Terry Fulmer

Terry Fulmer

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Samsung has announced the Galaxy A42 5G, the latest in its lineup of more reasonably priced and lower-specced A-series phones. The A42 is now Samsung’s cheapest phone with 5G, selling for £349 (about $455 USD). That puts it £80 below the Galaxy A51 5G, which was previously the cheapest way to buy into Samsung’s 5G lineup at £429 (or priced at $500 USD in the US). The Galaxy A42 uses the Snapdragon 750G, a middle-of-the-pack processor that was just announced by Qualcomm last month. It’s supposed to be a step up from the Snapdragon 730G, seen in phones like the Pixel 4A, but it isn’t quite as powerful as the Snapdragon 765G, seen in the Pixel 4A 5G and OnePlus Nord. Images: Samsung The phone has a 6.6-inch OLED display... Continue reading…
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US military dogs outfitted with augmented reality goggles will be able to get commands from a distance, and soldiers can follow everything the animal sees in real time.
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Carter is the only person to represent the 31st District since its formation in 2003, and could be facing his toughest reelection yet.
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Using a network of sensors, researchers found that the Los Angeles high-rises most likely to rock in a future quake aren’t downtown.
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Microsoft is testing out a new Web Capture feature in its Dev/Canary builds of Edge.
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It turns on a dime, but there's a lot of roll in the corners.
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Contact tracers are still scrambling to reach around 23,500 people after an IT error meant thousands of Covid-19 cases were not logged on government computers, Matt Hancock has admitted. The health secretary was speaking in the Commons after the shock disclosure that almost 16,000 lab-confirmed cases had been overlooked for more more than a week. Experts estimate that 48,000 people who came into contact with someone infected were not alerted as a result. Hancock said that as of 9am on Monday, contact tracers had only reached 51% of the missing cases’ close contacts – meaning some 23,500 have still not been alerted to their risk of having the potentially deadly disease. Amid accusations from Labour that the government was “failing on the basics”, Hancock blamed Public Health England’s “legacy” computer systems and said tracers were working overtime to correct the cock-up. He told MPs an investigation was underway and added: “Contact tracing of these cases began first thing Saturday. We brought in 6,500 hours of extra contact tracing over the weekend and I can report to the House as of 9am today 51% of the cases have now been contacted a second time for contact tracing purposes.“I want to reassure the House that outbreak control in care homes, schools and hospitals has not been directly affected because dealing with outbreaks in these settings does not primarily rely on this PHE system.”The UK’s total number of confirmed cases has now surpassed 500,000. Shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth said problems with testing were “putting lives at risk”, adding Hancock “should apologise”.He added: “In recent weeks we’ve had people told to travel hundreds of miles for a test, we’ve had hundreds of children out of school unable to get a test. We’ve had tracers sitting idle watching Netflix. We’ve had care home tests taking days to be processed.“Yesterday we had a health minister saying this could be a moment of national pride like the Olympics. We’ve had a prime minister in a complete muddle over the rules and now, at one of the most crucial points in this pandemic, we learn that almost 16,000 positive cases went unreported for a week.“That means as many as 48,000 contacts not traced and not isolating. Thousands of people blissfully unaware they’ve been exposed to Covid potentially spreading this deadly virus at a time when hospital admissions are increasing and we’re in the second wave.“This isn’t just a shambles, it’s so much worse than this, and it gives me no comfort to say it, but it’s putting lives at risk and he should apologise when he responds.”Ashworth renewed calls for the government to reconsider outsourcing giant Serco’s role in NHS Test and Trace. He added: “Surely now is the time to not renew Serco’s contract and instead give responsibility and resources to NHS labs and local public health teams to deliver testing and tracing?”Hancock, who sidestepped the invitation to apologise, also faced calls to publish criteria for when local lockdowns could be lifted, adding some areas felt restrictions were “like Hotel California – you can check out but you can never leave – and families deserve answers”. Related... Austerity Helped Government Respond To Coronavirus, Says Rishi Sunak Tory Rebellion Threat As MPs Get Vote On Covid-19 'Rule Of Six' A Second National Lockdown Seems Inevitable. Here's What Stands In The Way
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Apple claims in the suit that it sent more than 530,000 iPhones, 25,000 iPads, and 19,200 Apple Watches to the Ontario-based GEEP from 2015 to 2017.
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It was the first electric car we ever reviewed, but it was not good.
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Losing support for Android and Google services could be 'damaging' to Chinese firms, the report notes.
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Emergency teams in Washington State have been harnessing SpaceX’s Starlink internet technology to provide connectivity in areas devastated by wildfires.
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As the pandemic continues to keep employees at home, many tech companies are starting to accommodate the challenges faced by working parents.
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Earlier this week, Amazon unveiled Amazon One: new technology for its Amazon Go stores that lets shoppers pay for their groceries by scanning the palm of their hand. By analyzing the shape of your hand and the unique configuration of veins under your skin, Amazon says its technology can verify your identity the same way facial recognition does. Although Amazon One will initially be used for payments only, it’s clear the tech giant has much bigger ambitions for this hardware. In the future, it says, Amazon One could not only be used for shopping but as a replacement for tickets at music and sporting events, and as an alternative to your office keycard, letting you scan in with a swipe of your hand. In other words, Amazon One isn’t a... Continue reading…
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