Even as the country prepares to ban liquor sales near major highways to curb drunk driving this year, consumption of alcohol in India has expanded at an average of 8.9% annually in the past six years, reaching an estimated (1.46 trillion rupees) last year.A global study by Paris-based Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has found that alcohol consumption in India has risen by over a period of 20 years, from 1992 to 2012.With the minimum drinking age varying from 18 to 25 across states, India had approximately 485 million people of legal drinking age in 2013.“The underlying consumption potential in India isn’t strong, it’s extremely strong,” Pernod Ricard Chief Executive Officer told reporters in London in February this year.The world’s second-largest distiller sells Royal Stag and Imperial Blue whiskeys in India.Not to be left behind by the larger counterparts and established names, in order to target young consumers of drinks, varied startups have emerged to target this ripe market.
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But car companies like to use the track as a marketing vehicle, and because of the gullibility of sponsors willing to splurge cash to show involvement in the business, it probably costs them very little money.Away from the track, Citi Research analyst Michael Tyndall reckons Ferrari is about to start a new growth phase, which could blast past the old notional ceiling of 10,000 a year.In 2016 Ferrari sold 8,014 cars globally, and plans 8,400 this year.Ferrari’s adjusted EBITDA (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation) rose to 251 million euros ($267 million) in the fourth quarter.Morgan Stanley sees a possible rise in volume to nearly 13,500 by 2020, with the addition of a new, “cheaper” model below the 488 which could add between 2,000 and 3,000 to sales a year.“We continue to like Ferrari for its stable, defensible qualities and are comfortable with the more modest growth opportunities around items such as volume and pricing,” said Morgan Stanley analyst Adam Jonas.
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Instagram CEO and co-founder Kevin Systrom has made it a goal to foster a safer environment for the photo social network app.Instagram will now start placing a screen over sensitive photos and videos, which have been reported by someone in the community.If you want to see posts that have been covered, then you will simply have to tap on it.This is Instagram’s way of making it less likely to have “unwanted experiences in the app.”Instagram also added an extra security layer to protect users against hacks, known as two-factor authentication.Instagram's two-factor authentication will require a code every time a new device logs into your account.
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Last month China issued the world's first ABS deal backed by revenues from a sewage treatment Public-Private Partnership ("PPP")In China, no different from elsewhere, local governments are expected to provide better and greener energy, transport, telecom, water, sanitation, etc.But, unlike other local governments, they are expressly expected to absorb an additional 100 million rural migrant workers from the countryside under a adopted in 2014.Nevertheless, China's State Council , also dated 2014, requires local governments to cut back on investment and delever their balance sheets.Infrastructure finance has always been a challenge.Projects that are good for growth and life quality are good for government; but the long payback times, low returns and ever-present risk of sovereign interference are a hard sell for commercial investors.
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Earlier this month, Genius, which started as a rap annotation platform, decided that now it would become a video-focused company.The expectation is that at least some of these companies will make it to the $100-plus million revenue threshold that’s the arbitrary mark of a “scaled” media company.For men’s lifestyle player Complex Media, reaching $100 million was always a goal, said Rich Antoniello, CEO and founder.Verizon and Hearst teamed up to buy Complex in a deal valued at $250 million to $300 million in April.“Many look at it as a ‘proof point’ that the business can scale further and have significant longevity/viability because of foundational importance to the advertising community,” Antoniello said.The result is that lately there have been fewer outright acquisitions of publishing companies than investments, which are lower-risk and less “all-in.”
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But at BuzzFeed, anybody on staff can query the massive pile of data they’re aggregating from the dozens of platforms and syndication partners they use to distribute content, and nearly half the company’s employees now pull data on a monthly basis.That’s one result of a nearly year-long process of building tools that allow BuzzFeed’s employees to access data without leaning on its data science teams.“I think a lot of organizations have this idea of data teams being gatekeepers,” said Lyle Smith, a senior data scientist at BuzzFeed.“This allowed us to democratize that.”At a growing number of publishers, information about how content and ads perform is gathered by a small data science team, which then fields requests from people in different departments looking for insights.Those insights might form the foundation of anything, from the translation of a popular quiz into a video series to the launch of a new kind of branded content, and so requests for this kind of information come from all over the place, from editors to client services managers to product team leaders.
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But for British Vogue, the platform’s Stories feature allows the publisher to be a little more playful.“We’re trying to do fun things, like filming in the fashion cupboard, out in a shoot, a mix of things tied to special occasions,” said Sam Rogers, acting editor at Vogue.co.uk.The fashion brand’s U.K. account has doubled to 2 million followers in the last year, thanks largely to how it has honed its Instagram Stories and video output since December.Tubular Labs data shows the Instagram account had nearly 850,000 video views over the month of February.Of course, fashion weeks across the globe make this a big month in the industry calendar.The previous months saw the account fetch around 400,000 video views.
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For all the talk of nimble agile offices and real-time content, many advertisers are still wedded to drawn-out pitch processes that can last half a year or more.The car marketplace, which has undergone a dramatic digital overhaul, has tested a new approach on its last two agency hunts.“Because we are fast-paced in how we work, spending nine months on a pitch wasn’t really an option,” explained Pierre Dadd, head of brand at AutoTrader.(In the old days, rough ad ideas were sketched on tracing paper, or tissues.)The process was pretty simple: After creating a brief, the Auto Trader team shortlisted six agencies and met each of them at their offices to test the “chemistry.” Following this, all six were invited to the Auto Trader Manchester office for an immersion day: essentially, to feel out the business, its staff and its goals.Then, a winner was chosen.
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Over the course of a month, the brand’s ads appeared on more than 700,000 domains even though the demand-side platform reported the ads had only appeared on 2,500 domains.Although brand ads appearing next to extreme content has always been a quirk of the internet, the current political environment has placed pressure on brands that have had ads appear next to racist content on websites like Breitbart and YouTube.But because of rampant reselling and mislabeling, the blocks don’t eliminate websites from slipping through.Imagine ihatesports.com being presented as espn.com to buyers.Some exchanges will make concessions with shady publishers because every website they turn away is viewed as lost revenue, the analyst said.“Major buying platforms only look as far as their contracts require them to go,” said Adyapper CEO Elliot Hirsch.
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The below is written by Guy Bisson, Research Director, Ampere Analysis, and is part of Found Remote's MIPTV 2017 preview series.Collaboration, tech integration and localised globalisation: The future of content is hereWhat can a camera company tell the content industry about the future of video entertainment?Whether Snap Inc’s $28bn IPO valuation is justified or not, the platform’s positioning and juxtaposition of content and hardware says an awful lot about the future of TV and entertainment formats.Consider this from Snap Inc’s recent IPO filing: “Our latest effort to reinvent the camera is Spectacles, our sunglasses that make Snaps.Spectacles connect seamlessly with Snapchat and are the best way to make Memories because they capture video from a human perspective.”
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I wanted to buy some mini marshmallows recently, so I went on Amazon.Perhaps because of their resemblance to packing material—light, bulky, ubiquitous—I figured they’d be cheap.But when I found the most popular brand, not only did the marshmallows cost twice what I’d pay at my local store, the price had skyrocketed overnight.Just beneath the placid surface of a typical product page on Amazon lies an unseen world, a system where third-party vendors can sell products alongside Amazon’s own goods.
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India, home to a fast growing e-commerce market, is set to see $30bn of the fashion market digitally influenced by 2020, according to a Boston Consulting Group and Facebook report, Fashion Forward 2020.Today $7bn to $9bn of the $70bn Indian fashion market is currently digitally influenced, with the numbers to quadruple by 2020.Mobile is also set to rise, as 85% of online fashion buyers prefer mobile over any other device, mirroring other reports about mobile usage in the country.Fashion e-commerce already accounts for about 4% of the total fashion market, comparable to sales from brick and mortar outlets (3.15%).Online purchases are set to multiply by about four times to hit $12bn to $14bn by 2020, contributing 11-12% of the Indian fashion market.The spurt of new fashion shoppers will bring with it a fundamental shift in the profile of online fashion shoppers.
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But brands need to stop ‘spamming’ consumers with irrelevant messaging and target them contextually within their environment if they want to add value to their customers, agreed panellists at The Drum’s personalisation event, in association with lifecycle engagement platform, Appboy.Speaking at The Drum Arms pub in London last week, the panel, which consisted of speakers from News UK, mobile transformation company Somo, Mediacom Worldwide, Appboy, and events startup Revl, argued that spamming disguised as personalisaiton will only hurt a brand's reputation.“My expectation for what I see on billboards are not super high but when my phone vibrates and I see a message, it better be delivering value to me,” said Bill Magnuson, CEO & co-founder at Appboy.Personalisation is the implicit inference from the data that we collect about people.“Most brands are rightfully trying to add value [through personalisation] but right now are being let down by the data that they have and finding out why the consumer would want to respond to that,” he said.For Sleight, we have only "scratched the surface" on location-based targeting, as most of the personalsation that brands try to provide is "completely out of context".
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Tommy Hilfiger and Hugo Boss have become the latest fashion brands to embrace Android Wear smart watches after established tech companies such as Motorola, which this year has opted to skip a new release, have left a possible gap in the market.Of the two Hugo Boss have plumped for a more formal look with a leather strap and unfussy clockface for the Touch.Omitting some superfluous features such as a heart rate monitor it will nevertheless come with NFC built-in.Those looking to decorate their wrist with the watch can expect to part with $395 when it launches in August.For its part rival Tommy Hilfiger has plumped for a more casual look, opting for a chain link strap while keeping costs down by eliminating both NFC and the heart monitor.In doing so Tommy Hilfiger will undercut its rival with a $299 price point.
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ManmanFounder: Wang LingFounded in: 2015Financing status: RMB 40 million (USD 5.8 million) financing in 2017Manman is a mobile comics platform that produces and issues original comics.Founded in Beijing in 2017, Manman has more than 980 original comics on its app, and 315 comics are exclusive.Manman has more than 14 million users out of which 3 million are active users, and 2 million users have more than 20 subscriptions on it.Manman is now trying to make profits with paid subscriptions, advertising and reward systems.Manman’s pre-Series A financing round was led by Fosun Kinzon Capital, Kaitai Capital and Cherubic Ventures.Its Series A financing round was led by Sigma Square Capital.The funds from these two financing rounds will be used to make new comics and increase Manman’s social media exposure.Media community Nanyouquan lands USD 3 M for pre-Series AScreenshot from Nanyouquan.netNanyouquanFounder: Gou HuaFounded in: 2015Financing status: RMB 20 million (USD 3 million) pre-Series A financing in 2017Nanyouquan is a media community that aims to help media professionals start their own business, and it provide services such as startup incubator, branding and financing services.
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The recent emergence of the fictitious reporter, Jonathan Pie, angrily ranting at his camera man between broadcasts about topical events has engrossed millions of viewers through Facebook and YouTube.Now, as the character reaches the mainstream through three reports made for Comic Relief, The Drum speaks to Pie's creator and performer Tom Walker who dropped by The Drum Arms during Advertising Week Europe, to discuss his creation and his lessons from it.Where did the concept for Jonathan Pie originate?I thought 'why not have a socialist leader for a supposedly socialist party - what an extraordinary idea that would be."I recorded it and put it out there and it had about 1,000 hits in four days.They are part of the problem and that is probably more true of the left of politics than the right, the unwillingness to at least consider someone else's point of view which Pie would argue is how things like Trump and Brexit come about.
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With content online increasingly superfluous to demand, alongside a trend for consumers getting social media fatigue, brands need to be smarter about how they use online platforms, according to AKQA Tokyo group creative director Claudia CristovaoSpeaking at Adfest last week, Cristovao discussed the issue of brands posting content online that’ll never be seen, not least by the people that it’s intended to reach.Her key piece of advice to brands was that human input would get the best outcomes from technology at this stage.There needs to be a human input that tells technology what to do and what to achieve, we’re still at that stage,” she argued.She said AQKA as an agency did get very excited about technology but it was careful not to let it override the “meaning or impact”.Brands who know what they want to say and have a fairly good idea of who they want to talk to will find the technology needed, because the message will make the technology necessary.
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President Trump is set to unveil on Monday a new White House agency called the “Office of American Innovation”, headed by his son-in-law, Jared Kushner; which will hold extensive powers to overhaul federal procedures and potentially privatize certain government responsibilities, by culling ideas from the business community, according to a report in The Washington PostThe new office headed by Kushner will report directly to his father-in-law and will be staffed by members of the business community and advised by the heads of several large technology and manufacturing companies including Apple’s chief executive Tim Cook, Elon Musk from Tesla and SpaceX, Marc Benioff from Salesforce, and Bill Gates, the former chief executive of Microsoft, and Ginni Rometty, the chief executive of IBM.It’s also another attempt to entrench policy creation inside the executive branch and away from Congress after the stinging setback that the President suffered in his attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act.I promised the American people I would produce results, and apply my ‘ahead of schedule, under budget’ mentality to the government.”At 36 years-old, Kushner has an almost unprecedented level of access to the President for someone without any political or policy experience.Again, the Twitter commentariat had some thoughts:
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Yet it was recently —billions more than Hilton, the world's largest hotel chain, with more than 800,000 rooms.Intangible assets like brand sentiment, customer relationships, intellectual property, and human capital.In fact, intangibles now comprise 84% of corporate valuations on the S 500 index—up from just 17% in 1975, according to , a global research study sponsored last year by Oracle and conducted by the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA) and Chartered Institute of Management Accountants.Unfortunately, traditional financial key performance indicators (KPIs) aren't much help when it comes to measuring the worth of, say, customer satisfaction or employee engagement.So CFOs are searching for dependable ways to gauge the value of such assets, manage their performance, and drive new strategies to grow their value.But when intangibles represent the vast majority of the value of S 500 companies, CFOs can't afford simply to ignore them.
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Airlines are generally less digitally savvy than some other sectors when it comes to exploiting the likes of big data analytics and the Internet of Things.Some carriers are doing a great job when it comes to in-cabin service, online bookings, tracking bags and informing passengers about gate changes.But unfortunately, many airlines tend to tackle these services in a segmented way, not providing a visible and seamless presentation of their offerings online, and thus not giving consumers a full, 360 digital experience, says Nikunj Shanti, chief data and digital officer at AirAsia.While AirAsia was among the first to only do bookings online and has been proactive on social media, Mr Shanti could not help but perceive the airline as epitomising a low-cost carrier (LCC).AirAsia, Asia’s largest LCC in terms of passengers carried, is not looking at any airline as a role model for undergoing digital transformation.AirAsia group chief executive Tony Fernandes says the airline is not moving rapidly enough to leverage information technology in a virtual world, which would bring about substantial cost savings, improve customer experience and satisfaction and ultimately boost revenue in the future.
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