was issuing wireless telephony licenses and setting up metropolitan and rural jurisdictions (so-called metropolitan statistical areas and rural service areas), and, by the middle of the decade, first-generation wireless systems were being deployed in the United States.These systems were based on analog cellular technology using the advanced mobile phone system (or AMPS) technology that had been developed by Bell Labs.Cellular technology was being deployed in other countries, as well, although the technology and standards adopted internationally were very different from those used in the United States.Thus began one of today’s most vibrant and competitive industries—competition among wireless providers in today’s market is fierce, and new products and services emerge almost on a daily basis now.All of the participants in the telecommunications value chain could, in principle, invest in research, but the nature of those investments would likely differ because of varying motivations and incentives.Traditionally, investments in research by end users (the demand side)15 seeking to improve the technologies available from providers and vendors (the supply side) have been the primary source of fundamental and long-time-horizon results that are much more likely to enter the public domain, making them available to all and increasing their impact.
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