Yesterday London experienced its largest terrorist incident since the 2005.In 2005, radios did not work on the Tube network, which hindered the ability to coordinate the rescue of the people trapped underground.These devices don’t use the normal mobile network, but a special “trunked” network designed for emergency services, and is arguably more analogous to old-fashioned walkie-talkies than mobile phones.New gadgets exist, like the “Throwbot”, which is essentially a camera on wheels and is designed for reconnaissance in tight spaces.Since 7/7, real time CCTV has been introduced on London buses, using the 3G and 4G networks to send the signals back to base.Similarly, in the last few years the government has approved explosive trace detection systems for use in airports.
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Yesterday London experienced its largest terrorist incident since the 2005.In 2005, radios did not work on the Tube network, which hindered the ability to coordinate the rescue of the people trapped underground.These devices don’t use the normal mobile network, but a special “trunked” network designed for emergency services, and is arguably more analogous to old-fashioned walkie-talkies than mobile phones.New gadgets exist, like the “Throwbot”, which is essentially a camera on wheels and is designed for reconnaissance in tight spaces.Since 7/7, real time CCTV has been introduced on London buses, using the 3G and 4G networks to send the signals back to base.Similarly, in the last few years the government has approved explosive trace detection systems for use in airports.
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The World Meteorological Organisation's International Cloud Atlas has added twelve new types to its list of recognised clouds, including one lobbied for by cloud appreciators (yes, really).The physical version of the Atlas has existed since the 1800s, but has just gone digital with its first update since the 80s and is now accessible to the public as well as meteorologists.The new version has some exciting additions:Several new, formal cloud classifications have been introduced.These include one new species (volutus), five new supplementary features (asperitas, cauda, cavum, fluctus and murus), and one new accessory cloud (flumen).The species floccus has been formally recognised as being able to occur in association with stratocumulus.
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But when you search Google for “Great Barrier Reef,” that’s not all that you’ll find.Instead, at the very top of the page in the Top Stories module, you’ll see a Breitbart article dismissing the damage done to the famed coral reef that sounds like it was written by a student who hasn’t slept in 72 hours.We were first alerted to the placement of the story—written by notorious climate change denier James Delingpole—by Twitter user Cody Brown.I’ll lay money that if you asked this question to your kids’ biology teacher or to Bill Nye the Junk Science Guy or to that nice Richard Osman off Pointless or to Matt Damon or anyone else who would have voted for Hillary Clinton or to any Labour (and a good many Conservative) politicians or anyone who works for the ABC in Australia, the BBC, the Guardian, MSNBC, CNN and the New York Times or comedy Senator Al Franken or Myles Allen, Professor of Geosystem science at Oxford University or pretty much any other science prof from Oxford, Cambridge, Harvard or Yale or any marine biologist or a lawyer from a big City law firm or anyone who voted Remain in the EU Referendum, you’d get the same answer: “Yes.”Listen, this guy says he’s been to the Great Barrier Reef himself, folks, and did he see any of this phony liberal globalist scheme known as “climate change?” Nope!Take it from the coral reef experts surveying it, as Gizmodo covered last year:
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A routine check performed by NASA has uncovered two tears on the treads of the Mars Curiosity Rover’s left middle wheel.Scientists with the Curiosity mission noticed the small breaks, both of which are on the rover’s raised treads, on March 19th.NASA last took a look at the wheels on January 27th and noticed nothing out of the ordinary, so the damage occurred only recently.NASA obviously isn’t happy about it, but insists the wear-and-tear will not change its current science plans or diminish the rover’s opportunities to study key features on Mars.“All six wheels have more than enough working lifespan remaining to get the vehicle to all destinations planned for the mission,” said Curiosity Project Manager Jim Erickson, in an agency release.Mission planners got a hint that Curiosity’s wheels were deteriorating faster than expected back in 2013, so they began to drive the rover in reverse as a protective measure.
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Scientists have found a thing that does us good by consuming it and the news that will shock you?It's only bloody old beer.They say, in a salted nutshell, that one pint a day reduces the risk of developing several serious heart conditions.The study was assembled by a joint team from the University of Cambridge and University College London, who aggregated the health records of around two million adults.Their data suggested that moderate drinkers who have no more than one tipple a day were less likely to see a doctor for heart worries, beating even teetotallers when it comes to heart wellbeing and recording fewer incidents of heart attack and blood clots.The full study published in the BMJ found that people who drink no alcohol were more likely to experience some forms of angina, aneurysm and arterial disease, although the benefits of a drink disappear as soon as those whose records were analysed strayed over the maximum official alcohol consumption guidelines.
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The internet has made it supremely easy to install connected security cameras wherever you want.Unfortunately for Nest, that easy connectivity makes it simple for hackers to disable its cameras with just a few keystrokes.Nest’s indoor and outdoor security camera as well as Dropcams and Dropcam Pros have serious-sounding vulnerabilities that let hackers disconnect the cameras with a Bluetooth command.Security researcher Jason Doyle discovered the flaws and reported them to Nest, but the Alphabet subsidiary has failed to release a patch.After Doyle published the details of the vulnerabilities, however, the company said that it’s aware of the issues and working on a fix.There are actually three vulnerabilities, all of which involve the most recent firmware, version 5.2.1, which was released in January 2016.
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A company promising the eco dream of electric flight says it might have a model ready, oh, within about ten years or so, with budget flier Easyjet helping steer the development on the commercial side of things.They've thought up a good name for the company at least -- Wright Electric.They say that within a decade they might be able to come up with an e-plane that's able to shuffle 150 people distances of up to 300 miles, presumably followed by a week-long turnaround for the thing to recharge.Wright Electric thinks that removing the need to pay for fuel might make flying even cheaper than it is now (as long as you only bring a rucksack), although enough electricity to haul 150 people and an aeroplane is going to need quite the expensive battery.The company has been assembled from a team that had prior development funding from NASA, which sounds great until you read the plan.It's all relying on battery technology getting significantly better, with the plane perhaps being bumped down to hybrid status if there's not a huge leap in power cell technology in the coming years.
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Virgin Media has just embarrassed all the other broadband providers by making ultrafast 100Mbps fibre its standard package, and increasing available speeds to 300Mbps.A slightly sassy quote from CEO Tom Mockridge points out that Virgin's packages begin where most providers top out (the highest widely-available Openreach speed is 76Mbps):"By beefing up our bundles we’re leaving our competitors in the rear view mirror, starting where they finish.Eye-watering speeds, a better box and top-notch TV is a winning combination.More and more switchers tell us they are joining Virgin Media for our faster speeds and we understand why - whether it’s 4K Netflix, box sets in multiple rooms or online gaming, the best entertainment requires the best broadband and we’re making sure our customers are covered with these bundles at incredible value.”If you get Virgin Fibre VIVID (VM's name for the top speed packages) on its own, your monthly cost on a 12-month contract including line rental starts at £32.25 for 100 meg and goes up to £47.25 for 300 meg.
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There are some New York restaurants that you can mention in any social setting and someone will invariably nod and intone, sagely, “Oh, yes, I go there all the time.” Somewhat remarkably for a vegan Ethiopian spot—in Bushwick, no less—Bunna Café is one of them.It’s one of those vegan restaurants where the absence of meat and dairy isn’t obvious while you’re there, but when you venture out the door your step has a new spring in it.The dining room at Bunna is dark, woody, filament-bulb-lit, and perennially almost full.Murmuring couples on dates provide backing vocals for out-of-towners visiting friends for the first time (“Brooklyn’s basically a big city, right?”), until a steel-drum band, say, strikes up a set, mixing Beatles covers with island rhythms.There may even be a coffee ceremony going on, with incense burning as demitasse cups are filled with pungent black liquid.At Bunna, which means “coffee” in Amharic, the ceremonial coffee is free.
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More Charts   Even as the smartphone has exploded in popularity, the television has remained the most viewed screen in most Americans’ lives.As this chart from Statista shows, though, its grip is starting to loosen.According to the most recent Total Audience Report from research firm Nielsen, young Americans between the ages of 18 and 24 now spend more time using smartphones than watching TV, with about a five-hour gap between the two.Older generations still prefer TV by a good margin, but the younger you go, the closer the gap gets.This doesn't necessarily mean traditional TV is dying, but it probably won't be dominant, and this only furthers the notion that when and where people consume media is diversifying.It’s no wonder so many companies are trying to get ahead of the streaming TV game.NOW WATCH: This animation shows how terrifyingly powerful nuclear weapons have becomeLoading video...
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Every year, supplements send roughly 20,000 people to the emergency room.Last year, the world's largest dietary supplement maker, GNC Holdings Inc, agreed to pay $2.25 million to avoid federal prosecution over its alleged sale of illegal pills and powders.And the Food and Drug Administration has ordered the makers of several supplements to recall their products after scientists found traces of illegal and potentially dangerous molecules in their formulas.Still, while many supplements are useless, there are others that we can't enough of simply by eating a healthy diet.So here are the supplements you should take — and the ones to avoid.
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We’ve all heard the “walk 10,000 steps a day to be healthy” pitch, but new research says that, while 10,000 is better than nothing, it might not quite be enough.The study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, looked at postal workers in Glasgow, Scotland, including office workers and carriers who primarily deliver mail by foot.Each participant wore an activity tracker and had their body mass index, waist size, blood sugar level, and cholesterol profile measured throughout the study.All of which, of course, are risk factors for heart disease.Unsurprisingly, those who sat most of the day had higher BMIs, larger waistlines, poor blood sugar control, and less than ideal cholesterol profiles when compared to those who moved around more.In fact, for every hour of sitting during the day beyond five hours, participants had a .2% increased likelihood of developing heart disease in their lifetime based on the researchers’ model.
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It was a productive meeting at the FCC: Chairman Pai talked about putting pressure on phone scammers, preventing phone smuggling in prisons, and improving mobile service.First, the Commission announced that it would be considering a proposed rule and inquiry into using technical means to prevent robocalls.Certain methods of spoofing phone numbers make it so they only connect one way, which makes spamming people a risk-free proposition.That’s great, of course, but if you don’t like unsolicited advertising, you probably also don’t like the prospect of ISPs building a profile of your household or even members of it by monitoring your search history.Next up was the growing problem of contraband phones at jails and prisons.ISPs would be aware that you have a friend or family member in jail, of course, if you created an account at one of the services that provides phone cards and connectivity to correctional facilities.
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The internet has made it supremely easy to install connected security cameras wherever you want.Unfortunately for Nest, that easy connectivity makes it simple for hackers to disable its cameras with just a few keystrokes.Nest’s indoor and outdoor security camera as well as Dropcams and Dropcam Pros have serious-sounding vulnerabilities that let hackers disconnect the cameras with a Bluetooth command.Security researcher Jason Doyle discovered the flaws and reported them to Nest, but the Alphabet subsidiary has failed to release a patch.After Doyle published the details of the vulnerabilities, however, the company said that it’s aware of the issues and working on a fix.There are actually three vulnerabilities, all of which involve the most recent firmware, version 5.2.1, which was released in January 2016.
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Nintendo has denied a design flaw in the Joy-Con controllers for its latest Switch console, while admitting that 'a manufacturing variation' has resulted in some units suffering from frequent disconnections.Designed to be used hand-held, docked into a grip, or attached to the side of the portable Switch console itself, Nintendo's Joy-Con controllers use a wireless connection to transmit their signals.Sadly, many early adopters have been complaining of issues with the wireless connectivity resulting in extremely short ranges - and, in some cases, the left Joy-Con controller disconnecting itself even when physically attached to the console.'There is no design issue with the Joy-Con controllers, and no widespread proactive repair or replacement effort is underway,' Nintendo has claimed in a statement to press on the matter.'A manufacturing variation has resulted in wireless interference with a small number of the left Joy-Con.Moving forward this will not be an issue, as the manufacturing variation has been addressed and corrected at the factory level.
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EK Water Blocks has announced what it describes as a 'revolutionary' new terminal for its full-cover graphics card water blocks, featuring G1/4" connectors which can spin in a full circle - hence the pun.Designed for use with the company's existing range of full-coverage graphics card water blocks, EKWB's EK-FC Terminal Rotary 90 Black does what its name suggests: offers a pair of G1/4" connectors for coolant input and extraction which come out at a 90 degree angle to the graphics card while also rotation through a full 360 degrees - making it simpler, the theory goes, to neatly run fixed or flexible piping around your case.The terminal is designed as a drop-in replacement for the stock version supplied with almost all EKWB's full-coverage GPU water blocks bar the original CSQ design models.The terminal block itself is finished in forged brass coated in non-stick polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and finished in black - though the company's calling out of the colour finish in the product name suggests other finishes may follow in the future if the black version proves a success.Sadly, the ability to run your piping into the card from any angle comes at a considerable cost: EKWB has set a retail price of €24.95 (around £22).With existing rotating G1/4" adaptors costing less than £5 a piece, and two being required to complete the modification, the pricing of EKWB's terminal will likely appeal only to those who want an easy drop-in solution for an existing EKWB-brand water block.
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Shops patronized by pot smokers have a long tradition of labeling their pipes and vaporizers “for tobacco use only.” But startups developing smoking and vaping gear are basically asking customers to put their weed in it.Not a single company that mentioned tobacco, cigarettes or e-cigarettes in its Crunchbase profile raised a disclosed funding round in the past year.Now, it’s true e-cigarettes were never exactly a smoking hot sector for funding.NJOY, an e-cigarette brand launched in 2006, for instance, raised a total of $165 million in private equity funding and closed its last round in 2014 with a reported $1 billion valuation.The space has produced some sizeable exits as well, such as Altria’s purchase of e-cigarette maker Green Smoke in 2014 for up to $130 million.One of them, Electronic Cigarettes International Group, for example, raised nearly $60 million in private financings in 2015.
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cer has made a lot of ultrabooks, but the only one worth mentioning is the current S 13.Acer is taking the perks of owning a pricier machine and making them more accessible, creating an ultrabook that’s a good value without a ton of compromises.Intel Core i7-6500U, dual-core 2.50GHz (turbo 3.1GHz)13.3″ full HD (1080p) IPS matte touchscreenIntel HD Graphics 520 with shared memoryDimensions: 12.87 ” (w), 8.98″ (d), 0.57″ (h)
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Google, Uber, Ford, BMW, ARM – the list goes on and on for big tech and auto companies looking to develop driverless cars.The race to bring driverless cars to market is definitely in full swing, with the self-driving future seemingly driving into every industry segment.Driverless cars will only succeed if there is consumer appetite – appetite which is currently at odds to the huge R investment big tech and auto companies are funneling into driverless.Although interest in owning driverless cars remains low, those championing the future tech can look to the increase in appetitie as somewhat of a silver lining – Britian is the only European country in the survey where interest for fully autonomous vehicles has increased.Interest is also higher among British consumers for advanced automation technology in vehicles, such as adaptive cruise control or lane centering technology.However, in another blow to the driverless industry, consumers increasingly expect such technology as standard and are less willing to pay an excess for its inclusion.
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