Thomas Saysongkham

Thomas Saysongkham

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Android fans should have even more features and updates to look forward to real soon.
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Well, R.I.P. the PS4 controller… kind of. Sony today revealed in an official PlayStation blog post which PS4 peripherals can still be used with the upcoming PlayStation 5. While some peripherals will carry over, the PS4 controller won’t, at least not when it comes to playing the new games. The company says, in response to the question of whether the DualShock 4 controller will work with PS5 games: “No, we believe that PS5 games should take advantage of the new capabilities and features we’re bringing to the platform, including the features of DualSense wireless controller.” Read: A eulogy for my deceased… This story continues at The Next Web
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Clearance special on aisle 6! These well-equipped wearables won't last long at this price.
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Should you buy the standard AirPods or the AirPods Pro? Here's how Apple's truly wireless earbuds stack up.
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Here's a look at our most important stories for the week ending Aug. 1.
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Duke's Twitter account was "permanently suspended" for violating the company's policy against hateful conduct, a spokesperson for the social network says.
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Sendo believes Vietnam's ecommerce market is large enough to accommodate several key players, the company's CFO said.
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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company has "adapted features" from competitors during Wednesday's big tech antitrust hearing. Rep. Pramila Jayapal, Democrat of Washington, asked Zuckerberg whether Facebook had copied features from rivals as part of its competitive strategy. Jayapal pressed Zuckerberg on conversations that occurred during Facebook's acquisition of Instagram, asking whether the company threatened to copy Instagram's features while it attempted to buy it. The exchange was part of an unprecedented antitrust hearing in which CEOs from Facebook, Apple, Amazon, and Google testified before Congress.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said the company has "adapted features" from competitors when confronted about whether the social media giant used unfair practices — including copying features from rivals — to stay ahead of competitors. The exchange was part of an unprecedented antitrust hearing on Wednesday, in which the CEOs of Facebook, Google, Apple, and Amazon testified before Congress as part of an investigation into whether these companies are engaging in anticompetitive business practices.  Zuckerberg said Facebook had "certainly adapted features" from others in response to a question from Rep. Pramila Jayapal, Democrat of Washington, whether the company had copied features from competitors. During her questioning, Jayapal cited emails between Facebook executives about pursuing "aggressive and nimble" tactics to maintain a lead over competing services. She also pressed Zuckerberg about whether the company has ever threatened to clone products from other companies while trying to acquire them. Specifically, she pushed the Facebook CEO on whether the social media giant had used a camera product the firm was developing at the time to threaten Instagram cofounder Kevin Systrom ahead of its $1 billion acquisition of the photo sharing app in 2012. Jayapal referenced a chat in which Zuckerberg told Systrom that Facebook was "developing our own photo strategy, so how we engage now will also determine how much we're partners versus competitors down the line." Systrom told an investor at the time that he worried Zuckerberg would go into "destroy mode" if he didn't sell Instagram to Facebook, Jayapal said. In his response, Zuckerberg disagreed with the characterization that the company had threatened competitors or copied them. "It was clear that this was a space that we were going to compete in one way or another," Zuckerberg said. "I don't view those conversations as a threat in any way." Facebook's acquisition of Instagram and other popular apps like WhatsApp has been a point of interest for regulators throughout the hearing. Rep. Jerry Nadler, a New York Democrat, also referenced emails saying that Facebook acquired Instagram to neutralize a competitor when questioning Zuckerberg earlier in the day.  The questions and Zuckerberg's response come after the tech giant has been accused of copying features from rivals like Snapchat. The company has introduced several features into its app that are similar to those of Snapchat, such as Instagram's "Stories" feature, which is much like Snapchat's "Story" post format. Both features allow you to post a collection photos and videos that disappear after 24 hours. Jayapal referenced Snapchat as well, asking Zuckerberg if Facebook had warned Snap Inc. CEO Evan Spiegel that the company was planning to clone its features while attempting to acquire the company. Zuckerberg pushed back on that claim, reiterating the company's goal.  "People want to be able to communicate privately, they want to be able to communicate with all their friends at once," Zuckerberg said. "And we're going to make sure that we build the best products in all of the spaces we can around helping people stay connected with the people they care about." Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: What makes 'Parasite' so shocking is the twist that happens in a 10-minute sequence
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The dual-screen device was originally set to launch in 'holiday 2020'
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Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge Snap, the company behind Snapchat, released its first diversity report today after years of resisting pressure to make those statistics public. The report details the minimal growth the 3,195-person company has made in regards to hiring people of color and women. Black and African American people only represent 4.1 percent of the entire workforce, the report states, and Hispanic / Latinx people make up 6.8 percent. Both groups account for only 3.2 percent of leadership; Black and African American people make up 2.3 percent of tech roles while Hispanic/LatinX account for 3.4 percent. Meanwhile, women only make up 32.9 percent of Snap’s workforce with only 16 percent in technical roles. Along with the numbers, Snap says it’s setting new... Continue reading…
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Starlink satellites photobombed Comet Neowise in a striking photo. The juxtaposition highlights astronomers' concerns about Elon Musk's internet project. The photo is a composite of 17 images taken over 30 seconds, so it doesn't show what you would see with the naked eye. Still, plenty of astronomy research relies on long-exposure images, and Starlink's streaks of light can ruin scientists' work. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Elon Musk's growing constellation of internet satellites has been sending streaks of bright light across night skies around the world. Even the biggest comet to pass Earth in 25 years wasn't spared.  A striking photo showing Comet Neowise behind those streaks of light shows how easily the satellites can upstage observations of distant objects in space. The satellite project, called Starlink, is Musk's plan to blanket Earth in high-speed satellite internet. The effort has drawn criticism from professional and amateur astronomers, however, because the bright satellites can mar the skies and disrupt telescope observations. That's what happened to astrophotographer Daniel López on July 21, when he was shooting Comet Neowise before it flies out of view for another 6,800 years. He shared the resulting image on the Facebook page of his photography company, El Cielo de Canarias, saying it was a shame to see the satellites make such a spectacle. López's photo is a composite of 17 images taken in the span of 30 seconds. Each image was long-exposure, meaning it captured the comet over several seconds. Astronomer Julien Girard shared the picture on Twitter, saying that the satellites had "completely photobombed" the comet. "Two of my pictures the other night were also bombed by a Starlink [satellite]," Girard said. López also shared the time-lapse video behind the picture. He added that traces of the satellites were visible in 20 of his images. Post by El Cielo de Canarias .   Because it's a composite time-lapse, the image doesn't show what you would see with the naked eye. But it illustrates why many astronomers worry about the threat that satellite constellations like Starlink pose to ground-based astronomy. Too many satellites could mess with astronomy on Earth Long-exposure images are crucial when studying distant objects in the night sky. Telescopes on Earth watch celestial targets for hours, slowly building up a detailed image that offers astronomers rich data. But one poorly timed Starlink satellite can ruin that kind of research by creating a long streak across the image and blocking the objects that astronomers want to study. "In that couple of seconds, a whole 10- or 15-minute exposure is ruined," astronomer Jonathan McDowell told Business Insider in June. SpaceX is sharing Starlink's orbital path data with astronomers so that they can plan their telescope observations around the satellites' movements. Briefly shutting off the camera as the satellite passes overhead can save a long-exposure image. But Musk's ambitions could make it nearly impossible to avoid the fast-moving satellites. SpaceX has sought government permission to put a total of 42,000 satellites into orbit to form a "megaconstellation" around Earth.  "If they're coming over all the time, then knowing when they're coming over isn't helpful," McDowell said. Even now, he added, sometimes astronomers can't avoid the photobombers. SpaceX isn't the only company building a massive fleet of satellites. Companies like OneWeb and Amazon have similar ambitions. "The sky will not be what it has been for millions of years. Thousands of dots will appear and disappear in the night sky," López told Gizmodo. "I personally think that if no action is taken, it will be the end of astronomy as we know it from the surface of the Earth." Professional astronomers have given similarly dire warnings.  "The night sky is for everybody, it has been scrutinized and used for millennia," Girard said. "We should cherish it and protect it just like our Earth."SEE ALSO: Comet Neowise, a meteor, and a mysterious aurora-like phenomenon called STEVE all share the night sky in one incredible photo DON'T MISS: Code on SpaceX's Starlink website contains the first official photos of Elon Musk's 'UFO on a stick' — and key details about the satellite-internet project's test program Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Watch the unbelievable death spiral this spacecraft flew around a comet for 2.5 years
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This week, 181 historians signed an open letter demanding that the Home Office correct historical inaccuracies in the handbook which accompanies the UK’s citizenship test. While asking would-be citizens to learn from a biased version of history is worrying, it’s high-time we got rid of this racist test altogether.  Since 2005, adults applying for citizenship in the UK have been required to take the “Life in the United Kingdom” test. It’s a 45-minute exam which requires the applicant to regurgitate a range of pub-quiz style trivia in order to hit the 75% pass-mark. The required reading is a dedicated handbook called “Life in the United Kingdom: A Guide For New Residents.”The share of the book dedicated to the colonialism on which Britain’s wealth is founded is conspicuously slim, and has this week been shown by historians to be characterised by falsehoods and bias designed to whitewash Britain’s past. Asking migrants to demonstrate knowledge of an arbitrary body of facts on which the rest of us are never tested points to a two-tier system, much like the “citizens” and “subjects” of the British Empire.The role of enslaved people in battling and abolishing slavery is erased, as are the resistance movements that precipitated the end of Britain’s colonial rule. (In addition, there isn’t a single Black person depicted in the book, and there are only two images of people of colour across its 180 pages; the Home Office evidently sees whiteness as an important part of life in the UK.) Passing the test does not guarantee citizenship. It’s just one of many hoops that must be jumped through before an application is even considered, a process that costs £1,330 per person. While the removal of misleading content from the UK’s citizenship curriculum looks like a step towards reckoning with the realities of our colonial history, it makes little sense to slightly improve the representation of colonialism within a construct that is itself characterised by colonialism.Related... Anti-Racism Campaigners Told School Curriculum Is 'Already Incredibly Diverse' Asking migrants to demonstrate knowledge of an arbitrary body of facts on which the rest of us are never tested points to a two-tier system, much like the “citizens” and “subjects” of the British Empire. It reminds us that some of us belong, while others must learn to imitate a highly-doctored national self-image.     There are two main routes to UK citizenship: automatic acquisition at birth, or naturalisation as an adult. Given that the world is carved into states, citizenship is critical to a person existing as a visible member of a society and having secure access to state protections. As philosopher Hannah Arendt put it, a stateless person does not have the “right to have rights.”The hundreds of thousands of infants who are granted citizenship automatically at birth have had no opportunity to show commitment to, or knowledge of, the polity, and are never asked to demonstrate their competence or commitment. What justification can be given for granting citizenship routinely to an oblivious infant, but withholding it from an adult who has knowingly requested it? If the logic is that growing up in the UK means that one somehow imbibes the culture, that seems misguided, because people do not merely receive cultures, they build them, change them, struggle against them. Cultures are not static or homogenous, they are bricolages of which new citizens become authors. To speak of British culture and history as learnable monoliths that can be summarised by the Home Office is not only to gloss over the reality that experiences of life in Britain are diffracted by race and class, it is also to ignore the fact that, precisely because of its colonial past, British culture and history is bound up with that of would-be citizens. The citizenship test should be revoked as a first step to undoing the moral vanity of “Britishness” which underwrites our increasingly hostile environment for migrants and people of colour.Britain’s imperialism has defined the modern history of almost all the common countries of origin of those seeking citizenship in the UK, among them: India, Pakistan, Nigeria, Bangladesh, Nepal, South Africa, and Somalia. Since Britain has long featured in these migrants’ lives without their consent, and against their interests, being granted UK citizenship is better understood as reparation, rather than an act of benevolent inclusion. Moreover, these migrants have much to teach Britain about its own history. Instead of testing them, we would do better as a nation to learn from them. Why not ask Iranians or Palestinians to tell us about the history of British imperialism, ask Indians about famines and massacre, Iraqis about invasion, or Kenyans about genocide? There’s a second sense in which not all UK citizenship is alike, and it relates to a story that’s also currently in the news. Shamima Begum, who as a 15-year-old left her home in Bethnal Green to join ISIS (and ended up in a refugee camp, having watched her three children die), was last year stripped of her British citizenship. Earlier this month she was granted the right to return to the UK to fight her case. Begum has fallen victim to a racist change of law that took place in 2014 making it easier to revoke the citizenship of those who gained it through their own naturalisation, or through parents who were naturalised.Related... Opinion: Shamima Begum Should Never Have Been Disowned In essence, the citizenship of migrants is never really secure, but is conditional, and readily weaponised. Not all citizens are equal; how you got your citizenship is never forgotten. New citizens should of course have opportunities to learn about the UK political system and other state institutions, but these competencies ought to be as optional as they are for everyone else. Requiring migrants to prove their knowledge of and commitment to “British values” compels them to engage with and become complicit in Britain’s delusions about itself, which is particularly morally troubling given that so many have left countries decimated by British colonialism and neo-colonialism. The UK citizenship test is the empire’s last overt “civilizing mission” for racialized others. Its function is to place one more exasperating barrier before Britain’s unwanted migrants, to make them grovel for their seat at the table by proving that they like us, and that they are like us. Like the sociopathic stepmother’s obsequious looking glass in Snow White, Britain holds up its trick mirror and asks “who is the greatest of them all?” as its latest aspirants dutifully echo its mythology. The citizenship test should be revoked as a first step to undoing the moral vanity of “Britishness” which underwrites our increasingly hostile environment for migrants and people of colour. It’s time to definitively break that mirror and confront the many unflattering images it casts. Arianne Shahvisi is senior lecturer in ethics at the Brighton and Sussex Medical School. Related... Islamic State Bride Shamima Begum Should Be Allowed To Return To UK, Court Rules Will Local Lockdowns Be The Story Of The Summer? The Government Is Asking Retired Windrush Nurses To Rejoin The NHS. Here's How They Feel Priti Patel Hints At British Citizenship For Migrant Health Workers
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The ASUS Republic of Gamers crew revealed the ROG Phone 3 this morning with a giant collection of accessories and peripherals for gaming. This device has a new range of modular accessories like the ROG TwinView 3 Dock, ROG Lighting Armor Case, ROG Kunai 3 Gamepad, and the ROG Clip. This phone also rolls with a ROG Strix XG16 portable … Continue reading
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Go behind the scenes of the Marvel universe with this new Disney Plus documentary appearing at Comic-Con this week.
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Swedish kit vendor Ericsson has won at least part of the gig to deploy Deutsche Telekom’s 5G RAN and may end up doing the lot.
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The company's latest consumer projector looks better than ever and even offers a 240-Hz refresh rate for PC gamers.
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When Microsoft created Teams to compete with then rising communication star Slack, it probably didn’t predict a workplace that would instantly become practically virtual because of a pandemic. That has become an opportunity and a motivation for the company to quickly push out features that will help workers, managers, and employers adjust to what has been dubbed as the new … Continue reading
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The United States Army has awarded BAE Systems with a $179 million contract to develop its next-generation Missile Warning System (MWS), the company has announced. Under this contract, BAE Systems will operate under the US Army’s Limited Interim Missile Warning System Quick Reaction Capability (LIMWS QRC) program. The company will provide the military with its first two production lots of … Continue reading
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These bright spots could solve a longstanding mystery about the Sun’s scorching outer layers.
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  Disney Plus offers streaming access to a large collection of Marvel movies, along with brand-new original programming that takes fans deeper into the Marvel universe.   It costs $6.99 a month or $69.99 a year, and you can also also bundle Disney Plus with Hulu and ESPN+ for $12.99 a year. Here are all the Marvel movies and shows you can stream on Disney Plus, including upcoming series, like "The Falcon and the Winter Soldier, "WandaVision," and "Loki." For more detailed thoughts on the Disney Plus service, you can read our full Disney Plus review here. One of the biggest draws of Disney Plus is the huge library of Marvel movies you can watch right now. On top of the existing collection, several exclusive new Marvel shows are in the works as well. Classics, like "Iron Man," as well as upcoming shows, like "Loki," will all be in one place for unlimited streaming.  More than 10 million people signed up for Disney Plus on the first day of its launch. Analysts predict that 18 million will sign up by the end of 2020, and Disney execs project anywhere from 60 million to 90 million global subscribers by 2024.  Updated on 7/16/2020 by Steven Cohen: We've updated this article to include information about which Marvel movies from 20th Century Fox are available on Disney Plus. Added a link to our full review of Disney Plus. What is Disney Plus and how much does it cost? Disney Plus is Disney's ad-free streaming service with tons of movies and TV shows from Disney, Pixar, Marvel, Star Wars, National Geographic, and 20th Century Fox. A monthly subscription costs $6.99/month, and an annual subscription costs $69.99 a year. A seven-day trial was originally offered for new subscribers, but this promotion is no longer available. There's also a $12.99 bundle with ESPN+ and Hulu. Streaming is available on computers, tablets, smartphones, smart TVs, and media players with no limit on downloads (as long as your device has enough storage).  We've broken down everything you need to know about the streaming service over here and all the package prices here. What Marvel movies and shows can I watch? Disney Plus is home to nearly every Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) movie released so far. With that said, certain titles will be added at a later date and a few films, like "Spider-Man: Homecoming," will not be included since they were produced by a different studio. Titles like "Iron Man," "Captain Marvel," and "Avengers: Endgame" are available now, while movies like "Ant-Man and the Wasp" will roll out later this year. Upcoming Marvel films set for theatrical release, like "Black Widow" and "The Eternals," will also arrive on Disney Plus a few months after they hit home video formats. Beyond the studio's movie lineup, new spin-off series focused on various Marvel characters will be available on Disney Plus as well. The first new Marvel shows are set to premiere later this year. Loki will return with more of his mischief in a series aptly named "Loki," the Scarlet Witch will take us on a surreal spin in "WandaVision," and all sorts of alternative realities in the Marvel universe will be explored in the experimental animated series "What If?" There will also be shows centered around characters that are completely new to the MCU, including Ms. Marvel and She-Hulk.  Between major films, exclusive series, and even reality shows, the Marvel library is shaping up quite nicely on Disney Plus. Are "X-Men" and "Fantastic Four" films available on Disney Plus? Though Disney Plus initially launched in the US without any of 20th Century Fox's Marvel movies, the service now includes "X-Men: Days of Future Past" (2014) and "Fantastic Four" (2015).  20th Century Fox produced several Marvel films featuring the X-Men, Fantastic Four, Daredevil, and Deadpool characters before the studio was acquired by Disney in 2019. It's possible that additional Fox movies from these franchises will be added to Disney Plus in the future, though any R-rated films, like "Logan" and "Deadpool", are unlikely to ever be included. Here's a full list of Marvel movies from 20th Century Fox that are still missing from Disney Plus in the US: "X-Men" (2000) "Daredevil" (2003) "X2" (2003) "Elektra" (2005) "Fantastic Four" (2005) "X-Men: The Last Stand" (2006) "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer" (2007) "X-Men Origins: Wolverine" (2009) "X-Men: First Class" (2011) "The Wolverine" (2013) "Deadpool" (2016) "X-Men: Apocalypse" (2016) "Logan" (2017) "Deadpool 2" (2018) "Dark Phoenix" (2019) What order should I watch the Marvel films in? Though different Marvel Studios movies take place at different points in the MCU's timeline, the best order to watch the movies in is the same order that they were originally released in theaters. The filmmakers designed the overarching storyline to be best viewed this way.  A full breakdown of the Marvel movie release timeline can be found below, along with a full rundown of every Marvel film and show available on Disney Plus. Here are all the Marvel movies and shows you can watch on Disney Plus:SEE ALSO: How to get a free week of Disney+, Disney's new ad-free streaming service SEE ALSO: Disney+ costs $7 a month on its own, but you can bundle it with Hulu and ESPN+ for an extra $6 SEE ALSO: All the kids' movies you can stream on Disney+ — from "Snow White" to "Frozen" Marvel movies Product Embed: Product Name: Disney+ Monthly Subscription Service Card Type: small https://produktor.businessinsider.com/productCardService?id=5dc5bb627eece5443d2df8b9&type=small&live=true Width: 100% Height: 150% Below is a complete list of MCU movies in the order they were originally released. This is the order that we recommend watching the films in. Due to existing licensing agreements, some Marvel movies are not yet available on Disney Plus, and certain films are not expected to arrive on the service at all. We've denoted the missing titles in bold, along with details on when/if they are coming to Disney Plus. All of the other movies listed below are available to stream right now on Disney Plus. "Iron Man" (2008) "The Incredible Hulk" (2008) - not planned for Disney Plus "Iron Man 2" (2010)  "Thor" (2011) "Captain America: The First Avenger" (2011) "The Avengers" (2012) "Iron Man 3" (2013) "Thor: The Dark World" (2013) "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" (2014) "Guardians of the Galaxy" (2014) "Avengers: Age of Ultron" (2015) "Ant-Man" (2015) "Captain America: Civil War" (2016) "Doctor Strange" (2016) "Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2" (2017) "Spider-Man: Homecoming" (2017) - not planned for Disney Plus "Thor: Ragnarok" (2017) "Black Panther" (2018) "Avengers: Infinity War" (2018) "Ant-Man and the Wasp" (2018) - coming to Disney Plus on August 14, 2020 "Captain Marvel" (2019) "Avengers: Endgame" (2019) "Spider-Man: Far from Home" (2019) - not planned for Disney Plus In addition to MCU movies, Disney Plus also includes a few Marvel movies from 20th Century Fox. Here are the Marvel movies from Fox that are currently available on Disney Plus in the US: "X-Men: Days of Future Past" (2014) "Fantastic Four" (2015) Marvel TV shows - currently available "Spider-Woman" (1979) "Spider-Man" (1981) "Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends" (1981) "X-Men: The Series" (1992) "Iron Man" (1994) "Fantastic Four" (1994) "Spider-Man"(1994) "The Incredible Hulk" (1996) "The Silver Surfer" (1998) "Avengers: United They Stand" (1999) "Spider-Man Unlimited" (1999) "X-Men: Evolution" (2000) "Fantastic Four: World's Greatest Heroes" (2006) "Iron Man: Armored Adventures" (2008) "Wolverine and the X-Men" (2009) "The Super Hero Squad" (2009) "The Avengers: Earth's Mightiest Heroes" (2010) "Marvel's Ultimate Spider-Man" (2012) "Hulk and the Agents of S.M.A.S.H." (2013) "Avengers Assemble" (2013) "Agent Carter" (2015) "Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy" (2015) "Spider-Man (2017) "Inhumans" (2017) "Runaways" (2017) "Marvel Rising: Secret Warriors" (2018) 'Marvel Hero Project' - now available Product Embed: Product Name: Disney+ Monthly Subscription Service Card Type: small https://produktor.businessinsider.com/productCardService?id=5dc5bb627eece5443d2df8b9&type=small&live=true Width: 100% Height: 150% One of the reality programs on Disney Plus is "Marvel Hero Project," which highlights extraordinary kids who have helped their community. In each episode, the heroic kids get surprised with the honor of being drawn as superheroes in their very own Marvel comic. The comics will then be available via Marvel Unlimited and the Marvel Digital Comic Store for free. 'The Falcon and the Winter Soldier' - TBA 2020 "The Falcon and the Winter Soldier" will be the first of the new onslaught of Marvel shows to hit Disney Plus. The new series reportedly will take place after Captain America passes the proverbial torch (in the form of his shield) to Sam Wilson, aka Falcon (Anthony Mackie). The Falcon will be accompanied by Bucky Barnes, aka Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan), who will most likely be struggling with his past.  Though originally scheduled to premiere in August 2020, production for the series has been delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. A new release date has not been announced yet. 'WandaVision' - December 2020 Product Embed: Product Name: Disney+ Monthly Subscription Service Card Type: small https://produktor.businessinsider.com/productCardService?id=5dc5bb627eece5443d2df8b9&type=small&live=true Width: 100% Height: 150% "WandaVision" features Wanda Maximoff aka Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen) and Vision (Paul Bettany) post "Avengers: Endgame." Characters like Jimmy Woo from "Ant-Man and the Wasp" (Randall Park) and Darcy Lewis (Kat Dennings) from "Thor: The Dark World" are also in the show, though the actual plot is still light on details. 'Loki' - Spring 2021 Spoiler alert: Loki and all his mischief is coming back. This is excellent news for those who have been mourning Loki's death in "Avengers: Endgame." Tom Hiddleston returns as the Nordic trickster, most likely due to the tesseract that enables him to travel through space and time.  'What If?' - Summer 2021 "What If?" is an animated series based in the Marvel Universe with the premise that changing one small thing in the narrative of the superheroes could change the course of the character and the world. Major talent from Marvel include Chadwick Boseman (Black Panther), Josh Brolin (Thanos), Chris Hemsworth (Thor), Mark Ruffalo (the Hulk), Samuel L. Jackson (Nick Fury), and many more.  'Hawkeye' - Fall 2021 Product Embed: Product Name: Disney+ Monthly Subscription Service Card Type: small https://produktor.businessinsider.com/productCardService?id=5dc5bb627eece5443d2df8b9&type=small&live=true Width: 100% Height: 150% In late 2021, Hawkeye — a superhero without a superpower — will return to the screen in his own spin-off show. In "Hawkeye," Clint Barton (Jeremy Renner) will mentor and bestow his knowledge upon young Avenger Kate Bishop. The character has yet to be officially cast but is rumored to be Hailee Steinfeld.   'Ms. Marvel' - To be announced "Ms. Marvel" will be a groundbreaking live-action show based on the comic by the same name.  The show will feature Kamala Khan, Marvel's first Muslim superhero to star in her own solo comic series, as a Pakistani-American living with her devout family in New Jersey while dealing with her superpowers. 'She-Hulk' - To be announced Marvel has yet to give much information about "She-Hulk," but we do know some details.  The show will focus on Jennifer Walters, cousin of the Hulk, aka Bruce Banner. After Walters gets a blood transfusion from Banner, she gets some of the Hulk's gamma poisoning and becomes the She-Hulk.  'Moon Knight' - To be announced Another project that is light on details is the upcoming adventure series "Moon Knight." All we know is that it's based on a cloaked avenger named Mark Specter, who suffers from multiple personalities and questionable instincts.  'Marvel's 616' – To be announced Product Embed: Product Name: Disney+ Monthly Subscription Service Card Type: small https://produktor.businessinsider.com/productCardService?id=5dc5bb627eece5443d2df8b9&type=small&live=true Width: 100% Height: 150% The documentary series "Marvel's 616" (a working title according to Disney) will do a deep dive into the history and culture behind Marvel's stories and characters.  Read everything else you should know about Disney Plus here: Disney Plus: Everything you need to know about Disney's new ad-free streaming service How to get a free week of Disney Plus, Disney's new ad-free streaming service Disney Plus costs $7 a month on its own, but you can bundle it with Hulu and ESPN+ for an extra $6 All the kids' movies you can stream on Disney Plus — from 'Snow White' to 'Frozen' All the new kids' shows you can watch on Disney Plus — from 'Vampirina' to the new reboot of 'Star Wars: The Clone Wars' All the new shows you can watch on Disney Plus — from 'The Mandalorian' to new Pixar shorts: The Clone Wars' All the Marvel movies and shows you can stream on Disney Plus — from "Iron Man" to the new 'Loki' Every single Star Wars movie is available on Disney Plus in 4K — here's how to watch All the Pixar films and shorts you can stream on Disney Plus — from 'Toy Story' to 'Inside Out'
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(Japan Science and Technology Agency) A group of Japanese scientists has succeeded in the development of modified messenger RNAs (mRNAs) that contain sulfur atoms in the place of oxygen atoms of phosphate moieties of natural mRNAs. They discovered that modified mRNAs accelerated the initiation step of the translation reactions and improved efficiency of protein synthesis by at least 20 times compared with that using natural-form mRNAs.
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If you're looking for a way to watch tournaments, you have a few options available. Here they are.
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The search giant also promises $10 million in job training grants.
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Automation Anywhere was forced to do layoffs in April due to the coronavirus crisis. But Chief Technology Officer Prince Kohli said the startup is looking to fill jobs in response to a spike in demand for the company's brand of cloud-based automation, sparked by the shift to remote work. The roles, with salaries ranging from $100,000 to $200,000 a year, are mostly focused on AI and machine learning, the cloud, and user experience, which refers to design websites that are easy to use and navigate, Kohli tod Business Insider. "Across the board, compensation for all these jobs are over $100,000," he told Business Insider. "We're hiring a lot of AI people and data scientists." Click here for more BI Prime stories. The coronavirus crisis was bad news for Automation Anywhere, forcing it to cut jobs as the pandemic was escalating two months ago. Now the $6.8 billion startup is on a hiring push after the pandemic led to a growing need for automation technology. And the jobs in question pay very well. The roles, with salaries ranging from $100,000 to more than $200,000 a year, are mostly focused on AI and machine learning, the cloud, and user experience, which refers to design websites that are easy to use and navigate, said Prince Kohli, Automation Anywhere's chief technology officer. "Across the board, compensation for all these jobs are over $100,000," he told Business Insider. "We're hiring a lot of AI people and data scientists. We're hiring for cloud skills as well." Automation Anywhere has been a market leader in a new, but fast-growing tech sector called robotic process automation, or RPA, which refers to technology that automates common and repetitive computer tasks. The rapid growth of RPA was underscored on Monday when Automation Anywhere's rival, UiPath, announced that it has raised another $225 million in venture capital funding, boosting its valuation to $10.2 billion. Just eight months ago, Automation Anywhere  raised $290 million from investors led by Salesforce Ventures, boosting its valuation to $6.8 billion. But in April, the Silicon Valley startup announced that it was cutting jobs after the coronavirus crisis led to the sudden shift to remote work, which hurt demand for its core products. Automation Anywhere offers cloud-based software that clients can access remotely. But many of its customers have its software installed on their own servers in their own offices. The lockdown disrupted that business.  But the sudden pivot to remote work also triggered stronger demand for cloud-based automation. Automation Anywhere is pushing to meet that demand with new hires. But unlike last year, the company is focused on a narrower set of positions, Nancy Hauge, the company's chief human resources officer, said. "Last year, we were in blitzscale mode," she told Business Insider. "We were after a critical mass in many areas. This year, we're more focused." A key focus is bringing in more people with "cloud skills," Kohli said. He cited the need for cloud architects, who have become more in-demand since the crisis began. A first-time architect can earn around $200,000 a year, though some one with more experience in that role can make $50,000 to $60,000 more, Kohli said.  Kohli said Automation Anywhere is looking for tech professionals with expertise in AI, which has become increasingly important in automation. He said Automation Anywhere is looking to hire more data scientists and machine learning architects. Making their platform more accessible and easier to use is key which is why it is also important for them to bring in so-called "user experience" designers, he said. All that talent will help give Automation Anywhere an edge in an increasingly-competitive sector: Microsoft and IBM recently made acquisitions to expand their RPA offerings — even as UiPath prepares itself for a potential IPO, as it sees its own boom in business thanks to remote work. "We have continued to see positive momentum so we are in pretty good shape," UiPath CEO Daniel Dines told Business Insider in a recent interview. "I can say that it might accelerate our plan for an IPO early next year." Got a tip about Automation Anywhere or another tech company? Contact this reporter via email at [email protected], message him on Twitter @benpimentel or send him a secure message through Signal at (510) 731-8429. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop. Claim your 20% discount on an annual subscription to BI Prime by clicking here. SEE ALSO: The 10 hottest startups attracting 'hidden investors' who are buying vested stock options from employees during the COVID-19 crisis SEE ALSO: 16 top tech leaders who came to the US from around the world explain their forceful opposition to Trump's freeze on immigrant work visas: 'It's only going to make America less competitive' SEE ALSO: A top Robert Half exec says tech job hunters need to avoid these big 5 blunders during the coronavirus crisis: 'Never shut down your search' SEE ALSO: Hot AI startup UiPath just raised $225 million, lifting its valuation to $10.2 billion, as its CEO eyes an IPO in early 2021 Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: We tested a machine that brews beer at the push of a button
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Tap-tap-tapping on lander's scoop Engineers have hit pause on attempts make the Mars InSight lander's self-hammering mole dig into the red planet as boffins admit "the task is not likely to become easier."…
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WAIC activities held on this day were focusing on enhancing global communication by gathering international organizations, government departments, AI enterprises, and innovation projects from all over the world to exchange progress on AI development.
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Computers and technology are something that we take for granted nowadays. They are so integrated in our daily lives that the fear of solar flares causing our satellites and computers systems to go down is actually a real worry for a lot of people. Young people of today probably can’t conceive or a time when […] The post ‘Leo’ the worlds first computer over 60 now appeared first on Tech Reviews Weekly [Europe].
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If you’re looking to dip your foot into the wonderful world of streaming and your television isn’t equipped with smart software, or the service you want to access isn’t supported out of the box, you’re going to need to invest in a streaming device.This could be an Amazon Fire TV, Apple TV 4K, Google Chromecast, or even a Roku Express or Roku Ultra.That’s right — if you wait until the end of the month, you won’t have to fork out full price to place the magical box or thumb-sized stick that’ll open the door to an endless stream (pun totally intended) of entertainment at the center of your living room.You won’t have to rummage through the depths of the internet to find the cheapest prices, either.Today’s best Black Friday streaming device dealsAmazon Fire TV Stick — $20 ($20 off)
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It is less than a week until Black Friday, but don't tell Amazon: The online retailer got the party started early.The store's Happy HoliDeals page (which might as well be called the Amazon Black Friday page) is already populated with a slew of early deals, but today a bunch of notable Amazon devices joined the sale -- with more to come over the weekend and next week.Let's start with that stuff, and then we'll jump into non-Amazon products (yes, such things exist!)(And don't shop at Amazon without checking out this pro tip: I recently discovered a few Amazon-specific cash-back tricks you may not know about.So check out my advice on how to save an extra 10% to 20% at Amazon.)Echo Show, Amazon Fire tablet and Kindle e-reader deals available right now
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