Robert Sanchez

Robert Sanchez

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The social media marketing week in review: A round up of news and announcements you may have missed. Please visit Search Engine Land for the full article.
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By Paige O’Neill, CMO, Sitecore Marketing teams are under increasing pressure to accelerate toward higher levels of omnichannel content maturity. Mimicking the success of industry leaders such as Amazon, Spotify and Netflix isn’t the only reason, either. Instead, having a mature content strategy and delivery process directly impacts a brand’s ability to attract and retain […] The post How brands can accelerate content maturity for competitive strength appeared first on Digiday.
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Posted by MeganRoseMDigital advertising is different nowadays. How and when we interact with ads online drastically changed in March when COVID-19 ushered in a new era of rolling global lockdowns, not to mention lifestyle changes that none of us could predict. And for native advertising in particular, ad performance has always relied on the nature of consumer behavior on the sites where they appear. Because they fit the form and function of their sites, their best practices are directly dictated by how we interact with the organic content that surrounds them. On editorial sites (think news, niche blogs and online magazines), consumer behavior has shifted quite a bit. People started interacting with content from different devices, at different times, and reacting to different types of campaign creatives. All of this resulted in a new set of best practices for marketers to follow when it comes to running effective native ads. We’ll walk you through those new best practices and answer the following: How have native ads been impacted by COVID-19?How has consumer interaction with native ads changed?What campaign messaging is the most effective?What KPIs are other advertisers in your vertical targeting?What creative strategies perform best? COVID-19's impact on news sites and native ads There was a whole lot of uncertainty this past March, and as a result, many companies pumped the advertising breaks. Despite the slowdown, the industry will spend more on native ads in 2020 than they did in 2019, but at a much smaller growth rate. According to eMarketer, $47.33 billion will be spent on native ads in 2020 — a 4.8% growth spurt. They expect native ad spend to grow by 21% as digital ad spend recovers next year. The ads that did run, though, saw a lot of attention. The coronavirus news cycle brought a boom of interest to editorial sites across the web from March to April. Nieman Lab reported that articles about the pandemic increased overall traffic to 350% week over week, totalling 980 million views. When the dust settled, it was clear consumer priorities had shifted, and where and when they were spending time on editorial sites did, too. Where and when consumers interact with native ads Editorial sites have the potential to serve native ads in a lot of different places. They can appear as promoted articles on a homepage or category page, as native display ads in the middle of an article, and at the bottom of the article, to name a few examples. We partnered with Nielsen using BrainVu, a cloud-based neurocognition technology, to measure consumer reactions to ads on the page, meaning we physically measured people's brain waves as they interacted with ads on editorial sites. Immersive AI and virtual reality technology (think headgear with a ton of wires attached) measured when and where they were paying the most attention and had the highest emotional response. We found that consumers were paying 20% more attention to ads at the bottom of the article and had a 17% higher emotional response than anywhere else on the page. Plus, research participants displayed an 8% lower cognitive load at the end of an article. Basically, they had more “brain space”, or memory resources, to pay attention to new content or ads. A follow-up study from Nielsen revealed that these moments occurred most often as we were on our way to bed or just waking up, taking a work break, or using the restroom. Lunch breaks, lines, and commutes had been deprioritized. When we're in those moments of next, primed and ready to discover content or advertising from brands, what are the topics engaged with the most? We've seen three major shifts in consumer interest that should shape the messaging for your next native advertising campaigns. Campaign messaging people engage with the most The news topics gaining the most attention on editorial sites have changed, which should signal to marketers a need for a shift in native ad messaging. Long-term trends in news are a reflection of consumers most relevant and immediate concerns. Aligning your campaign messaging with these long-term trends will improve your native ad performance. So, what are those long-term trends? First off, content related to the coronavirus and political climate has all but eclipsed consumer attention on editorial sites. Underneath those high-level basic interests, we've identified four trending topics that have emerged since the coronavirus was declared a pandemic, and with which we're seeing a lot of engagement: Investing: The combination of coronavirus and the 2020 election has resulted in some ups and downs in the stock market, and everyone wants to jump on the bandwagon. (Nerdwallet pushed a partnership with Fundrise just in time for the trend).Food: Quarantine baking has resulted in a burst of attention to the food category, specifically for topics related to desserts and baking. (Just Egg leaned into marketing as a faux egg alternative when quarantine baking took off.)Racism: George Floyd's murder and the Black Lives Matter movement have sparked a recent increase in engagement with topics related to racism and equality. (Mint promoted a webinar and video series on how to close the racial wage gap.)Work: How and when we're getting back to work is on our minds. (Nestlé released a series of content, including this article, about how parents were handling working from home.) Here's how interest in these content topics have broken down over the past six months, measured in pageviews: While specific news stories have created spikes of pageviews for content related to these topics, interest has stayed steady for all four since April. How coronavirus influenced native advertising KPIs Native advertising KPIs shifted after COVID-19 was declared a global pandemic. To illustrate this change, we took a look at the total advertiser spend on our network across each vertical, and broke it down by three high-level KPIs: brand awareness, lead generation, and purchases. If the percentage of spend allocated to one of those KPIs changed more than 5% after March or April, we included it here. Brand Awareness Brand awareness includes campaigns optimized for KPIs like impressions, clicks, and pageviews. For the fashion and technology verticals, brand awareness became a much higher priority after March 8th. Lead generation Lead generation includes KPIs like form fills, engagement on the page, or newsletter subscriptions. Both the entertainment and auto industries prioritized lead generation just after the pandemic was declared. They eventually focused more on brand awareness by April, when a need for education and finance products took their place. As consumers looked to support schooling at home, and make sure their finances were in order, education and finance brands started to prioritize lead generation over other KPIs. Purchase Purchase KPIs include cart checkouts, contacting a sales representative, or any digital step in the funnel that results in a sale. Directly after the pandemic hit, healthcare and home good brands prioritized purchase KPIs as consumers looked to stay healthy and improve their inside spaces. Healthcare has continued to prioritize purchase KPIs since the pandemic was announced. Moving into April, more and more education marketers also prioritized purchase KPIs to support homeschooling and professional development needs. Beauty advertisers also filled a need left by closing salons across the globe. Fashion marketers started prioritizing purchase KPIs again through April as it became clear how consumer priorities had shifted. Creative best practices since coronavirus When pen meets paper (figuratively speaking) and it's time to build your campaign creatives, you'll want to be sure to include creative elements that consumers find engaging. Below you’ll find insights for native ads that are either driven by sponsored content (think articles, e-books, photo galleries, and videos on the landing page) and video (think video creatives where a click isn't necessarily the goal). Sponsored content These ads are made up of a headline and photo to entice consumers to click and learn more about what you have to offer. Both require a bit of attention to make sure your ad performs as best as it can. We're seeing increases in click-through-rates (CTRs) for the following photo elements: Photos without text Photography over illustrations People over landscapes Colors over black and white​ Close-ups over photos at a distance We recommend A/B testing photos with one or two of these elements to see what works best for your campaign. Keywords After your photo catches your eye, your headline has to convince people to click and keep reading. We've seen certain keywords give advertisers a better chance at a user clicking through to their landing page. Over the past month, the following keywords have had a positive impact on CTRs: These keywords used to have a positive impact on CTR, but are now used in many different ad campaigns, meaning you'll likely have to bid higher in order to get in front of consumers. Finally, these keywords haven't quite made it into the 'strong engagement' bucket, but have had a positive CTR impact for a smaller selection of advertiser campaigns and might be worth testing if relevant to your brand. Video campaigns When producing video assets, there are specific action types and characteristics to include to make an impact on completion rate and viewability. High completion rate Consider showing scenes with swimming, air travel, stretching, and other high-movement related action types to encourage people to watch your video ad all the way to the end. In addition, video characteristics like winter scenes, men, videos without people, and food are also showing a positive impact on completion rates. High viewability When it comes to catching someone's eye, actions like eating, climbing, and stretching seem to be the most effective. Male actors, videos that aren't illustrated, colors, and food are also great characteristics to include to make sure your video isn't missed. Main takeaways ​The native advertising landscape has changed since March and the declaration of a global pandemic. Ad spend changed in response to consumer behavior, and we walked away with a new set of best practices to use as a basis for our native advertising campaigns. When you're building your next native advertising campaign, ask yourself: Can I incorporate a messaging angle related to investing, food, racial justice or work?Are other advertisers seeing success with my desired KPI in my vertical?Have I considered testing native ad placements at the bottom of the page where people are most likely to be engaged?Am I following creative best practices like including colorful, close-up images of people? You should always A/B test—best practices should always be taken with a grain of salt. Using these best practices as a basis for testing your native advertising campaigns moving forward will make your optimization process a bit easier, and ultimately lead to better performance marketing. You can stay up to date on the latest content topics and creative trends at Taboola Trends.Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!
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An analysis of the earnings statements from the world's top 10 ad spenders (according to RECMA data from 2019) shows how companies have moved out of rapid-response mode. The post How the world’s biggest advertisers are spending (or not) as industries adapt to the coronavirus pandemic appeared first on Digiday.
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Having detailed insights—and the tools that procure them—into changing consumer behaviors is critical for marketers to demonstrate how effective their efforts are. The post Against market uncertainties, consumer data is marketers’ secret weapon appeared first on ClickZ.
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Today we’re taking a peek at Apple’s latest earnings report with a breakdown of net sales by each device category. Apple continued to report net sales in five categories, including iPhone, Mac, iPad, Services, and a category that combined Wearables, Home, and Accessories. Each category rose this quarter in both 3-month and 12-month comparisons year-over-year except the most massive of … Continue reading
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In a press release touting the scientific achievements of Trump's presidency, the White House claimed his administration had ended the pandemic.
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The Google Pixel 5 takes some great photos, but the camera is starting to show its age. The next Pixel needs new hardware.
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SpaceX has conducted several test flights of its Starship prototype, and so far, they’ve all flown only a portion of the rocket. Previous test flights have lacked the nosecone where one day payloads and perhaps astronauts will sit. SpaceX is gearing up for another test flight, and this time it’s attaching the nosecone on top of the rocket. The coming … Continue reading
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Downing Street has refused to praise dozens of businesses that have offered to feed the country’s poorest children in response to Marcus Rashford’s anti-hunger campaign.Starting on Thursday night, the England footballer – who has spent months campaigning to stop child hunger through school holidays – shared posts from businesses and groups nationwide that are volunteering free food for children who may otherwise go hungry.From free sandwiches, sausages and curries to the offer of taxis to the nearest available foodbank, dozens of posts have now been shared online as millions of families face a half term of potential hardship. Some 322 Tory MPs on Wednesday voted down a motion to extend free school meals to the holidays.Asked whether Boris Johnson would praise those firms offering food, a No.10 spokesperson dodged the question and instead told reporters: “We’ve set out our position a number of times.“There’s no change.“As we have set out before we’re in a different position now with schools back open to all and the vast majority of pupils back in school.“And I believe the PM said during PMQs free school meals will continue during term time and he wants to continue to support families throughout the crisis and there is cash available to feed kids if they need to.”Asked whether the prime minister would applaud councils that have got involved of their own volition, he appeared to criticise them, saying: “Whilst schools continue to play an integral role in the community it’s not for schools to regularly provide food to pupils during school holidays.” And he added, again: “As we’ve said before, we’re in a different position now with schools back open.“But we have done a lot to make sure the most vulnerable in our society are protected and that has included extending free school meals to support those eligible when schools were partially closed during lockdown, increasing universal credit by £20 a week, and £63m funding for councils to provide emergency assistance to families with food, essentials and meals.”Pressed a third time on whether the PM would praise or applaud those offering meals, the spokesperson responded: “The PM’s answered this question himself on Wednesday. You’ve got his words from Wednesday.”The prime minister did not answer anything of the sort on Wednesday. Downing Street was referring to Johnson’s comments during prime minister’s questions, when he refused three times to agree to extending free meal support – as he did through a voucher scheme in the summer – over the coming holiday periods.“We support kids on low incomes in school and we will continue to do so,” he told MPs on Wednesday.“What I want to do is to make sure we continue to support families through the crisis.”When asked directly by Labour MP George Howarth whether he would support the plan to extend meals to next Easter, Johnson replied: “What we want to do is continue to support people on low incomes throughout the crisis and that’s what we are going to do.”Related... Five Baffling Reasons Tories Have Given For Voting Against Free School Meals Tories Voted Against Free School Meals In Revenge For 'Scum' Comment, Nicky Morgan Suggests Opinion: Angela Rayner Was Right To Give Scummy Behaviour The Name It Deserves
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Microsoft is really pushing its Xbox game streaming, both with “local” Remote Play as well as cloud gaming via Xbox Game Pass Ultimate, previously known as Project xCloud. But while the likes of Google’s Stadia initially aimed from TVs via the Chromecast, Xbox cloud gaming prioritized a more mobile experience. Gaming on smartphones, however, doesn’t always have the same feel, … Continue reading
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You can sign out of your Yahoo Mail account in a web browser by clicking your profile icon, or in the mobile app from the "Manage accounts" menu.
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Here are the top media and advertising stories from Business Insider for October 22.
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Much like any colony, the overall goal is to be independent and still manage to survive, notes experts.
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Not a steak, but if you're going midrange there's enough to chew on Review  You get a lot of phone for less than £300 these days. Just look at the Realme 7 and 7 Pro, which recently splashed down in Europe. These devices are the OPPO sister brand's latest bid for the middle-tier mobile market. They don't push any envelopes, but they are excellent value for money.…
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Some retailers are afraid of reviews and feedback, but they should see them as valuable assets and opportunities to show credibility. The post Customers are trying new retailers. Use their feedback to win the sale appeared first on ClickZ.
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Phablets might be the biggest craze, but if you want to do more with your touchscreen, then a laptop is the smart buy and we've rounded up the best.
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Posted by Dr-PeteWhen business is struggling, budgets are tight, and resources limited, your company might be tempted to cut back or cut off SEO efforts to save time and money until things stabilize. But halting SEO altogether — even for a short time — is actually a bad idea, as it means more work for you and your business in the long run.  Dr. Pete is here with a brand new Whiteboard Friday to tell you why SEO should not be treated like an on/off switch, and provide some suggestions on what to do instead.  Click on the whiteboard image above to open a high resolution version in a new tab! Video Transcription Hey, everybody, Dr. Pete from Moz here. I want to welcome you to my first recording from Whiteboard Friday Studio Chicago, aka my basement. I want to thank the content team, first of all, for getting me set up with the equipment, but especially for their patience. I am not an AV guy, so this has taken a little while longer than I had hoped. You've already seen some remote Whiteboard Fridays from Russ and Britney and Cyrus, and they're doing a great job. So hopefully we can have some fun, and now I know the ropes and can get this going a little easier.  So I want to talk about a serious topic today. Obviously, we're going through some tough times. Budgets can be tight, and when that happens, you're tempted to scale back marketing. Obviously, we're in the business of selling SEO tools, and we don't want you to do that because that's where our food comes from and the roofs over our heads. I'll be transparent about that. But I do think there are some real dangers to treating SEO like it's an on/off switch. So I want to talk about the reality of that, and what can happen, and some of what to do to mitigate that.  You can't do more with less A friend reached out to me and she said, "My boss is worried about budgets, and he wants to cut back paid search, and he wants to cut back content, and cut back social, but get the same results. What do we do?" Before the pandemic, I might have laughed at that. But it's a serious question and a serious situation, and the reality is there's no magic to this. We can't expect to do more with less. It's a nice thing to say. But especially when people are struggling, and when our workers are having problems, and they're stressed, and their time is being taken up doing mundane things — like grocery shopping — that are three times harder now, we can't expect them to do more with less, and we can't expect to do nothing and get results. So what do we do, and how do we deal with this problem? You can't treat organic like paid  So first of all, I just want to say that I think sometimes we look at the situation like this. If we scale back marketing, we can just wait until times are better, and then we can push it back up. So we turn on our search marketing. We get the traffic and things are great. We shut it off. Okay, that sucks. We don't get the traffic, but we're not paying. Turn it back on and boom the traffic is back.  That's not how it works, not even close.  This is more like how paid search works. I don't want to oversimplify. I used to work in paid search. Obviously, you're optimizing and improving and adding negative keywords and doing A/B testing and all these things to hopefully get better and better performance. But, generally speaking, one of the advantages of paid search is that when you turn it on, the leads come. You get traffic right away that day. When you turn it off, you get nothing. The money is not there. You don't get the leads. Okay, that's rough, but you expect that, right? But you turn it back on, the leads come back that day. So this is the double-edged sword in a sense. It's not that one is better than the other, but this is how paid search works. It's a machine that you can flip off and on.  That's not how organic works. Organic does take time. So what happens is you turn it on, and you see this gradual ramp-up. Finally, it starts to peak and level off, and then you turn it off. Let's say budgets are tight. Okay, I understand that you're not producing new content and you're not optimizing. It's not a thing you can just turn off frankly. But you still see positive results. You still see that traffic until this starts to trail off over time. Now that's a good thing about SEO. It doesn't immediately turn off. You still continue to get that traffic. But the problem with SEO is when you turn it back on and when the money comes back, you're going to have to go through this ramp-up again. The curve may be different shapes, and it may not go all the way down and it may not go back to where it was. But it's going to take time. There's going to be a lag, and it could be weeks or it could be months. So I think we make two mistakes. One we've already discussed. One is number two ironically, that this is going to take time to come back. So if you count on just turning the switch back on and things recovering, you're going to be disappointed, right? That's going to take time. So it's not just a situation of a pandemic. Let's say you close down for remodeling or let's say you had some kind of flooding or some kind of damage or something you needed to do to shut down for a month or two. You can't expect that, when you turn things back on, it will immediately come back. So you may have to get ahead of that. You may have to start spending again before things pick up. I know that's a difficult thing, but you have to anticipate this lag. You have to be realistic about that. The other problem, though, is I think sometimes we hit this point, and we shut off our efforts. We cut down content production. We don't optimize. We switch agencies, whatever we do. We don't see an immediate drop, and so we start to say maybe this isn't really working. I think it's a bit like exercise. I have this habit certainly over the years. You get motivated. You do really well for a few weeks or a couple of months. You're feeling good, and you start to plateau. You get a little frustrated, and then you stop. For a while, you still feel good, right? You have these dividends. That's how it works, and that's how organic search works. So you think, well, maybe it wasn't that big of a deal. Maybe it wasn't really helping me. Until two or three or six months later, when you realize how much worse you feel. Then by then, to start back up again takes effort, right? You don't feel good when you start exercising again after that six weeks of sitting around. So it takes a couple of months to get back to where you were. So I don't want you to go through that, and I want you to be a bit careful about that. What you can do So what can we do? By the way, I have no artistic skills. This is from my 10-year-old daughter. Any drawings you see on my Whiteboard Fridays will be probably from her. So thank you, Jordan. So a couple suggestions I have that are general. 1. Have a pulse First of all, and I mean this quite literally, you need to continue to have a pulse. If you shut down your business or your marketing, you may just think, "Well, okay, we're going to get less leads. We're going to get less of a good thing, but nothing bad is going to happen".  But the problem is this may be the only place people see you, and this may be where they come looking for you. So if you disappear, and especially in an environment like the pandemic where businesses are going under, people may look at that and say, "Oh, I guess they're not around anymore. I guess they're gone." They might not come back. They might not come looking for you again. I think there's a very real danger of that, especially for small local businesses. So you want to make sure that your presence at least continues to exist. You have that pulse.  It doesn't have to be as frequent — you don't have to do as much work, you don't have to put out as much content, you don't have to be as active on social — but I think you have to at least show people that you're still alive and kicking so that they know to come back when things improve. Otherwise, they might just forget and go somewhere else.  2. Tell your story I think it's okay, especially during times like this — and really any time that something is kind of going wrong — if you're remodeling, you're going to be closed for a couple months. That's a real negative thing that's hard. It's okay to be personal. It's okay to tell some of that story. My kids' orthodontist, they're a family-owned business locally here. They were really great when they were closed. They were closed for a couple of months, about two or three months. They were as responsible as I think they could be about it. They communicated their plans, but they talked to us. They sent emails. They told us about their story. They told us about being a family-owned business and why this was hard and why they thought it was the right thing to do. So when they reopened, there was a real trust there, and I was willing to send my oldest back and get her checked out and get the normal stuff done, that I might not have been if I wasn't sure what was going on. But I knew their procedures. I knew their story. I empathized with them, and I think that was a big deal. That's something you should do. It's okay to tell that, "Hey, this is hard. This is what's going on. Here's what's going on with us. We hope you come back. We're still here." 3. Try new things Then I think this is an interesting time to try new things. And maybe that sounds counterintuitive because when you have less money, trying something new seems like a bad idea. But it's okay to try new things. Maybe not as well as you normally would have. Ironically, this is a problem we've had with Whiteboard Friday. I've been remote my whole time at Moz, and so I've had to fly to Seattle to do recordings. So you see very few Whiteboard Fridays from me. There's a handful over the years and one that gets repeated a bit. Because we have a studio there, we were afraid that the quality might not be as good. It might not be up to par. It might hurt our brand, honestly. But when the pandemic came, we said, "Hey, you know what? Now we have no choice. The studio is closed. We can't go into the office for a while." Actually, currently we're moving the office, so again we're delayed. So it opened up this opportunity to try something new, try something different. Even with equipment, it costs less than one of us flying out there and staying for a few days one time. So it made sense, and we realized that during this time people were going to naturally be forgiving. If we could get to 70% or 80% quality and improve back up over time, it was going to be okay. So I encourage you to do that. Try some formats you might not have tried before. Try some video. Use some basic equipment. We did home recordings for MozCon this year. It was great. We had some basic equipment, Logitech web cam, a clip-on USB mic, much less sophisticated than what I'm using right now, a couple of ring lights. Maybe 200 bucks' worth of equipment and a backdrop that really I thought looked great. It was really professional once we got used to it. Try podcasting. Try something you haven't tried before. Don't worry about it being perfect, because I think this is a time that people will be okay with that. You can try some new things and hopefully come out stronger and come out with a new thing and resume what you were doing and maybe be ahead of where you were. So again, I just don't want you to think that if you turn this thing off, you can flip it back on. Be realistic. Don't disappear. Try something new. Tell people what you're going through. Be human. I hope you all get through this okay and that things are going all right. It's great to see you. Thank you. Video transcription by Speechpad.com Sign up for The Moz Top 10, a semimonthly mailer updating you on the top ten hottest pieces of SEO news, tips, and rad links uncovered by the Moz team. Think of it as your exclusive digest of stuff you don't have time to hunt down but want to read!
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Our topic will be “Finding certainty in IT when the world is uncertain.”
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The Indian antitrust watchdog is looking into a complaint that Google abused its dominant market position in smart television operating system.
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