Channel 4 was shocked to learn last week that it was one of several brands running ads against extremist content on YouTube.“We got a call from The Times last week.“We immediately instructed all our ads to be pulled on the basis that it’s not a safe environment at the moment.”Brooke, who said approximately 5 percent of Channel 4’s ad spend goes towards YouTube, often pre-roll ads for Channel 4’s shows, voices a feeling familiar to media companies during this latest furore around brand safety: “If this happened in established media then we would be crucified.”Google, for its part, looks to be making good on its promises to raise the bar on ad policies, increase brand safety controls and improve transparency.Our ads have been appearing against content that is, at best, extremely offensive and, at worse, extraordinarily offensive to Channel 4’s core values.
(Reuters) – Ride services company Uber Technologies has been thrust deeper into turmoil with the departure of company president Jeff Jones, a marketing expert hired to help soften its often abrasive image.Jones quit less than seven months after joining the San Francisco company, an Uber spokesman said on Sunday.In a statement to Reuters, Jones said he could not continue as president of a business with which he was incompatible.“I joined Uber because of its mission, and the challenge to build global capabilities that would help the company mature and thrive long term,” Jones said.“It is now clear, however, that the beliefs and approach to leadership that have guided my career are inconsistent with what I saw and experienced at Uber, and I can no longer continue as president of the ride sharing business,” he added.Jones wished the “thousands of amazing people at the company” well.Jones’ role was put into question after Uber earlier this month launched a search for a chief operating officer to help run the company alongside Chief Executive Travis Kalanick.Jones had been performing some of those COO responsibilities.He joined Uber from Target, where he was chief marketing officer and is credited with modernizing the retailer’s brand.“We want to thank Jeff for his six months at the company and wish him all the best,” an Uber spokesman said in an emailed statement.Uber’s vice president of maps and business platform, Brian McClendon, said separately he plans to leave the company at the end of the month to explore politics.“I’ll be staying on as an adviser,” McClendon said in a statement to Reuters.“This fall’s election and the current fiscal crisis in Kansas is driving me to more fully participate in our democracy.”Jones and McClendon are the latest in a string of high-level executives to leave the company.Last month, engineering executive Amit Singhal was asked to resign due to a sexual harassment allegation stemming from his previous job at Alphabet Inc’s Google.Earlier this month, Ed Baker, Uber’s vice president of product and growth, and Charlie Miller, Uber’s famed security researcher, departed.Technology news site Recode first reported Jones’ departure on Sunday.Uber, while it has long had a reputation as an aggressive and unapologetic startup, has been battered with multiple controversies over the last several weeks that have put Kalanick’s leadership capabilities and the company’s future into question.A former Uber employee last month published a blog post describing a workplace where sexual harassment was common and went unpunished.The blog post prompted an internal investigation that is being led by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder.Then, Bloomberg released a video that showed Kalanick berating an Uber driver who had complained about cuts to rates paid to drivers, resulting in Kalanick making a public apology.And earlier this month Uber confirmed it had used a secret technology program dubbed “Greyball,” which effectively changes the app view for specific riders, to evade authorities in cities where the service has been banned.
Amsterdam nattlivschef, kroppsarkitekten Lucy McRae and Estonia's CIO.All involved in the new Stockholmsfestivalen Gather, which can accommodate everything from yoga and conversation about technology and people.Gather, which takes place over four days in september, called for a inspirationsfestival and stretches like South by Southwest in the U.S. across multiple disciplines.club nights and concerts to share in the festival programme with panel discussions and a ”lab” where experts in various fields are invited to find solutions to the challenges that can include everything from urban planning to the democracy.”This will be the beginning of a cascade of magical stuff to present for Stockholm with everything from the most inspiring speakers to strange morgonsessions, running clubs, long nights, bastutalks and, not least, a lot of projects that will run in parallel during the festival week and to give rise to actual solutions,” said founder Jakob Grandin, who also is behind the Stockholmsklubbarna the Garden and Under the bridge.”Gather is all about getting the different disciplines to meet to get exciting things to happen.
A group of MPs has called in three of the tech giants' leading lights to answer questions about the spreading of hate speech and general abuse through their networks, with bosses from Twitter, Facebook and Google being straight-up accused of making "money out of hate" by members of the Home Affairs Committee.It's enough to make you proud of democracy for a change.It's well worth watching the actual video of the grilling to see how much squirming is done by the trio of execs.In one particularly cringeworthy exchange, Yvette Cooper asks Google communications boss Peter Barron the question: "In what circumstance is 'Jews admit organising white genocide' not a statement of hate speech?"to which Barron fumbles and stutters something about the definition of hate speech and how it's more about interpretation than actual laws, without saying anything of meaning.The Twitter man, meanwhile, was handed examples of offensive hashtags that weren't removed from his site.
Last Thursday, South Korean president Park Geun-Hye was officially ousted from her office after a special Constitutional Court decision held up her impeachment.For the majority of Koreans, it’s the end of a gruelling three-month trial and a longer national scandal.But during the biggest crisis in South Korea’s young democracy, the road to impeachment was filled with fake information spread through the popular messaging app KakaoTalk, websites and newspaper-like pamphlets in which fictional western experts named after anime characters proved made-up conspiracies and “Donald Trump” supported President Park Geun-Hye.From online, they grew large enough to hold counter-protests of their own.A poster of Son Seok-hee, the editorial director of a left-wing TV station that broke most of the Choi Soon-sil scandal, calling him a liar.Fake news so far backed mostly Park and other conservative causes.
It requires internet companies to keep customers' web-surfing history for 12 months.It also gives spying agencies and police powers to conduct mass hacking of IT infrastructure, PCs, smartphones and other devices and was described by NSA-contractor turned whistleblower Edward Snowden as "the most extreme surveillance in the history of western democracy".Earlier this month Lord Justice Fulford was appointed the first Investigatory Powers Commissioner, who will oversee the use of Investigatory Powers by public authorities.The government has also launched a consultation on five key draft codes of practice to cover areas including interception of communications, 'equipment interference', bulk communications data acquisition, bulk personal datasets and national security notices.One of the more controversial elements covered it the consultation is 'equipment interference' - or the ability of spy agencies, police and others to hack into devices or tech infrastructure to find information or conduct surveillance.The consultation notes this equipment could include traditional computers or "computer-like devices such as tablets, smart phones, cables, wires and static storage devices" which could be hacked either from afar or by direct physically contact.
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has again defended having Peter Thiel on the company’s board, saying calls to kick the social network’s first big investor off the board are “crazy.”Speaking at North Carolina A State University on Monday, Zuckerberg said, “I think the folks who are saying we shouldn’t have someone on our board because they’re a Republican, I think that’s crazy.”The talk was broadcast live on Facebook.Thiel’s ties to President Trump have been controversial because the president’s views and policies — including on immigration, race and gender — are controversial.Zuckerberg has defended Thiel before, and on Monday he brought Thiel up without being asked specifically about him.(The question, from a college student there, was: “What do you personally due to ensure that your company maintains a free and safe environment for the expression of all thoughts and feelings?”)Ellen Pao, a noted critic of Thiel and Trump, on Tuesday called attention to a tweetstorm from Silicon Valley web developer Marco Rogers, who called “bulls—” on Zuckerberg’s defense of Thiel in the name of “ideological diversity.”What’s Rogers’ problem with Thiel?Well, Thiel, a longtime libertarian, once wrote that women’s suffrage was bad for democracy.He also co-wrote a book with another tech executive, David Sacks (formerly of Yammer and Zenefits), in which they characterized date rape as “belated regret.” Last year, amid renewed interest in the book because of Thiel’s support for Trump, they apologized for their comments in the book.In “The Diversity Myth,” Thiel and Sacks slammed multiculturalism, diversity, gender studies and political correctness.If that sounds familiar, they are the same themes that are decried by Trump and his supporters.Back to “crazy,” which is also how Zuckerberg referred to the idea first floated around last year after the presidential election that fake news might have influenced the outcome.
Last Thursday, South Korean president Park Geun-Hye was officially ousted from her office after a special Constitutional Court decision held up her impeachment.For the majority of Koreans, it’s the end of a gruelling three-month trial and a longer national scandal.But during the biggest crisis in South Korea’s young democracy, the road to impeachment was filled with fake information spread through the popular messaging app KakaoTalk, websites and newspaper-like pamphlets in which fictional western experts named after anime characters proved made-up conspiracies and “Donald Trump” supported President Park Geun-Hye.From online, they grew large enough to hold counter-protests of their own.A poster of Son Seok-hee, the editorial director of a left-wing TV station that broke most of the Choi Soon-sil scandal, calling him a liar.Fake news so far backed mostly Park and other conservative causes.
The submersible named by people who think "that's what she said" is the height of intelligent comedy, Boaty McBoatface, is embarking on its maiden voyage this week.If you're wondering why something called Boaty McBoatface is a submarine and not a boat, the answer is basically that democracy isn't real.Despite absolutely storming the boat-naming competition, Boatface was deemed too stupid a name for a £200m research vessel and was instead given to a group of three robotic autosubs.The original boat was instead named RRS Sir David Attenborough.However, Boaty is still pretty cool.It's a yellow robot submarine (technically, a group of three yellow robot submarines) which autonomously pilots itself to investigate remote underwater areas.
The submersible named by people who think "that's what she said" is the height of intelligent comedy, Boaty McBoatface, is embarking on its maiden voyage this week.If you're wondering why something called Boaty McBoatface is a submarine and not a boat, the answer is basically that democracy isn't real.Despite absolutely storming the boat-naming competition, Boatface was deemed too stupid a name for a £200m research vessel and was instead given to a group of three robotic autosubs.The original boat was instead named RRS Sir David Attenborough.However, Boaty is still pretty cool.It's a yellow robot submarine (technically, a group of three yellow robot submarines) which autonomously pilots itself to investigate remote underwater areas.
World Wide Web inventor Sir Tim Berners-Lee has said the impact of fake news is increasingly concerning, as he unveiled plans to tackle “unethical” political advertising and the harvesting of data.The British computer scientist said, exactly 28 years after his invention, the three new trends have become alarming in the last 12 months, the Press Association reported.In an open letter published on Sunday, Sir Tim, 61, said misuse of data has created a “chilling effect on free speech” and warned of “internet blind spots” that are corrupting democracy.Peter Macdiarmid via Getty ImagesOne problem, he wrote, is that most people find their news and information through a “handful” of social media sites and search engines, which are paid whenever someone clicks a link.“The net result is that these sites show us content they think we’ll click on – meaning that misinformation, or fake news, which is surprising, shocking, or designed to appeal to our biases, can spread like wildfire,” he added.
Happy birthday to the web, which is 28 years young today... and it's creator Sir Tim Berners-Lee has used the occasion to warn us all about three "challenges" that threaten to get in the way of the web "fulfilling its potential".First, Berners-Lee tackles personal data, saying that we should be given more control over the information we're sharing and how it's being shared - rather than having it kept in "proprietary silos" by the web's biggest companies.The web's creator wants to see more transparency in those terms and conditions we're always clicking through, as well as greater freedom from government monitoring, another consequence of giving websites and app makers permission to gobble up our data.Berners-Lee also calls for more "transparency and understanding" when it comes to political advertising online, saying that the way parties can carefully target individual users with different adverts goes against the principles of democracy and is "a near-impossible situation to monitor".The third threat to the web as we know it is fake news, or "misinformation" as Berners-Lee calls it, which he says can spread "like wildfire".As with political advertising, the complexity of the technology now on the web has made it easier for businesses to target users with stories that may not be 100 percent accurate.
“This one $40, this one $30 … that one $20!” The owner of the street stall, a man of about 30 years wearing a traditional longyi tied around his waist, is gesturing at a phone that looks, to my eyes, like a mid-range Android phone.It bears the brand Singtech, a brand among myriad others you’ve probably never heard of, and a stick on the screen show app icons for Facebook, WhatsApp, Twitter and Yahoo.The centre of Yangon, in Myanmar, is dominated by Sule Pagoda, a golden stupa Buddhist shrine that hosted a ‘saffron revolution’ of monks in 2007 on the country's slow path towards democracy.Myanmar is now the land of the $20 smartphone.“People here often have a couple of phones for multiple SIM cards because when the mobile networks were being built a few years ago that was the only way to ensure connectivity wherever you went in the country,” says Brad Jones, CEO at Wave Money, a joint financial technology venture between Yoma Bank and Norwegian mobile network operator Telenor.Everything changed in 2014 when Telenor and Qatar telecommunications company Ooreedo entered Myanmar, building extensive 3G mobile networks (Myanmar skipped 2G completely) alongside the state-owned network of the Ministry of Posts and Telecom (MPT).
American politician Bernie Sanders is accused raju said the country's fresh president with Donald Trump, calling him a pathological liar, that is driving America toward the car, the knight industries.for the Guardian newspaper, in an interview with Vermont senator painted a bleak picture of the White house's intentions.sanders said the Trump contested by the attacks on the media, the judiciary and other american public life pillars is a conscious attack against democracy.”Trump lying all the time, and I don't believe it to be damage, but there's a reason.He's lying to undermine American democracy,” Sanders said.Sanders said he was concerned about Trump's economic programme, which the rich are given tax relief and cut in the same systems, which affect the middle class.
While equality may be a central tenet of life in the U.S., it certainly doesn't manifest itself in the form of our access to the internet.It may be a central tenet of our democracy, but it doesn’t look like equality is all that present when it comes to the internet in our country.According to a new report from Akamai Technologies, the “State of the Internet” really varies depending on which state you’re in.Data from the internet service provider (ISP) suggests that connection speeds differ drastically depending on location, with a distinct divide present between the heavily populated coasts of the U.S. and the more rural midwestern states.According to Akamai’s study, states on either coast not only have more access to the internet but also faster connections, as measured in megabits per second.The fastest speeds are enjoyed by those living in the northeast region of the U.S., with our nation’s capital taking first place at 26.6 Mbps.
That pointy building in London full of people pretending to know what we want is it danger of imminent collapse according to governmental money men, who say that our MPs need to be relocated to do their guffawing elsewhere so that the rotting carcass of democracy can be rebuilt.And it'll only cost around £4bn to do so.This comes from the Public Accounts Committee, which has waded in on the long running saga that is What To Do About The Palace of Westminster?.Things are getting worse the longer it's left, like that damp patch in your kitchen only on a much bigger scale, with the PAC warning that the building ricks a "catastrophic" collapse in the very near future unless things involving builders, spirit levels, lots of sighing and billions of pounds is done.The PAC report favours the "full decant" option of removing all of the governmental people and business from the premises so the works can be done at once, rather than gradually bodging pieces up over the course of decades while business continues under scaffolding, Sagrada Família style.This has previously been thought of as the quickest and cheapest option, with the PAC suggesting a six-year programme of repairs to an unoccupied shell is needed.
Above: 3D-printed models of people are seen in front of a Facebook logo in this photo illustration taken June 9, 2016.Britain’s newspaper publishers have filed a complaint with a government committee looking into the problem of “fake news,” and said regulators need to look into Google and Facebook’s dominance in the media and advertising industries.The group says the country’s communications and competition authorities should regulate the two tech giants because of their influence in the marketplace, including potentially forcing them to pay newspapers a licensing fee for using their content.The News Media Alliance, which represents more than 1,100 British newspapers, filed a letter in response to an inquiry that was launched in January by the House of Commons committee on culture, media and sport, looking into the spread of fake news and what can be done about it.In the letter, the NMA said that fake news “is a growing cause for concern around the world, with implications for an informed electorate and democracy itself,” and that many of the sites and publishers who produce it rely on “gaming the algorithms Facebook, Google and other networks and platforms use to connect their users with news stories.”According to the alliance, Britain has not been impacted as much by fake news as the United States and some other countries, because “we still have a robust news media sector in this country.” However, the NMA warns that Facebook and Google’s powerful duopoly is putting that at risk.
We are already satiated, satisfied and happy in our world – so we need something else entirely.It is postmodernism 2.0, in which the phenomenon of democracy feels outdated and it must disruptas.Disruptive innovation means taking on a market and completely revolutionize it.So which areas are on the way to disruptas right now?Here are four areas that has been on my radar.to be young is soon completely gone and into a new generation of individuals stepped.
As The Washington Post first reported, current attorney general Jeff Sessions twice met with a Russian diplomat last year; meetings that he did not disclose in his confirmation hearings within the Senate Judiciary Committee.The accusation that one has made a false or misleading statement within judicial or quasi-judicial proceedings while under an oath is not a legal development limited to the modern era.In antiquity, oaths were an important part of religious rites.Around 1780 BCE, the Mesopotamian Code of Hammurabi listed murder, witchcraft and perjury as top offenses.Prohibitions against those who gave false testimony are also mentioned in the Old Testament, both within Deuteronomy and Leviticus.In the ancient Greek world, oaths were also an important part of guaranteeing the truth.
This is what they say:I applaud Zuckerberg for his recent announcement to invest billion to find cures for the major diseases in the world.The technology sector has the ability to educate the entire world and raise the standard of living for those currently impoverished via hardware and the internet.Obviously, it’s easiest to compare the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative to the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has bettered the lives of millions of people.If we want to preserve a healthy democracy, I do think that it is important that individuals participate actively in civic life.Plus, it sends the message that companies are not just out to make money, but can use innovation to improve the world for all of us.
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