Walter Winkel

Walter Winkel

Followers 32
Following 34
US
A San Jose-based semiconductor startup being sued by Huawei for stealing trade secrets has hit back in court documents, accusing the Chinese firm’s deputy chairman of conspiring to steal its intellectual property, reports the Wall Street Journal.In court filings, CNEX Labs, which is backed by the investment arms of Dell and Microsoft, alleges that Eric Xu, who is also one of Huawei’s rotating CEOs, worked with other Huawei employees to steal its proprietary technology.The lawsuit, set for trial on June 3 in federal court in the Eastern District of Texas, started in 2017 when Huawei sued CNEX and one of its founders, Yiren “Ronnie” Huang, a former employee at Huawei’s Santa Clara office, for stealing its technology and using unlawful means to poach 14 other Huawei employees.Huawei has denied the startup’s allegations in court filings.Last week, the Chinese telecom equipment maker (and the world’s second-largest smartphone brand), was placed on a trade blacklist by the Trump administration, which also signed an executive order that would make it possible to block American companies from doing business with Huawei and other companies it deems a national security threat.As a result, several companies have suspended business with Huawei, including Google, Qualcomm, Intel and ARM.
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Over the last decade, Colorado State University researchers have led pioneering studies into improving the performance and cost of solar energy by fabricating and testing new materials that extend beyond the capabilities of silicon.In collaboration with partners at Loughborough University in the United Kingdom, researchers at CSU's National Science Foundation-supported Next Generation Photovoltaics Center have reported a key breakthrough in how the performance of cadmium telluride thin-film solar cells is improved even further by the addition of another material, selenium.Their results were published in the journal Nature Energy earlier this month and are the subject of a "News and Views" article."Our paper goes right to the fundamental understanding of what happens when we alloy selenium to cadmium telluride," said Kurt Barth, a director of the Next Generation Photovoltaics Center and an associate research professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.Until now, it was not well understood why the addition of selenium has clocked record-breaking cadmium telluride solar cell efficiency - the ratio of energy output to light input - of just over 22 percent.Their experiments revealed that selenium overcomes the effects of atomic-scale defects in cadmium telluride crystals, providing a new path for more widespread, less expensive solar-generated electricity.
US
Here’s your daily tech digest, by way of the DGiT Daily newsletter, for Wednesday, May 22, 2019!Breaking: Huawei loses its ARM hardwareThe BBC reports that ARM, a vital UK-based chip designer supplying hardware designs, “must suspend business with Huawei,” which is an unexpected and massive problem for the Chinese company now facing complete disruption to its production line.BBC: “UK-based chip designer ARM has told staff it must suspend business with Huawei, according to internal documents obtained by the BBC.”“a source at ARM said staff had not been told they could start working again with Huawei or its subsidiaries, even temporarily.”“ARM is the foundation of Huawei’s smartphone chip designs, so this is an insurmountable obstacle for Huawei,” Geoff Blaber, from CCS Insight, told the BBC.
US
Unsurprisingly, more than two-thirds of the U.S. population has a profile on at least one social networking site.You might have even found yourself on this page via a tweet.From politicians to businesses, social media marketing is fast becoming the best way to reach people.More people will see a viral Facebook post than a television advert, and the social post is usually way cheaper to produce.The balance is still shifting too, so experts in social media marketing are in increasingly high demand.Today’s deal is an extremely cheap way to become a pro in this field, and it’s also a huge price drop on the value of the training.
UK
“It is absolutely gillnets,” said Cynthia Smith, Executive Director for America's National Marine Mammal Foundation (NMMF).Gillnets are coarse nylon fishing nets popular in artisanal fisheries and used across the Gulf of California.On top of that, illegal fishing of the critically endangered totoaba fish has taken place since the late 1980s.The totoaba’s fish bladder, or “maw,” is in high demand in China and in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) markets around the world, where it can fetch more money than gold or cocaine.Like many species around the world, the porpoise was getting caught in the crosshairs of wildlife crime.Andrea Crosta is a crime intelligence expert and the Executive Director of the Elephant Action League (EAL), an organisation with a mission of protecting wildlife and the environment through intelligence and investigative operations.
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Spring and summer are prime backpacking season, and there are few things more unpleasant on a long hike than being stuck on the trail with a crummy backpack.Your knees, hips, and back will appreciate a quality ruck (especially after you’re several miles into your trek while under load), so it’s worth it to invest in a good way to carry your stuff comfortably.The main compartments contain a lined sleeve for laptops and tablets so you don’t have to leave your tech behind when camping, and the laptop sleeve can also fit a water reservoir.The Refugio also has several outer pockets for your smaller kit as well as side stash pockets for things like water bottles and other quick-access items.The back panel and shoulder pads are meshed for breathability, and the removable sternum strap adds some extra stability when you need it.This versatile and water-repellent pack, available in seven different colors, rings in at just $89 right now from REI.
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UK
Fancy a big discount on a Now TV pass for Sky Sports?Well you're in luck as you can knock 26% off the monthly price of Sky Sports for four months, with the option of cancelling anytime you wish.This is perfectly timed for you to enjoy the upcoming ICC Cricket World Cup, The Ashes, UEFA Nations League and even the start of the next Premier League.Better yet, you can stream all of this from your smart TV, console, laptop or phone.Sky Sports on Now TV usually costs £33 a month, but this deal knocks that down to just £25.You can pay this low price for four months, saving you a total of £32 compared to the usual price you'd pay for that long.
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Sweden
As reported today, however, president Donald Trump american companies from using telecom equipment built by companies that represent a national security risk.the united states suspects that telecom equipment from Huawei can be used by the chinese state to spy, something that Huawei has consistently denied.How countries within the EU should deal with these issues are still under investigation, and in Sweden the government has given the national Post and telecom agency commissioned to do a risk analysis for cyber-security in the Swedish 5g networks.president of the French republic Emmanuel Macron said today, however, that France does not have the intention to ”block Huawei or any other company”, reports the Reuters news agency.”Our perspective is not to block Huawei or any other company, it is to maintain our national security and european independence.But to start a technology war or a trade war... I don't think it is appropriate,” said Macron as he spoke during the conference VivaTech in Paris, reports Reuters.
US
Despite the excitement currently surrounding blockchain, it seems supply chain managers are falling out of love with the decentralized technology.Procurement industry leaders discussed blockchain at the Supply Management Forum in London last week and spoke of how they are still waiting for the value of blockchain adoption to be proven.Organizations aren’t investing in blockchain technology yet because “It lacks practical application,” Supply Management Magazine (SMM) reports.Jaguar Land Rover’s global purchasing transformation director, Richard Harding, even said that he has not yet seen a blockchain use case enticing enough to make him invest his time into it.Some might find that surprising, given headlines at the end of April were awash with the news that Jaguar Land Rover was working with IOTA to reward drivers with cryptocurrency.A spokesperson recently told Hard Fork in an email that JLR’s relationship with IOTA is currently a “research project.” Whether it will be deployed or not remains to be seen.
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UK
Astronauts and Jeff Bezos-types hoping to set up shop on the Moon might have another challenge to worry about: moonquakes caused by tectonic activity.Apollo mission seismometers measured 28 shallow moonquakes between 1969 and 1977 that seemed to lack origin.Researchers re-calculated the epicentres of these quakes and found that eight of them occurred near small cliffs produced along fault lines.Combined with evidence of dust and boulders moving near these faults, the researchers conclude that the Moon is tectonically active.“We’ve got these possibly active faults on the Moon, which means it isn’t this dead body,” Tom Watters, study first author from the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, told Gizmodo.“It flies in the face of conventional wisdom, that the smaller a rocky body, the quicker it loses interior heat and becomes geologically inactive.”
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UK
Semiconductor and telecommunications equipment manufacturer Qualcomm said on Wednesday it will take home a one-time payment of between $4.5 billion to $4.7 billion (£3.45bn to £3.6bn) from its settlement with tech giant Apple over the next quarter, the New York Times reported.Last month, Qualcomm and Apple put to bed a massive, long-running patent and antitrust case that started when Apple sued the other company for alleged unfair patent licensing practices for $1 billion (£765m) and escalated when Qualcomm filed a countersuit for $7 billion (£5.4bn).Qualcomm came out the apparent victor, scoring a six-year licensing deal and a chip supply agreement as well as the massive one-off payment (though it also ended up shut out of supplying chips for a line of iPhones).That multibillion dollar payment is a big deal for Qualcomm: the company estimated in its quarterly earnings report that it expects to take in a total of $4.7 billion to $5.5 billion (£3.6bn to £4.2bn) in regular revenue, before the payment is factored in, during the upcoming quarter.However, the company also said its legal war chest isn’t necessarily an immediate game changer, even if the deal positions it to be Apple’s sole 5G modem supplier in the wake of Intel’s withdrawal from the market.The Times noted that Qualcomm’s Q3 2019 forecasts, which fell on the slightly lower side of analyst expectations of $5.29 billion, “suggested that Apple’s licensing fees will not substantially increase revenue as Apple catches up on royalties it didn’t pay while the two companies were feuding.”
US
Among the new watches is the Forerunner 245, an upgrade to the popular Forerunner 235.It is similar in size and appearance to the Forerunner 645 but has a black bezel instead of stainless steel.The Forerunner 245 still has a sunlight-readable color display and five buttons for navigating the menu system.Internally, Garmin is using a new heart-rate monitor for the Forerunner 245 and a pulse oximeter to measure oxygen absorption.To accompany the new GPS, there now are full-color maps that let you navigate a course or find your way back to your starting point.Advanced running dynamics ( requires a compatible chest strap, running pod)
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Garmin recently added new colors to its Instinct hiking smartwatch, and now the company is back with some more good news.Today, the company revamped its running-focused Forerunner lineup, introducing five new fitness watches.Garmin also updated its Connect app adding support for women’s menstrual cycles and expanding its Garmin Coach to 10K and half-marathon distances.The Forerunner 45 is the entry-level running model with a heart rate monitor and built-in GPS.It tracks your basic running metrics like pace, distance, and intervals.It also monitors your health and wellness with 24/7 heart rate monitoring and sleep analysis.
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Podcast startup RedCircle is officially launching today with a focus on helping small shows grow.Its first step is releasing a feature that assists podcasters in setting up cross-promotions with other podcasters, agreements in which two shows promote each other.The company’s cross-promotion feature allows RedCircle to automatically insert promotions into shows once both podcasters have agreed.“The short story [of how we got started] is that there’s not a lot of interesting technology that’s being built for the small podcaster,” Mike Kadin, co-founder and CEO, tells The Verge.“We saw a lot of space for the independent podcaster who’s taking their work seriously, but doesn’t have a five-person ad sales team to take care of them.There’s a lot of room for work there and just a massive long tail with podcasts.”
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US
Zipline, the San Francisco-based UAV manufacturer and logistics services provider, has launched a program in Ghana today for drone delivery of medical supplies.Working with the Ghanaian government, Zipline will operate 30 drones out of four distribution centers to distribute vaccines, blood, and life-saving medications to 2000 health facilities across the West African nation daily.“That’s why Ghana is launching the world’s largest drone delivery service…a major step towards giving everyone in this country universal access to lifesaving medicine.”The Ghana program adds a second country to Zipline’s live operations.Zipline got off the ground in Rwanda and has leveraged its experience in East Africa to begin testing medical delivery services in the United States.Zipline has been making moves in Africa since at least 2016 — after it raised capital and solidified its mission to carve out a global revenue-generating business around UAV delivery of critical medical supplies.
US
On Tuesday, you can buy the Motorola Moto G7 Play for $50 at Boost Mobile stores.The normally $200 phone is part of the Moto G family which includes the Moto G7 that earned a CNET Editor's Choice award.To take advantage of the deal, you have to go to a Boost Mobile store and switch to an unlimited data plan that's $50 or more.This is a developing story.
US
A New York teenager is suing Apple for $1 billion, claiming the company's alleged use of facial recognition in its stores led to his wrongful arrest.18-year-old Ousmane Bah said he was arrested at his home in November and charged with stealing from an Apple Store in Boston.Bah said he was attending his senior prom in Manhattan on the day of the alleged thefts, and that he was wrongly implicated in other Apple Store thefts.Bah's suit says the teenager had lost a driver's permit with his photo, and this may have been connected to his misidentification.Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.An 18-year-old is suing Apple for $1 billion following a "traumatic" wrongful arrest, which he claims was a result of misidentification by Apple's facial recognition software.
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Cheap Styrofoam coolers get the job done if you just want to keep a couple of drinks cold, but they typically end up in landfills, where they can take hundreds of years to break down, if not longer.Now, Igloo has an alternative that won't fill you with green guilt during your next trip to the beach.It's called the Igloo Recool, and Igloo calls it "the world's first eco-sensitive cooler made from 100% biodegradable materials."At just $10 each, it goes on sale exclusively at REI stores starting May 1, with a wider retail rollout set for later this summer.First seen in January at the Outdoor Retailer and Snow Show, the Recool is a hard-sided cooler made from a mix of paraffin wax and recycled tree pulp.With a capacity of 24 quarts, it promises to retain ice for up to 12 hours, making it a good pick for quick day trips.
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The Eclipse Foundation has proposed the creation of an open-source project called Eclipse Tempest to build tools for developing, testing, and debugging applications for the Kubernetes container orchestration platform.The tools would also help developers migrate existing applications to Docker and Kubernetes.With Tempest, Eclipse wants to provide tools for building Kubernetes applications without regard to IDE or programming language.The initial code contribution is to include plug-ins for the Eclipse Java IDE, the Eclipse Che cloud IDE, and Microsoft’s Visual Studio Code editor.Capabilities of the Tempest toolkit are to include the following:Rapid development of an application from a template or sample.
UK
EURid, registry manager of the .eu top-level domain, has reported a plunge of just over 130,000 registrations for 2018."Compared to 2017, the total net registrations decreased by 130,305 (from 3,815,055 to 3,684,750)," the firm said in its annual report (PDF), bucking a trend of 2.2 per cent year-on-year growth over the past decade.Two main reasons were given for the reduction: firstly, a fall in registrations from the UK, down from fourth to sixth place; secondly, the suspension of more than 35,000 domains linked to identity fraud.Though the UK still accounted for 240,887 new .eu registrations, by a massive margin most came from Germany with 983,640.In second place was the Netherlands with 474,697.EURid claimed a renewal rate of 78.75 per cent.
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